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ANB757 12/28/94 
mm TOWNSHIP LIERARy 
757 rfAIN STREET 
Antioch 



HC-5 



VOL 107-NO.40 



ANTIOCH, OCTOBER 1, 1993 



Emmons School goes 
for tax referendum 



by MARY FOLEY 

Lakeland Newspapers * 

Facing inadequate facilities and 
overcrowding at the Emmons Grade 
School, the board has determined it will 
be necessary to consider a spring 
referendum for a building addition. 

The school, located on Beach Grove 
Road in Antioch, is predicting that in 
spite of the many efforts to accommodate 
and provide for quality education, a 
building addition to the existing school 
may be necessary. A plan for building 
this addition has been designed by the 
building action team. 
Presently, the school has approximately 

BEST sends 
surveys to 
candidates 

by, MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Better Education Sensible Taxes 
(BEST) organization has sent out a 
survey to District 1 17 candidates. The 
survey was mailed without disclosing its 
purpose. 

"It's pretty self-explanatory," said Alan 
Knutsen, President of the Board of 
Directors of BEST. "The purpose is clear 
from the heading of the survey." 

However, the survey is entitled, 
"B.E.S.T. District 117, School Board 
Candidate Questionnaire," which fails to 
indicate that the information will be 
(Continued on page 10) 



15 classrooms. The new building plan 
will nearly double the size of the school 
by adding 10 new classrooms. The 
classrooms will be built onto the existing 
building and include two floors of five 
classrooms each. 

"This will be no-frill classroom space," 
said Superintendent Mathias Tabar. "It 
will make the school quite a bit larger." 

Emmons School is one of the two 
single school independent districts in the 
Antioch area. The district has experienced 
a large increase in its enrollment this 
year. According to Tabar, the increases 
are a result of homeowner turn-over of 
(Continued on page 10) 




On a roll 



The Antioch Sequoit varsity 
football team is on a roll after 
winning back to back conference 
games for the first time in two 
seasons. For more coverage, see 
Sports. — Photo by Steve Young 



Businesses to learn of 
Antioch 1 s revitalization 



by CLAUDIA M. LENART 
Lakeland Newspapers 

What is 'The Meeting?' Antioch 
business people who have yellow signs in 
their windows proclaiming thai they will 
attend The Meeting' know. 

Claude LeMcre, community 
development director, has called a meeting 
of Antioch merchants at 7 a.m., Tuesday, 
Oct 5, at Antioch Village Hall. LeMerc 
urges all business owners to attend if they 
care about their business. 

LeMcre has been talking to village 
businesses and drumming up support and 
participation in Antioch revitalization. At 



IL 6 



Reporter 

^^L ©1993-ASchro 



Schroeder Publication 



TWO SECTIONS-72 PAGES 



5.00 PER COPY 



the meeting, LeMcre will further explain 
the physical and internal plan for 
downtown revitalization. 

"I want to create some enthusiasm 
within the business community," said 
LeMcre. 

As for the signs, LeMcre said he wants 
businesses to show their commitment to 
the community. 

The village recently entered Phase 1 of 
the revitalization program with the start 
of the Orchard Street extension, 
renovation of the Chamber Building and 
cleaning up of what is to become the 
town square. 








Friendly advice 



Three-year-old Colleen Karberg and her mom Debbie, help Lori Michalak pick 
out the right color of mums for planting. As the fall season makes its entrance 
into Lake County, so does the fall planting season. — Photo by Gene Gabry 

Lower taxes res 
from Dist. 34 budget 




by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

A budget of $8,539,627 was approved 
at a District 34 school board meeting. 
This figure represents a total increase of 
12.5 percent. 

However, when the anticipated land 
purchases are subtracted out, the budget 
represents an increase of only 4.6 percent. 
Despite the budget increase, it is 
anticipated the total tax rate will decrease 
slightly. 

The tax rate is expected to decrease 
from 2.704 per hundred to 2.689 per 
hundred. 

The approved budget does result in 
some differences in the fund balances in 
the Education and Building Funds which 
were presented in the tentative budget. In 
any case, the differences are accounted for 
by additional revenue or expenditures 
approved by the board. 



In a related action, District 34 received 
notification from the Illinois State Board 
of Education that the At Risk Grant for 
the year has been approved at 
$129,542,000. This amount is $10,000 
more than was anticipated. 

The At Risk Program is a preschool 
program for area children expected to enter 
school in the following year. This is a 
state program which parallels the federally 
funded Head-start program. 

The At Risk program provides 
educational and emotional support for 4- 
year-olds who suffer from cultural 
deprivation. This excellent program has 
fairly stringent admission requirements 
which include an evaluation of the "risk" 
factors the child may be experiencing. 

Also discussed at the meeting was the 
wonderful reaction local students, parents, 
and other community members had to the 
(Continued on page 10) 




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2 Lakeland Newspapers 



7 ' 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



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Lakeland Newspapers' COUNTY NEWS 




ounty 

AtA 

Glance 

Housing Authority 
seeks public input 

LAKE COUNTY— The Lake 
County Housing Authority has scheduled 
two public hearings later this month to 
obtain public input regarding the 
continuation of the Lake County 
Homestead Program and the Authority's 
Homeowner Rehabilitation program as it 
intends to apply for $550,000 from Lake 
County's Year 20 Community 
Development Block Grant fund. The 
grant would be utilized to operate and 
administer the homestead program, which 
creates affordable home ownership for first 
time buyers, and the rehabilitation 
program, which provides funds to 
complete housing code related repairs. 
The hearings will be held at the 
Authority's office, 33928 N. Rte. 45, in 
Grayslake on Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. and Oct. 
21 at 2 p.m. Written comment can be 
sent to Gordon Fessenden, Authority 
associate director, at the same address. 

Grand opening set for 
new soccer complex 

LIBERTYVILLE— The Liberty ville 
Township Soccer Complex has resched- 
-uled its grand opening for 1:15 p.m. Oct. 
3 at the irlain shelter site near the junction 
of Janet Kay Blvd. and Donnelley Ln. 
Featured speakers are expected to include 
township supervisor Ralph Swank and 
soccer board chairman Ed Moore. 



High school student 
contracts meningitis 

WAUCONDA— A 16-year-old 
Island Lake girl who attends Wauconda 
High School has contracted 
meningococcal meningitis and is currently 
at Children's Memorial Hospital in 
Chicago in critical condition. The student 
was admitted to the hospital on Sept. 23 
after going to the Good Shepherd Hospital 
emergency room the day before after 
comiug down with symptoms of the life- 
threatening disease. Wauconda Unit 
District 118 officials notified student 
parents,. and no wide-spread testing has 
been scheduled. Those persons who were 
deemed at-risk were treated with 
antibiotics, said Michael Crandall, a Lake 
County Health Department spokesman. 

Hazardous waste will 
be collected on Oct. 9 

VERNON HILLS— The village, in 
association with Illinois Environmental 
Protection Agency will be holding a 
hazardous waste collection day at the 
above date from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the 
Hawthorn Junior High, parking lot 201. 
All Lake County residents may participate 
in the program. Accepted items include: 
oil based paints, latex paints, insecticides, 
old gasoline, pool chemicals, solvents and 
used motor oil. Not accepted items 
include: business wastes, explosives, 
propane tanks, smoke detectors, farm 
machinery oil, agricultural chemicals, 
fireworks, fire extinguishers and lead acid 
batteries. 

Police get first hand 
account of OC spray 

LINDEN HURST— The police took 
part in a training and demonstration 
session of Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) 
spray. All the officers were sprayed with 
the product and the first was Police Chief 
Jack McKeever. The offers tried with no 
avail, to successfully charge Sgt. Andy 
Jones who had the OC spray. The village 
board approved of the use of OC spray as 
a means to control aggressive offenders 
who refuse to cooperate with police 
without having to use physical force. 



Co-chairs agree on value 
of preserve referendum 



by CLAUDIA M. LENART 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Environmentalist meets developer. 
They join hands and go on to launch a 
county wide and ambitious campaign. That 
Utopian scenario occurred as co-chairs of 
the Forest Preserve District's bond 
referendum, Richard Brown of Cambridge 
Homes and Joyce O'Kecfc of the 
Opcnlands Project, kicked-off the 
campaign with a rally and speeches. 

Colin McRae, forest preserve president, 
introduced the co-chairs and stressed that 
the campaign is a time to focus on the 
positives. "We can all work together. Our 
differences can be our strengths," said 
McRae. 

One area in which O'Kecfc and Brown 
were in strong agreement on is the value 
of passing the $30 million bond issue 
this November with interest rates being at 
an historical low, "Vote for your forest 
preserves: The value of a lifetime" is the 
theme of the campaign. 

To a room represented largely by 
environmentalists, Brown started his 
speech by saying, "I feel like I'm in a 
lion's den." But Brown pointed out that 
although he may have been on opposite 
ends of the fence with environmental 
interests at times, one teams to respect 
those you fight with. "We don't really 
wear black hats," the developer said. 

Brown said people in the building 
industry recognize the importance of the 
environment in Lake County and many 
builders are supportive of the referendum. 

Brown stressed that, with low interest 



rates, more money will be able to go for 
purchase of land and less to pay interest. 
"Two to three years from now, it would 
cost a lot more. Interest rates will never 
be as low as they are now," he said. 

"We're willing to do everything we can 
. to get this passed," Brown said. 

In O'Kccfc's address, she outlined the 
diverse reasons Lake County residents 
support the forest preserve campaign. She 
said some residents enjoy the beauty of 
the forest preserves. "It restores our spirit, 
helps us keep going when things arc 
tough," said O'Kecfc. 

O'Kecfe continued to say others find 
value in the preserves because of the 
recreational opportunities, because they 
enjoy seeing open spaces, and because 
the preserves serve functions such as flood 
control. 

Whatever the reasons for supporting the 
forest preserves, O'Kecfc said, "All agree 
this is the value of a lifetime." 

O'Kecfc pointed to '93 as being a year 
to remember with the flooding, health 
care reform, the Bulls 'three-peat* and 
more. She said "I hope '93 is known as 
the year we passed the forest preserve 
referendum and the year we issued the 
value of a lifetime." 

Campaign Manager Gloria Fauss also 
spoke briefly. She said the campaign 
needs donations and volunteers to man the 
phone banks. Those interested can call the 
campaign office at 367-7378. The office 
is located at 432 Peterson Rd., 
Liberty vi lie. 



Local business offers 
$20 mammograms 

LIBERTYVILLE — A mobile 
mammography unit from Midwestern 
Regional Medical Center and Cancer 
Treatment Centers of America will be at 
Bernard Chevrolet, 1001 S. Milwaukee 
Ave., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day from 
Oct. 4 to Oct. 9. The screenings will be 
offered for only $20. Bernard Chevrolet 
will pay the difference. Bernard will also 
sponsor a program on cancer detection 
and prevention during the week in one of 
the conference rooms at the dealership. 
"Nutrition in the Prevention and 
Treatment of Cancer" will be presented at 
6 p.m. Oct 5 and at 10 a.m. Oct 6. To 
schedule an appointment or to register for 
one of the free lectures, call 872-1615. 

Board threatens to 
file injunction 

LINCOLNSHIRE — Proponents of. 
the addition to Stevenson High School are 
anxious to begin construction. The 
contract was awarded before the Village 
of Lincolnshire had an opportunity to 
review the plans. The village attorney has 
been instructed to file a lawsuit unless the 
school district lives up to its promise in 
the annexation agreement. 

Bus driver target 
for sex abuse probe 

' GRAYSLAKE— Grayslake High 
School Supt Ray Novak was expected to 
meet Wednesday with a school bus driver 
who is the subject of a sexual abuse 
investigation. "We will be meeting with 
the individual to determine the next step. 
We have to follow with the union rules. 
Further action would have to be taken by 
the board of education," Novak said. The 
school bus driver is under investigation 
by McHenry County and Fox Lake police 
The school bus driver is still employed by 
the high school. 




LilDdcl VILv*** >•<««* •••••* «««D 



*•»•»*••••*»*•**«** 



•Good Be^niuiigs^... ,14 
•Bustaess...«.....M.»;....19 

•fafcplifa 9$ 

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•Crossword Puzzle.....29 

•Hor6scope;.M.„.....«.«29 

•Where lb Eat Out .....29 

•Employment... i .........*lb 

•Fall Foliage. .....;....33 

•CarGare.......,...,.........36 

•Classified. ............38 

•dbituaries...............,..38 

•pet rarade.*(.t...*..*.....4i7 

•Sports....... .........51 

•Bank and Finance....,59 



Sindles sees changes 
in Sheriffs Dept. 

MUNDELEIN — Ed Sindles, 
currently Deputy Superintendent of the 
Lake County Jail, formally announced his 
candidacy for the post of Lake County 
Sheriff at a fund raising dinner in Fox 
Lake Sept. 28. He sees a need for 
updating the way the department operates 
and believes they should assume a 
leadership role in taking a proactive 
approach to crime. 



FREE LUNCH OR DINNER AND 
ESTATE PUNNING SEMINAR 

Learn How To Transfer Your Estate To Your 
Family Quickly And Without Probate Fees 



Where: 



ATTEND THIS SEMINAR: 

GURNEE 1=3 HAMPTON INN 



When: OCTOBER 7, 1993 

1:00 p.m. or 6:00 p.m. 

Door Prizes - Call 223-9200 Now 



SAVE YOUR FAMILY TIME AND MONEY 

Do you know what "probate" is? It is the court process by which dcbLs are paid and 
assets are distributed to heirs. 

What can you do now so that your loved ones can avoid the cosily and frustrating 
probate process? You can attend a FREE ESTATE PLANNING SEMINAR - and 
learn how a living trust can work for your family. A living trust can be defined in 
simple terms as a will substitute, one dial allows your heirs to avoid meeting a 
probate judge. As die trustee (financial manager) of your trust, you can continue to do 
ihc same things you did before the irust existed, such as buy, sell, or give away the 
trusts' assets. You set up your living trust according to your desires. You are in 
complete control. 

In Illinois, probate is required when the assets total over *50,000. The probate 
process can be quite costly, reducing die amount of assets that heirs receive. 
Attorney's fees, court costs and executor's fees can reduce assets that go to die heirs 
by as much as 10%. There is also a time delay, because the minimum amount of time 
thai an estate would be tied up in probate court in Illinois is six months, but normally 
probate lakes nine to iwclvc months, and sometimes longer. 

When you consider the cost of a will and die fees involved in probate, as compared 
to selling up a living trust, die trust is a much more reasonable choice. It saves not 
only money, bul time. Your heirs will not have to wait six, nine, or twelve months lo 
receive what you have left diem. 

Sponsored by: The Law Firm Of Polster And Associates 

A FIRM YOU CAN TRUST. Polster and Associates has prepared hundreds of 
estate plans for families in Illinois like your own. We invite you to attend one of our 
Free Estate Planning Seminars. We'll explain die disadvantages of wills and holding 
properly in joint tenancy. You'll learn about the advantages of living trusts and how 
Uicy work. You'll be informed so dial you can make die best decisions Tor your 
family. Sealing is limited, call (708) 223-9200. Do your friends a favor and invite 
dicmlo join you. 

We also invite you to listen lo our weekly radio program on WKRS 1220 at 1:00 
p.m. every Tuesday aflernoon. 



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Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 3 



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MOWiS^t^s: 







President's health care 
plan evokes questions 



Since President Clinton's announce 
ment of his health care program a lot of 
people are wondering what effect the 
plan will have on them and their current 
relationships with area doctors and 
health care facilities. 

Unfortunately, many of the details of 
the pran are still nebu lous, and health 



by SUZ'IE REED 

Liikthind Newspapers 



care providers are as mystified as their 
patients. 

"We don't know how the alliances are 
going to relate to the insurance 
companies or how hospitals are going to 
relate to the alliances," said Eugene 
Pritchard, president of Condell Medical 
Center. 

"Hospitals and physicians will have to 
draw closer together, " he said. "People 
will not be able to select their favorite 
doctor because it will become more ex- 



pensive. They will avoid the choice and 
go for the less expensive option." 

Of the 20 to 25 percent of "fat" Clin- 
ton claimed is in hospital budgets 
Pritchard said, "I'm kind of curious where 
that is. I don't see it 

"He says a single form will make the 
billing process more efficient, but the 
cost of billing insurance companies is 
only one percent of our expense. 

"We're just waiting for the plan to un- 
fold. We're very attentive to what comes 
out of Washington these days," Pritchard 
said. 

"How arc we going to pay for this 
$200 billion our of Medicaid and it not af- 
fect the operations of the health care in- 
dustry?" he wondered. 

Health care administrators, like their 
patients, arc still waiting for the details. 
Until more Information is available, It is 
impossible to determine what effect the- 
plan will have on anyone. 




m^^m^^^^^^^^Mk^^^m^'^^^^^^mmB 



Technological advances 




Regina Doll (left) from mammography consulting services demonstrates how 
to use the DMR mammography system to Dr. Adele Gomez and Auxiliary 
President Susan Ewalt. The machine was purchased through a grant 
received by the medical center. — Photo by Gene Gabry 



I., 

3 



HIV clinic 
in service 

The Lake County 
Health Department an- 
nounced that it has begun 
clinics for early medical 
management of people 
who have been diagnosed 
with Human Immunode- 
ficiency Virus (HIV), the 
virus that causes AIDS, at 
the Belvidere Medical 
Building, 2400 Belvidere 
Rd., Waukegan. The clinic 
is directed at low income 
people who lack medical 
insurance and who cannot 
afford private medical 
care. Fees are based on 
ability to pay. 

At the clinic, which is 
by appointment, a physi- 
cian will coordinate care, 
including assistance with 
locating specialized 
medical services. In addi- 
tion, counselors and case 
managers will assist with 
public aid coverage, as 
well as assist patients with 
linkage to other resources. 

The current clinic 
physician is a volunteer. 
However, William Mays, 
Director of Medical Ser- 
vices for the Health De- 
partment, stated that, be- 
ginning in December the 
Board of Health has ap- 
proved funding for a paid 
physician. 



708-688-HELP 



The Victory if you or 

someone 

Memorial you love 
Hospital [ * , 

r struggling 

Dependency with an 

d mm -« m alcohol or 

Program drug 

addiction, a single phone 
call can put you in touch 
with the professional, 
confidential help you need. 
Don't wait another day - 
make the call that can 
change your life. 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



1324 North Sheridan Rd. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



Who would believe that today a 
laser beam could actually replace 
the surgical scalpel. Well, it's not 
science fiction. It's happening right 
now at the Endoscopy and Laser 
Care Center at Victory Memorial 
Hospital. 

What would your 
grandmother say? 

Surgery in the good 

old days — two weeks in 

the hospital, almost two 

months of recovery, and a 

scar the size of a zipper. 

Today, many types of 

surgical procedures are 

performed on an 

outpatient basis or with a 




surgical expertise. The Endoscopy 
and Laser Care Center is a concept 
that brings together an experienced 
surgical staff and physicians, 
excellent facilities and equipment 
and an ongoing commitment to 
education and training. Every 

registered nurse in the 
surgery department is 
"laser-certified". 
Look ma, Vm on TV. 

Video cameras, 
scopes and fiber optics 
appear more like "Star 
Wars" than surgery, 
but these are all part of 
the futuristic 
technology at Victory. 



for outpatient endoscopic or laser 

surgery. 

prostate problems. Males who 

experience bothersome symptoms 

of bladder obstruction can often be 

successfully treated with laser 

surgery. 

eye surgery. When cataracts have 

been removed by non-laser 

surgery, vision may cloud. Laser 



A Single Point of Light 




brief overnight stay. Unsightly scars 
are often replaced by 2-4 small 
incisions which can be covered with a 
band-aid. Post-operative recovery 
time is significantly reduced. Chance 
of infection is-diminished. And, a 
man really did walk on the moon. 

Our reputation precedes us. 

Victory is known throughout 
Lake County as a resource for 



Let's talk problems. 

BACKACHES. If 

you suffer from 
back and neck pain, 
you may have a 
herniated disc. Now, 
board-certified 
neurosurgeons at 
Victory can 
perform Laser Disk Decompression 
on an outpatient basis. Usually, 
within two weeks, patients are back 
lo their normal routine. 

OVARIAN CYSTS, INFERTILITY, 
ENDOMETRIOSIS, TUBAL 

pregnancies. If a woman has 
problems with extremely painful 
periods, irregular bleeding or 
infertility, she may be a candidate 



eye surgery often restores complete 
sight. Lasers are also used for 
retinal surgery. 

diseases of the mouth. Jaw pain! 
mouth ulcers, gingival tissue 
recontouring, lesions on the tongue 
and lips, denture sores and pre- 
cancerous changes from smoking 
may be effectively treated with 
the laser. 



CHOOSE VICTORY. 

Find out if you are a 
candidate for. laser or . 
endoscopic surgery. For 
a referral to a physician, 
calll-HOO-THE CHOICE 
(l'8(m-R43'2464), Monday 
Friday, fi ani-5 pmT^f 




VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

j 1324 North Sheridan Road • Waukegan Illinois 60085 

A Tolul Quality Muniigcntciii Or^anifuiiun 



' 



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4 Lakeland Newspaper* 



Friday, October 1,1993 



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Saint Therese 
Hospital 



DEPRESSION SCREENING— Saint Therese Medical 
Center, 2615 Washington St., Waukegan, will offer free 
Depression Screening Programs on Thursday, Oct. .7 at 
the hospital, Oct. 7 is National Depression Screening 
Day and Saint Therese joins hospitals across the country 
in offering the screening. Developed at Harvard Univer- 
sity, the program includes a self-administered evalua- 
tion, a short presentation and a video on depression. 
The screenings are scheduled from 3 to 5 p.m. and 
again from 7 to 9 p.m. For more information or to regis- 
ter, call 244-5900. 

DIABETES — "Viviendo con Diabetes" (Living with Dia- 
betes), a self-help group for Spanish speaking persons 
with diabetes, will meet the third Wednesday of each 
month, 7 p.m. in the Private Dining Room at Saint 
Therese. Call 360-2170 or 360-2061. 

CARDIAC CARE — The Cardiac Care Club will meet the 
third Thursday of each month, 7 p.m. at the Heart Cen- 
ter of Lake County. This educational and social group 
will provide information about heart disease, choles- 
terol, stress management and other related topics. For 
more information call, 244-5900. 



Victory Memorial 
Hospital 



NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS— Meets every Monday at 8 
p.m., at Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegan. No registration required. Call 360-4090. 
for information. 

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS— Support group meets 
every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. No 
registration required. Call 360-4148 for information. 

FAMILIES ANONYMOUS— Support group meets every 
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., at Victory Memorial Hospital., 
1324 N. SheridanRd., Waukegan, No registration 
required. Call 360-4090 for information. 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS— Support group meets 
every Fridayat 8 p.m., at Victory Memorial Hospital., 
1324 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. Call 360-4090 for 
information. 



Lake County 
Health Department 



MENTALLY ILL — The Lake County Health Depart- 
ment Division of Mental Health offers an evening 
weekly support group for parents and family members 
of mentally ill individuals. This is a free service for Lake 
County residents through the Coordinated Area Treat- 
ment Services (CATS) Program, 1819 27th Street, Zion. 
Arrangements for attending the group can be made by 
calling 872-4245 Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. 

AIDS/HIV TESTING — The Lake County Health Dept 
offers free anonymous and confidential AIDS/HIV test- 
ing at its Belvidere Medical Building facility, 2400 
Belvidere Rd., Waukegan. Testing is by appointment 
only. For more information on AIDS /HIV testing, or to 
make an appointment, call the Health Dept. at 
360-6891. 

COUNSELING — The Lake County Health Dept. Mental 
Health Division offers walk-in and telephone crisis 
counseling and referrals for Lake County residents ex- 
periencing emotional stress. This is a service of the Co- 
ordinated Area Treatment Services (CATS) Program at 
1819 27th St., Zion. Counselors are available after 5 p.m. 
weekdays and around the clock on weekends. For assis- 
tance, call 872-4242. 

FREE PROGRAMS —Child Health Conferences, or 
Well- Baby Clinics, are held each month in Zion, North 
Chicago, Round Lake and Waukegan. Parents who wish 
to bring their children must call 360-6731 for an ap- 
pointment The Special Supplemental Food Program 
for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) provides sup- 
plemental foods and nutrition education to mothers 
and their children under 5. For an appointment, call 
360-6781, The Prenatal Clinic offers medical care and 
health education during pregnancy to qualified 
low-Income women. For an appointment, call 
360-6715. 

SCREENING — The Lake County Health Dept. offers 
confidential walk-In clinics for the screening and 
treatment of sexually transmitted diseases each week at 
the following times and sites: Mondays from 12:30 to 3 
p.m., 10th Street Medical/Dental Building, 701 10th St, 
North Chicago. On Tuesdays from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at 
Belvidere Medical Building, 2400 Belvidere Rd., 
Waukegan. On Thursdays, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at 
Belvidere Medical Building, 2400 Belvidere Rd., 
Waukegan. Fees are on a sliding scale determined by 
ability to pay, however, no one will be refused 
treatment due to inability to pay. For more information 
call the Health Department at 360-6520. 



Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers' LIFELINE 




.■-.'.- 

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' r^Nllf ' 




M 







Sheila Maliekel, M.D. 

Board Certified in Internal Medicine 

and Critical Care Medicine 




Sandra Dempsey, M.D, 
Board Certified in Internal Medicine 
and Board Eligible in Endocrinology 



Sheila Maliekel, MJ). 

and 

Sandra Dempsey, M.D. 

are welcoming patients at their 

new office 

located in the 

Victory Medical Building 

Walden Square 
100 N.Atkinson Road, Suite 205 

(corner of Center St. and Atkinson Rd.) 

Gray slake, Illinois 

For more information or to make an 
appointment, call (708) 223-2006. 



Drs. Maliekel and Dempsey also have offices 

located at Greenleaf Center 
3 South Greenleaf, Suite A, Gurnee, Illinois 



.-•..'si 




"It was 2 a.m. and my daughter had a 
103° fever, I called ASK-A-NURSE." 



•• As a new mom, I need reassurance about the best way to care for my daughter. It's a relief 
to know that Saint Therese can help answer health care questions- day or night. Thank you 
Saint Therese for this wonderful and much-needed service. 59 

-Sue Basinger and her daughter of Lindenhurst 




Saint Therese Medical _ — __ n All l»f E~ statfed by re 9 istered nurses 

Center's ASK-A-NURSE is a /Y5lv/Vl\IUI\Z)Ju who ar e specially trained to 

free 24-hour health infor- w/\/v/% help you find a P h y sician » and 

mation and physician referral //L^L ^Ollll P rovide nealtn care 

service. ASK-A-NURSE is £* I I ~3 ^7\J\J information. 




Saint Therese Medical Center 



D 1992. Saint Theic&o Madtcal Center 



A Division of Franciscan Sisicrs Health Care Corporation 

2615 Washington Street 

Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

Telephone 708.249.3900 



Lakeland Newspapers 5 






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LIPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



GET "IT" OFF YOUR CHEST (708)223-8073 



:••! 



Lipservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no 
claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland 
Newspapers does not claim the content or the subject matter 
as fact, but as the personal opinion of the caller. Lakeland 
Newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain from 
printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 and leave your 
message 24-hours a day. Although the call is anonymous, • 
please leave your village name: 

Up, up, and away 

Every year, Trinity Lutheran releases balloons into the 
atmosphere apparently not caring that this practice 
endangers wildlife and pollutes the environment. It is hard 
to understand why a religious Institution has so little regard 
for God's creation. 

More Vikings 

I am from Antioch and I am upset that there is never any 
word in the paper about the Antioch Vikings Football 
Team. They have won it all for the past three years and 
their first game this year, they blew their opponents out of 
the water 44 to nothing. I think we should show our young 
guys that we are alive. 

Editorial note: Dear reader, the sports 
editor would be happy to print items about the 
Antioch Vikings Football Team. However, we 
do need to have scores, statistics, etc... sent 
in a timely fashion. Please send all sports 
submissions to Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. 
Whitney Street, Grayslake, IL 60030, Attn: 
Tom Stevens, Sports Editor. 

Uneasement 

I would like to thank Mr. Welton and the Village of 
Gurnee. We are still upset the vacating of the property 
running adjacent to the Prairie Oaks Subdivision. It has 
been an easement for 45 years. We did not get any 
notification. The people who now own it are not taking 
care of it. It does not seem to matter that we took care of it 
for 13 years. 

Good pay 

There it goes again. Some clown again complaining 
about some other clown complaining about teacher's 
salaries. I just Figured out in the Round Lake School 
District that they make $21.30 an hour when you consider 
days and time off. So, don't be telling me that teachers 
don't make any money. Get a different job if you don't Hke 
it! 

Still searching 

I am the one who called about the Shaw Subdivision 



'eOMMEg^ 

Serving 
The 

IMV 

«area 

Since 
1946 



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Duano Laska 

I IB I UV Ctwnfrw Ikard Qnlrmin 
Mot* Kta» Sfcn, UmivB* 



FROM THE CHAMBER OFFICE 

At last, the President's long anticipated Health Care reform 
package has finally been unveiled. And, while it may be 
welcome to some, the mere thought of it Is quite 
discomforting to others. 

Either way, it holds the potential to have more impact on 
the business sector of this country than either the industrial 
revolution or the great depression. 

But, looking at the bright side, the fun part now begins, as 
the debate season is now officially open on this topic. The 
expected and protracted debates, hopefully, will answer the 
ultimate and Important question of how this 'reform" will be 
paid for. 

Early Implications and indications from the White House 
have been that the "cookie jar" to be raided this time will, 
once again, be the one commonly labeled the 'Business 
Sector". 

And, If it's either direct added costs, higher tax limits, or 
even hidden taxes on the goods and services we provide, 
the bottom line is that business, large or small, like It or not, 
will be a major player in attempting to make this dream a 
reality by providing the wherewithal to do so. 

Pros and cons aside, what Is important at this time is for all 
businesses to become involved In the decision process, 
discussions and debates. 

Your letters to our Senators and Representatives on how 
what is proposed will affect you is Important, and CAN make 
a difference. 

We might as well have a say In what will be 
forthcoming— we're going to be paying for it. 



robberies. I have been waiting, and buying newspapers 
looking for my call. Is this just to sell newspapers or do 
you have something to hide? 

Editorial note: Dear reader, we really try to 
get everyone's calls in or at least offer an 
explanation about why we did not print it. 
Please keep trying. 

The eye of the beholder 

Why all the excitement about the fake art at the college? 
If the experts had not come in and told us it was fake, 
people would have looked at it and enjoyed it 

Early curfew 

I believe it is right to have your kid in early at night. 
But, 8:30 p.m. does seem a bit early to put your kid to bed. 

A trick 

The mayor of Fox Lake made the statement that he was 
against the asphalt plant. That was so that we would stay 
home and think it is all over with. They do not want us to 
go to the meeting on Wednesday. ' 

Charity at home 

I have just learned that the Community Protestant Church 
in Mundelein is sponsoring the arrival and support of a 
Somalian family with 17 children. They are requesting job 
placement, tutorials, housing, and electrical appliances 
including television sets. With several million Americans 
without jobs and thousands who are homeless, I think we 
need to adjust our priorities. Charity begins at home! 

Good turnout 

. I am calling to say how absolutely thrilled I was at the 
fabulous support and turnout for the meeting of the school 
district referendum committee on Sept. 13. So many of our 
friends and neighbors came together in support of the new 
school in District 118. 



Very bugged 



I am so upset with my daughter's bus driver. The other day 
their teacher told the children to bring bugs to school for a 
project. My daughter tried to get on bus with her bug in a 
covered container and the bus driver had a fit. What is the 
big deal about bringing a bug on the bus? Can someone tell 
me? 

Bitter 

Mr. President. What is the matter with you?. We have 
little Mexico right here. Why can't we all stay put? I am 
very bitter. 

Editorial note: Dear reader, unless you are an 
American Indian, you too came from somewhere 
else at some point. 

Big mistakes 

This is to the cluster of kids who stood around and cheered 
the fight on Sept. 19. Guys and girls, I don't think any of 
you understand how permanent death is. To scream kill 
him, kill him I If he had killed him, your friend would have 
been in jail for the rest of his life. For what? For 10 
minutes of anger? Many people have completely ruined 
their lives for 10 minutes of stupidity. 

Keep your focus 

I want to thank all the volunteers who are helping to get 
the new lower grade school built in District 118. Please do 
not lose focus on the needs of the children. 

Cat control 

Cat problems are almost always the result of 
irresponsible owners. Many people allow their pets to 
roam or refuse to have them spayed or neutered. People 
have to realize that cats are predators and carnivores. You 
cannot change their basic nature. I am a cat lover from 
Wauconda. 

(Continued on page 22). 



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Your Place For Good Health. 



..i,-.^,,..rAAW»: 




FLU SHOTS, FREE SCREENINGS, FREE REFRESHMENTS, & 

A CHANCE TO WIN A COLOR T.V. AND OTHER PRIZES! 

8 AM -12 NOON • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15 AND SATURDAY OCTOBER 16, 1993 



Health Fair Exhibitors 

McHcnry County Department or Health- 
Flu Shots: $5 Reservations are required. 
Call 815/455-8400. Must be 18 Years or Older. 
Nutrition Counseling. Adult Tetanus and 
Diphtheria Shots: $5. 

Information on Self Breast Exams and Mammography 
Memorial Hospital- 
Cholesterol Screening: $6 Charge 
Center For Women's Health Care— 
Height and Weight Checks ■ 
Sherman Hospital— Sherman Benefit Manager- 
Blood Pressure Screenings 
Good Shepherd Hospital— Senior Passport- 
Medicare Counseling 



Corey M. Wilson, DDS, P. Kevin Wilson, DDS- 

Oral Cancer Screenings 

Crystal Lake Hearing Aid, Best Aid, Inc.— 

Hearing Screenings 

Canterbury Care Center— Diabetes/Accucheck 

Tek Ambulance— Information Booth 

Childrens Area...(Saturday Only) 
Crystal Lake Police Department— 
Fingerprinting and Hand Outs 
Crystal Lake Fire Department— Fire Prevention 
Chicago Northwestern Railroad 
"Operation Lifcsaver"— Hand Outs and Railroad 
Safety Programs 

McHcnry County Health Department- 
Home Safety 



Your Place. 
Canterbury Place. 

965 N. Brighton Circle, Crystal Lakh, Illinois 60012 815 455 8400 
On Route 31, 1 mile North of Route 176 in Crystal Lake 



6 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 



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VFW craft show 

The Antioch VFW will hold a 
Holiday Craft Fair, Halloween, 
Thanksgiving and Christmas, on 
Saturday, Oct 23, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 
and Sunday, Oct. 24, 11 a.m. to 4 
p.m. at the Antioch VFW Post 4551, 
75 North Ave.i Antioch. For more 
information call 395-6934. 



Used book sale 

The Antioch Library Friends will 
sponsor a Used Book Sale at the 
Antioch Public Library, 757 Main 
St., Antioch, Friday, Oct 8, and 
Saturday, Oct 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Those who have books to donate 
can bring them to the library on 
Thursday, Oct 7 or call Marcia, 395- 
7006 for drop-off/pick-up arrange- 
ments. 

Fall bazaar 

The women of the United Methodist 
Church of Antioch will hold their 
annual Fall Bazaar and luncheon on 
Saturday, Oct 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 
p.m. at the church, 848 Main St., 
Antioch. The bazaar features a variety 
of crafts, jewelry, handmade items, 
holiday decorations and home baked 
goods. A Beef Ragout luncheon with 
dessert and beverage is $5 per platen 
S3 for children 10 and under, or 
children may request a hot dog plate. 
It will be served 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Dessert and beverage only will be 
$1.50. 



Candy day 



The Antioch Lions Club Candy 
Day is scheduled from noon on 
Friday, Oct 8 until 6 p.m. and from 8 
a.m. until noon Saturday, Oct. 9. 
They will be collecting funds on those 
dates to help support the sight and 
hearing impaired and diabetics. 

PADS 

On Oct. 3, the sixth season of 
PADS will begin. PADS provides 
cold weather shelter to the homeless. 
Last year, over 1,000 people were 
given food and shelter at the Antioch 
site. The location, in Antioch is the 
United Methodist Church on Route 
83. 

Firefighters 

Four Antioch firefighters have 
completed their probation and arc now 
Certified Firefighter's II. 
Congratulations to David Hanson, 
John Lucas, Bryan Mcisngcr, and 
Michael Stanek. 

Fundraiser success 

A letter of appreciation was sent to 
the Village of Antioch from the 
American Cancer Society to thank 
them for their efforts in the 1st 
Annual Ride for Bill Brook. 
According to the letter, more than 
$5,500 was raised. The money will 
be used for research, patient education, 
and service to patients. 



Lakeland Newspapers 




« . -- ■ -• 



Turn hi in' down 



The first buildings came down along Depot Street as 
workers begin to make way for the Orchard Street 
extension. All the buildings were expected to be down 



by Monday. The Orchard Street extension is part of 
Phase 1 of Antioch's revitalization plan.— Photo by 
Claudia M. Lenart 



Residents object to ball fields site 



by ALEC JUNGE 
Lakeland Newspapers 

A group of residents from Grass Lake 
Road came to the Lake Villa village board 
meeting to express their concerns about 
traffic and noise from proposed baseball 
fields at the Sun Lake Forest Preserve. 

Lake Villa Twp. Baseball wants to 
construct three or four baseball fields on 
the Sun Lake Forest Preserve. Rich 
Coles, director, said the league needs a 
place to insure that all kids get 
represented. 

"The whole reason we need the ball 
park is we have to go to school districts 
and park districts and semi-beg for use of 
their facilities," Coles said. "If one of 
them won't let us use their facilities, we 
may have to cut back on the number of 
kids we can allow." 

A petition was signed by over 10 
residents from Grass Lake Road according 
to Marcia Kulp. She read a letter to the 
board expressing a laundry list of concerns 
ranging from a desire for an alternative 
site away from Grass Lake Road, no 
public address system, no lights and no 
concession stand. 

Trustee David Dykstra said the board 
cutting the amount of homes in the 
Painted Lakes development and providing 
a place for recreational fields was a nice 
compromise that would benefit the 
community as a whole. 



"We thought it was a much better 
situation to take away 1800 units which 
would have had a significant impact on 
traffic with the expansion in return for a 
few playing fields to give pur youth 
something to do," Dykstra said. "We got 
rid of a good deal of congestion and 
density." 

Residents objected to what they 
considered adding more traffic at a time 
when the traffic is most congested. 

"None of you live on Grass Lake Road 
and don't understand the traffic; it's as 
busy as (Route) 83 and 173," said resident 
Floyd Whitney. "The church on Grass 
Lake Road has had several near misses. 
There is a dip in the road where you want 
to put the entrance." 

Coles said safety is of prime concern 
for baseball officials. "Every car driving 
in and out of the ballpark has at least one 
child in it." 

Coles answered questions and concerns 
from residents. Of prime concern was a 
public address system and how loud it 
would be. 

"We don't want it too loud because the 
. neighbors will complain and that's what 
we're trying to avoid," Coles said. 

Residents questioned why another site 
couldn't be found and existing sites 
couldn't be used. 

Mayor Frank Loffredo said many other 
sites arc too heavily wooded or on sloped 
land. Coles said existing areas have the 



problem of competing with soccer. Coles 
said the soccer programs and baseball need 
different fields to accommodate the 
different activities and so both leagues 
have facilities. 

"We arc being pushed out as the 
league grows. We need to have a place of 
our own to get self-sufficient," Coles 
said. 

There are over 700 kids in Lake Villa 
Twp. baseball. They plan to use the fields 
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on weekdays and 
Saturdays from 9 a.m. to about 11 a.m.. 
The leagues would run from about May to 
Early July. Some of the older kids, about 
four teams in the pony and colt leagues 
would play into July and would finish in 
early August, according to Coles. 

Presently the plan calls for four field 
on four acres of property. The forest 
preserve must approve the use of the 
facility. The proposal is going through 
various committees of the forest preserve. 
The league needs to provide proof they 
can financially operate the field. 

The league will provide the 
maintenance and finance construction of 
the fields. The village would provide the 
policing of the area. 

The league's next meeting was planned 
for Thursday, Sept. 30, at 7 p.m. at the 
Sl Thercse Satellite Center. Residents 
concerned about the site can view the site 
plan and discuss issues with baseball 
officials. 



ACHS referendum sets up hotline 



by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The ACHS Referendum Committee has 
set up a hotline for residents who have 
questions about the upcoming education 
fund referendum. After several District 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Lakeland (usps 027-obo) 

Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Otic* of Publication: 30 South Whilnay St., Giayslnke, IL 
60030. Phoiw (708) 223-6 16 1. 

Pubfahcd WMkJy, Mcond class postage paid at Grayslafc*. 
I L 60030. 

Mail Subscription Rata*: '16.50 Par Yaar by Mall paid In 
advanc* in Laka, Cook Kanosha and McHanry Count**; 
abawhare "27.00 Par Yaar by Mail paid In advanc*. 

Postmaatar: Sand addrass changes to Antioch News- 
Raportsr, 30 South Whlinay Straat. P.O. Box 2fl». Qraya- 

lika, Illinois 6003Q. 

(708)223-8161 



Antioch Newt-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundeteln Newi 
Grayslake Timet 



Vernon Hills Now* 
Round Lake News 
Wauconda Leader 
Ubertyvllle Newt 
LlndenhurstNews 



Fox Lake Preit North Chicago Tribune 

Gumee Press Warren-Newport Press 

M.R. SCHROEDER 

Foundtr-1904-1986 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publab»rfPraskJ*nt 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Gtmnl UMtmgtt 

jaDtMSQUAiE. bob samara mm* Roberts 

J0DAVS SHARON 2ASAM. EUZABETH EKRT 



117 referendum defeats, this referendum 
steering committee is committed to 
providing as much factual information as 
possible to the voters prior to November 
2. 

The hotline number is 395-8991, 
Voters can dial this number, leave a 
message, and a volunteer from the 
referendum committee will return the call 
within 24 hours. 

The referendum seeks a 27 cent tax 
rate increase for the Antioch Community 
High School's education fund. The 
increase would cost homeowners 
approximately $80.55 a year for a home 
with a fair market value of $100,000 and 
more for homes valued higher. 

The goal of the hotline is to assist 
voters in the decision making process by 
providing more information to the public. 
It is the perception of some residents that 



past refcrendums have failed because of a 
lack of communication with the 
community and incorrect information 

'It is the intention of the 
committee to get as much 
information as possible out to 
the public. ' 

—Laurie Chrlstopherson 

being disseminated to the public. The 
hotline is an attempt to correct this 
problem. 

"It is the intention of the committee to 
get as much information as possible out 
to the public," said Laurie 
Christopherson, chairperson of the 
publications committee. . "That way, 
voters can really make an informed 
decision." 



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Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 7 



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Jo Anne Weber is a grandma for first time 



First born 

Another proud grand- 
mother conies into being. 
Jo Anne Weber is overjoyed 
with the birth of her first 
grandchild. Her beautiful 
daughter and son-in-law, 
Theresa and Kevin Kovach, 
presented her with this spe- 
cial blessed bundle of joy 
on Monday, Sept. 13 at 9 
p.m. Little Miles Matthew 
weighed in at 8 lbs. 10 oz. 
and was bom at Lake Forest 
Hospital. A little birdie told 
me that Uncle Matthew We- 
ber is extremely happy to 
have the title of "Uncle" and 
he can't wait till Miles can 
crawl and walk. Congratula- 
tions, everyone. 
Craft fair 

One final reminder to 
circle Saturday, Oct. 23 on 
your calendars. This is the 
date of the Student Assis- 
tance Program Craft Fair. 
There will be 50 crafters on 
hand displaying their beauti- 
ful wares in the Antioch 
High School north gym, 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
There will also be a deli- 
cious bake sale and many 
beautiful items available for 
raffle. The proceeds from 
this craft fair will benefit 
ACE-ALPHA-Red Ribbon 
Week-and the Pre-prom 
Safety Program. This is a 
perfect time to pick up 
some special holiday decora- 
tions and Christmas gifts. 
Don't miss it! 
Special lady 

On Thursday, Sept. 16, 
Bernie Keefer was honored 
at Grass Lake School. 
Bemie recently retired after 



serving as the school's 
bookkeeper for twenty 
years. She was a dedicated, 
conscientious worker who 
only missed a small handful 
of days of work in her entire 
twenty years at Grass Lake 
School. Bernie's two sons, 
Tim and Rick, are former 
Grass Lake students having 
attended from kindergarten 
through eighth grade. 

The evening's festivities 
began with the tree 
dedication ceremony and 
Bemie told me she loves the 
tree and the location where 
it was planted. The Board 
President, Donald Fechtner, 
presented her with a beauti- 
ful plaque. She was also 
given a 1992 school year- 
book autographed by the 
students and a gift from 
PTO. Mrs. Rubash's Quest 
Group sang the Bemie Song 
and then everyone relived 
twenty years of memories 
with Bernie as they chatted 
over coffee and refresh- 
ments. 

Yes, Bernie, you will be 
missed and never forgotten. 
Thanks for the wonderful 
memories. 

Thank you 

It definitely pays off, in 
more ways than one, to 
work in the Camp Crayon 
Program surrounded by 
many beautiful 3, 4 and 5 
year old girls, and announce 
that this outfit or that outfit 
would look great on your 
20-month old granddaugh- 
ter, Once again little Paige 
Majewski presented our lit- 
tle Alyssa Janelle with a 
box of her beautiful, like 



new, out grown shoes. 
Once again we thank her 
graciously and openly for 
her generosity. Alyssa re- 
ally liked them, Paige, and 
can't wait until she grows 
into them. Thank you. 

Hometown 
Goodies 




LtZ SCHMEHL 
395-5380 



Special performance 

The PM&L Theatre in 
Antioch will be featuring a 
special fundraising produc- 
tion of "Give 'Em Hell, 
Harry" on Friday and Satur- 
day, Oct. 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. 
and Sunday, Oct. 10 at 2:30 
p.m. This play revolves 
around reminiscences of 
Harry S. Truman and stars 
Bud Caldwell. Reservations 
can be made by calling 395- 
3055. 

Our lady 

Tuesday, Sept. 14, was 
the second day the fall ses- 
sion of Camp Crayon was 
in session and a visit from 



Exchange club sponsors 
SHARE/Foods program 



It's as easy as 1 -2 -3! 
To save 40 to 60 percent on 
groceries each month on 
items such as potatoes, 
corn, oatmeal, bread, 
turkey, crackers," pasta, 
celery, cookies, rice and 
peas, sign-up, volunteer and 
pick-up. 

This is how it works: 
The Exchange Club of An- 
tioch buys each package of 
food worth at least $40 for 
$15, and' sells it to you for 
$15. All that's asked is that 
you give two hours of 
community service to a 
school, church or any non- ' 
profit agency. For example 
you can help distribute the 
SHARE/Foods one Satur- 
day morning each month. 

To sign up for this pro- 
gram, bring $15 to one of 
the following locations by 
1 p.m. Oct. 9, and/or Nov. 
6 for pickup on Oct. 23 and 
Nov. 20 respectively: State 
Bank of Antioch, 440 Lake 

ffictionVCRl 

S Repair Service ! 



St., Antioch; First National 
Bank of Antioch; 485 Lake 
St., Antioch; Lake Villa 
Township Office, 37908 N. 
Fairfield Rd. t Lake Villa; 
State Bank of Antioch, Lin- 
denhurst Facility, 2031 E. 
Grand Ave., Lindenhurst 

Pick up will be on Oct. 
23 and Nov. 20 at the Anti- 
och Veteran's of Foreign 
Wars (VFW) Hall, 75 North 
Ave., Antioch from 10 to 
10:30 a.m. 

You can place more 
than one order. Everyone 



can participate. 

For more information, 
you can call the Coordina- 
tors, Claudette Skvarce, 
395-6744 or Ardeen Harris, 
395-2761 or Yolanda 
Obermaier, 395-7554. 

Additional monthly 
dates are posted in busi- 
nesses around Antioch or 
call one of the numbers 
listed above or stop by one 
of the places of application. 

Make your food budget 
stretch through 

SHARE/Foods. 



one of our recent graduates 
made it even more special. 
Kaite "our lady" Turner 
stopped in to say hi and ex- 
tend her world famous hugs 
on her way to afternoon 
kindergarten. She looked 
beautiful and all grown up, 
with her hair done in two 
beautiful French braids and 
wearing a beautiful green 
jumper and blouse. We love 
you, Kaite, and that kinder- 
garten teacher is lucky to 
have you aboard. Please 
visit again. 

Belated wishes 

I would like to extend a 
happy belated birthday wish 
to Susie Baird who cele- 
brated her 35th birthday on 
Monday, Sept. 13. She en- 
joyed a relaxing meal at 
Baker's Square with her two 
sisters while the little ones 
were at Camp Crayon. I 
would also like to wish 
Debbie and Jim Foerster a 
belated happy ninth wedding 
anniversary. They celebrated 
this special day on Sept. 
15, the same wonderful day 
as the Lizard's birthday. 
Board meeting 

The Sept. 14 Grass 
Lake School Board Meet- 
ing/Budget Hearing was 
well attended. The follow- 
ing items were discussed 
and/or approved at the meet- 
ing. John Gollon was ad- 
ministered the oath of office 
as a new board member; 
FY94 budget was approved; 
reviewed some board poli- 
cies; approved the hiring of 
Gary Everett as music 
teacher and Tracy Jonltes as 
lunchroom supervisor; up- 
dates were received from 
Sally Hiller on SEDOL, 
Cindy Marquart on the 
Recognition Committee and 
Superintendent Ruth Bill on 
the playground progress; 
approved a resolution desig- 
nating Sept. 16, as Bernie 
Keefer Day. The next 
scheduled meeting of the 
Board of Education is Tues- 
day, Oct. 12 at 7- p.m. in 
the Media Center at the 
school. 
Wonderful memories 

I would like to thank all 
of my friends, wonderful ac- 
quaintances and loving fam- 
ily for all of the beautiful 
cards I received in honor of 
my 50th birthday. I was 
also treated to two wonder- 
ful celebrations, an evening 
out to dinner at the Old 



Country Buffet and after- 
wards a visit to Zannie's 
Comedy Club in" Liber- 
ty yi lie. Then my family 
members, including our lit- 
tle Alyssa Janelle, assem- 
bled at granny's house for a 
relaxing family dinner, 
friendly conversation and 
fun games. 

Thank you one and all 
and I hope I don't leave 
anyone out, Donna 
Schmehl, Dennis Bergl, 
Barbara, Dan and Alyssa 
Filips, Karen Schmehl, 
Michael Okalita, Jim 
Schmehl, Sr. and Jr., Marie 
Brausam, Dawn Hanich, 
Darlene Olenick, JoAnn 
Bergl, Linda Boerman, 
Mary Theel, Celia Bennett, 
Sylvia Vaughan, Russ 
Fairchild, JoAnne Weber, 
Lois McDonna, Lorraine 
Smiles, Grace and Rich 
Tierney. Everyone was 
great! 

Talented Sisters 

Once again the Mc- 
Carthy sisters entered the 
"Kids Month" coloring con- 
test at Osco, sponsored by 
Crayola Crayons. Once 
again their artistic talents 
made them winners. Little 
three-year-old Emily won in 
her age group and received a 
Crayola "Beginners Bucket" 
art set consisting of many 
beautiful crayons, markers 
and colored chalk. Five- 
year-old Megan received a 
crayola caddy for winning in 
her age category. Emily and 
Megan, now you have even 
more art supplies to help in 
creating your beautiful pic- 
tures. Congratulations and 
keep coloring and painting. 

Lotus/forest 

The Back to School and 
Open House Night at Lotus 
School is Oct. 5 at 6:30 to 
8 p.m. Congratulations are 
in order for Matthew and Ja- 
son Janowicz for complet- 
ing the Antioch Summer 
Reading Program. Volun- 
teers are needed at Forest 



School for the "Reading I 
Fundamental Program on 
Oct. 21 and Dec. 7. This 
rewarding task involves dis- 
tributing books to students. 
Also a volunteer is 
needed at Forest for the 
Student Book Swap. This 
event involves coming to 
school three times a year for 
a couple of hours. If you 
can help in either of these 
areas, please call Lotus 
School at 587-7311. The 
response was terrific to 
joining the Fox Lake Dist. 
114 Communication 
Council to discuss matters 
of curriculum, school 
program and policy. If 
anyone else would like to 
participate, call 587-73 1 1. 

Happy birthday 

With October upon us, . 
it is once again time for my 
monthly birthday list. 
Happy October birthday to 
Leslie Bennett, Don Bergl, 
Jamie Brausam, Christy 
Charvat, Cathy Chinn, 
Tiffany Christopolus, Brian 
Dembinski, Larry Edelman, 
Jr., Russ Fairchild, Marc 
Fechtner, Dan Filips, Angie 
Grob, Sara Groh, Ryan 
Hansen, Eddie Lindstrom, 
Cari Maloof, Mary Mar- 
sich, Steve Marsich, Ursula 
Martens. 

Charissa Misch, David 
Mozal, Debi Mozal, Bobby 
Murrin, Joey Nava, Tommy 
O'Brien, Amanda O'Connor, 
Nicole Schaller, Meaghan 
Shannahan, Kirsten Smith, 
Paige Tybor, Erica Wagner, 
JoAnne Weber and Tommy 
Webel. 

This is also the 
Halloween month. 
Remember to stock up on 
that Trick-or-Treat candy in 
preparation of the calling of 
all the little ghosts and 
goblins. Also drivers, 
please drive with extra 
caution as all the little ones 
will be out and about on 
Halloween day and evening. 



mite Us 

Lakeland Newpapers wants to hear news of local 
people, events clubs, organizations, etc. Black and 
white photos are also 'welcome. Please send news 

• Items to Claudia M. Lenart 
at 30 S. Whit ney. Gravslake. 60030 



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8 Lakeland Newipapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 



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I 

by ALEC JUNGE " '.! 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The reaction among area superinten- 
dents regarding a possible new unit school 
district in Lake Villa is mixed, 

Some say the costs and the vast legal 
issues relating to such a move are im- 
mense and need to be considered and 
evaluated before any proposal is presented 
to voters in a referendum. Supporters of 
the plan hope to put the measure before 
the ballot in March. 

Ray Novak, Grayslake High School 
supt., said a concern is money. "A lot of 
what happens depends on what will be 
developed. If there is an industrial devel- 
opment east of Lindenhurst it could be a 
considerable loss of revenue which would 
be good for them and bad for us." 

Novak said the district would likely 
start out in debt because it would have a 
limited tax base because of the lack of in- 
dustrial base with limited funds available 
to the district The people living in the 
district would have to pay for bonds from 
their previous districts as well as pay for a 
new high school and fees to other districts 
for housing their students until the high 
school is built 

Dr. Don Skidmore, supt. of Antioch 
Grade School District 34, said the issue is 
really can they legally do what they pro- 
pose? Skidmore said the really tough 



questions complicate unit district plan 



u , 



questions haven't been answered. 

"Whether they even can do it is sus- 
pect The presentation was at best prema- 
ture, a lot of issues need to be made clear 
before any logic or sense can be made of 
it," Skidmore said. 

Legally it must be determined if the 
district would be allowed to follow state 

'All it takes is for one district to 
say no and it is dead.' 

■— Dr/ Don Skidmore, 

Dlst. 34 supt. 

guidelines which seem to apply for con- 
solidating and not forming a district The 
issue of how the assets and liabilities of 
affected districts are to be separated is a 
legal issue with no definite answer. Even 
if the laws transfer to the new district, 
Skidmore said Antioch wouldn't give the 
Oakland School building to the new 
district as the proposal suggests. 

Skidmore said, if required, the district 
would give the Lake Villa Unit District 
the equivalent money for the property ac- 
cording to percentage of the students in 
Oakland School. He said there are 362 
Lake Villa Twp. students and the district 
would have to give the unit district 3.2 
million, not enough to pay for the cost of 
a new elementary school. 

"There are pros and cons of the dis- 




Bernle Jung of the Jensen House serves up a Cornish hen at his Antioch 
restaurant. Jensen House is currently holding Oktoberfest. 

It's Oktoberfest time at 
Jensen House Restaurant 



trict," said Alan Simon, Lake Villa 
District 41 supt. "We don't know the real 
impact of the question and how much the 
community supports it is yet to be deter- 
mined." 

Novak said the direct impact on his 
district would probably be a wash between 
reducing the need for expansion and losing 
tax base. 

"There are 200 kids from Lake Villa 
Township that go to the high school. It 
would have an impact on the expansion 
but wouldn't be enough so we don't have 
to expand," Novak said. 

Kathy Fendel, Millburn District 24 
school board member who attended the 
meeting where the proposal was presented 
to area superintendents, said an accommo- 
dation with the Warren High School 
District would have to be made for the 
district to allow the assessed valuation. 
Millburn school is in Warren Twp. She 
said the feeling she got from the meeting., 
was Wadswoith kids would go to Beach 
Park or Newport Schools. 

The proposal presented by Antioch 
school board member Joanne Osmond, 
and Joyce Henneberry calls for a unit 
school district from grades K to 12. The 
area would include Lindenhurst, Lake 
Villa, a good portion of Lake Villa Twp, 
and would incorporate the Oakland School 
buildings, Millburn District 24 and some 



by CLAUDIA M. LENART 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Area residents will be able to taste a 
variety of Deutschland delights at the 
Jensen House Restaurant's Oktoberfest, 
running now through Oct 31. 

Owner Bernie Jung, a native of 
Germany, is anxious to introduce people 
to German cooking and what better time 
than during the celebrated Oktoberfest. 

The special Oktoberfest menu will 
include Wiener Schnitzel with Spatzle, 
Schlacht Platte (sausage plate), Rouladen 
with red cabbage, roast duck with bread 
dumpling, sauerbraten with potato 
pancake, Bavarian roast pork with bread 
dumpling, and beef ala Deutsch. All 
entrees come with a choice of sauerkraut 
, or red cabbage, soup and salad and a 
choice of dessert — Pflaumen Kuchen 
(plum cake) or German chocolate cake. 

This will be the third Oktoberfest for 
the Jensen House. However, Jung has 
owned the restaurant since 1985. Prior to 
that, Jung spent eight years in the wine 
business and was a sous chef at Zum 



Deutschen Eck, a popular Chicago 
restaurant. 

Jung's first foray into cooking was as a 
chef in the Army. At that time, he hadn't 
yet heard his calling. "I rebelled against it. 
Even when I got out I wanted to be a 
computer programmer," said Jung. "But I 
was not cut out for desk work." Jung 
went on to attend Washburn Trade School 
in Chicago where he iearned the culinary 
arts. 

"My goal was always to own my own 
restaurant," said Jung. When the 
restaurant space became available, 
formerly the home of Antioch forefather 
Dr. George Jensen, Jung thought it was a 
good opportunity. 

"I enjoy cooking. I like to sec people 
happy. I like to get compliments. I also 
take constructive criticism," said Jung. 

The Jensen House hours arc Monday 
and Tuesday, 6 a.m.. to 3 p.m.; 
Wednesday through Sunday, 6 a.m. to 9 
p.m. For more information call 395- 
6474. The restaurant is located at Routes 
83 and 173. 



students from Antioch High School and 
Grayslake High School. 

The new district could raise the taxes 
on the district voters as high as $450 per 
resident according to Osmond. 

Novak said the legal issue may be one 
of the toughest hurdles. He said the group 
would need to get legal advice from a firm 
for free to help sort out legal questions 
and processes needed to get the district 

The state law provides and encourages 
unit districts but doesn't encourage a new 
district starting. He said there would be 
incentives for his district to take in the 
six elementary districts in his area while 
no such rule would apply for the new dis- 
trict 

The area superintendents are cooperat- 
ing in assisting the group with giving 
them information. 

"We will provide them with the in- 
formation and so they can have enough, 
information to have voters feel comfort- 
able making a decision," Novak said. 

What if the worst case scenario hap- 
pens, what if the referendum for a school 
district passes and the one for a new high 
school fails, what then?" Skidmore asked. 

Skidmore said all six affected districts 
need to approve a referendum before the 
district can exist "All it takes is for one 
district to say no and it is dead," said 
Skidmore. 



Residents hear district plan 



by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Lake Villa Unit District plan was 
presented to local residents at the Lake 
Villa Township Hall. Unit plan 
organizers, Joyce Henneberry and Joanne 
Osmond explained the costs and benefits 
of the plan to create a unit school district 
in Lake Villa. 

One of the benefits they discussed was 
the ability to coordinate the curriculum. 
Educators in Lake Villa have to prepare 
students for three different high schools. 

"When you have kindergarten through 
12th grade, you have one,administration 
controlling the educational program," 
explained Henneberry. "The math 
teachers in Lake Villa arc trying to 
coordinate a math program with three 
different high schools." 

Another benefit to Lake Villa residents 
would be that the community itself would 
have a focal point, the high school. 
Osmond also discussed the costs of 
creating a new district and building a new 
high school. Estimates of cost for a new 

Police Beat 



school is $25 million. It is predicted that 
it will cost an additional $21. million to 
educate students. 

If Lake Villa successfully creates a unit 
district school, all teachers in the district 
will become part of the same union 
bargaining unit. Elementary school 
teacher's salaries will have to be brought 
up to the level of the high school 
teachers. One suggestion to keep costs 
down is to negotiate with the high school 
teachers to stay at the same pay scale 
until the elementary teachers have been 
increased. 

"I think elementary teachers should be 
paid the same as high school teachers," 
said Osmond. 

If the plan makes the April 1994 ballot, 
voters would first be asked if they support 
the creation of the new district Then, 
they would also have to vote on the 
building of a new high school. According 
to organizers, it would be necessary for 
voters to vote yes or no on both issues. 

"If it makes the ballot we would have 
to vote yes, yes," said Osmond. 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven guilty tn a court of law 



ANTIOCH 

No Valid DL 

Anthony Condoluci, age 
29, of Trevor, Wisconsin 
was stopped on Route 173 on 
Sept. 27 for allegedly 
traveling 52 mph in a 40 
mph zone and a defective 
muffler. When stopped, he 
allegedly told officers that he 
did not have a drivers 
license. Condoluci was 
ticketed for speeding, 
defective muffler, and no 
valid drivers license. He was 
subsequently released on 
bond. 

Lawrence Watson, age 46, 
of Bristol, Wisconsin was 
arrested on Sept. 23 for 
driving without a valid 
drivers license. Watson was 
stopped by police on Route 
173 when they noticed a 
defective windshield. 
Watson was released on 
bond. 

DUI 

Allan Piispancn, age 22, of 
Antioch was arrested on 
Sept. 26 for DUI. Piispancn 
was stopped on Route 83 and 
Williams Street. He was 



processed and released on 
bond. 

Susan Szczcpaniak, age 35, 
of Antioch was arrested for 
suspected DUI on Sept. 27. 
Szczcpaniak, who was 
originally stopped for 
speeding, refused the 
breathalyzer test. 

James T. Zupan, age 23, of 
Spring Grove was arrested for 
DUI on Sept. 25. Zupan was 
stopped while traveling on 
Main Street in Antioch. 
.Zupan was released on bond. 

Douglas Burke, age 46, of 
Inglcsidc was arrested on 
Sept. 23 for DUI. Burke was 
stopped while on Route 59 
for driving 30 mph in a 45 
mph zone. 

Theft 

Three Chicago Bulls 
baseball caps, valued at 
$19.99 each were stolen on 
Sept. 25 from a local 
Antioch store. 

DWLS 

Lee Richards, age 25, of 
Wadsworth, IL was arrested 
on Sept. 25 for speeding, 
uninsured vehicle, and 



driving on a suspended 
license. Richards was 
released on bond. 

Michael Roszak, age 33, of 
Antioch was pulled over 
when he allegedly crossed 
over the solid white line on 
Route 173 on Sept. 24. 
Roszak was ticketed for 
improper lane usage and 
driving while license is 
suspended. 



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Friday, October 1 , 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 9 



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Summer readers 




District 34 held its summer reading program. Certificate winners who read 
1,000 minutes or more from first-grade, back row, are Michael Vitucci, Ian 
Ludwig, Aaron D. Kowalisyn, Amanda Tomasello, Alicia Chess, Sean 
Ranaldo, Stephanie Brinker, Jacob August, Ryan Walker, William Vos, 
Christine Korkowski, Kathleen Lee. Front row, from kindergarten are Bryan 
Vos, Julie Latham, and Scott McAlonan.— Photos by Gene Gabry 




Second and third-grade 1,000 minute readers: back row, Lauren Popp, 
Maggie Ludwig, Katie Latham, Kristen Karla, Ryan Holt, Jack Reardon, Lisa 
Korkowski, Ruth McAlonan, Mike Menzer, Johanna Horton, Nathan Brinker. 
Front row, Jerry Mahoney, Phillip Bednar, Suzanne Stelmaset, Michael 
Tiddens, Daniel Cfchon, Cara Anderson, Michelle Ranaldo, Christine Shea, 
Katy Fries. 




Petty fourth-graders who read more than 1 ,000 minutes were Jeffrey Danna, 
Connor Peavey, Jason Wegel, Sarah Perks, and Thomas Cichon. 



Referendum telephone 
poll to begin this week 



Lakeland Newspapers will begin to 
make over 300 calls to residents of 
Antioch Township and Lake Villa 
Township asking residents about their 
opinions concerning the upcoming 
education fund referendum for the Antioch 
Community High School. 

Professional telemarketers will be 
randomly calling residents to ask them a 
series of three questions. Respondents 
will be asked if they have school age 
children, whether or not they vote in any 
of the previous school referenda, and how 
they feel about the upcoming referendum. 



In November, voters will be asked to 
support a 27 cent tax rate increase for 
Antioch Community High School's 
education fund. The increase would cost 
approximately $80:55 a year for a home 
with a fair market value of $100,000 and 
more for homes valued higher. 

The telephone numbers will be 
randomly selected and will include 50 
percent of the newspaper's subscribers and 
50 percent non-subscribers. The results 
•of this unscientific poll will be printed in 
next week's edition. 



Youth network group 
finds new home in area 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

After 15 years of being headquartered in 
Lake Villa, the Community Youth Net- 
work staff is settling in at its new loca- 
tion near Grayslake. 

"With 4,300 square feet, we were able 
to design the interior to meet our needs," 
Bruce Rascy, executive director said. 

The public will have a chance to tour 
the facility during a 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.. 
open house OcL 4. 

The staff of 20 full-time workers and a 
handful of part-timers has grown since 
Ronald C, Hume started the agency in 
1978. 

"Our specially is sexual abuse cases, 
both victim and perpetrator," Rascy said. 

The effort which led to Community 
Service Network was started by Hume 
who coordinated cases of various 
providers. 

"The focus we have kept through the 
years is to avoid duplication of services," 



Rasey said. 

According to figures published in a 
1992 annual report, the largest age group 
of clients served is 15-18, with 24 per- 
cent; 26-35 is at 17 percent and 35-50, 15 
percent. Fifty-two percent of clients were 
female, 48 percent male. 

Waukegan and Avon were the leading 
townships while the city of Waukegan led 
other municipalities with Antioch second. 

Jerry Blain, associate director, said the 
referrals come from the Department of 
Children and Family Services, the court 
system, police and schools. 

Community Youth Network received 
50 percent of its funding from revenue 
sources, 30 percent from private fees, in 
1992. Other sources included a federal 
runaway and homeless youth project 
grant 

Some services arc free, some are on a 
sliding scale, others on a fixed basis. The 
agency is governed by an all-volunteer 
board of directors. 



Dist. 34 



(Continued from page 1) 
announcement that an AIDS infected 
student would be attending a local school 
this year. 

"We are extremely pleased with the 
reaction," said Skidmore. "Looking back, 

Referendum — 

(Continued from page 1) 

existing homes and new homeowners in 
the Heron Harbor and Fairway Estates 
subdivisions. 

"Interestingly, the big increase in 
students this year is a result of new 
residents moving into existing homes," 
said Tabar. 

The school, however, has been 
anticipating the need for more classroom 
space for some time. Officials and the 
school board have been waiting for the 
"right time" to bring a building 
referendum to the voters. 

"We hope the timing is right," said 



we know we did the right thing by going 
public. We were able to inform the 
public of the precautions we practice at 
the school, and now the community is 
more aware of the types of safety 
precautions they should practice." 



Tabar. "We have known it was 
inevitable." . 

Tabar does not think that the Lake 
Villa Unit School District proposal would 
have a substantial impact on the number 
of students attending Emmons School. 
According to Tabar, it would only reduce 
the school's attendance by six to eight 
students. 

Parents and community members are 
invited to an informal discussion of the 
future and Emmon's plans to deal with it 
The meeting will take place on Thursday, 
Oct. 7 at 7 p.m. at Emmons School. 



Procedures for write-in 
candidates discussed 



by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The school board for Antioch's District 
34 has four vacancies, yet only two 
incumbents have filed for positions. At a 
recent school board meeting, procedures 
for write-in candidates was discussed. 

"Basically, anyone who wants to run 
must file a Certificate of Intention to be a 
write-in candidate at the Lake County 
Election Board," explained Superintendent 
Don Skidmore. "This must be done by 
the Friday preceding the election." 

Candidates who follow this procedure 
would have until the end of the election 
day to file their conflict of interest form. 
If these procedures are followed, the 



school board would be obligated to- 
recognize the elected board member. 

The votes for any write-in candidate 
who does not follow these procedures will 
not be counted. 

There seems to be no particular reason 
why District 34 does not have enough 
candidates. It is speculated that attention 
is diverted to Antioch Community High 
School at this time. 

Furthermore, District 34 is not the only 
school in the area with this problem. In 
the Emmons School District out of five 
open positions, only three candidates have 
Filed. Emmons officials believe that the 
large number of openings is responsible. 



BEST 



(Continued from page 1) 

disseminated to the public and the press. 

"Our style is to distribute the 
information, pass it out to the voters to 
see they get the right information," 
explained Knutsen. "The community 
knows what we do." 

The survey, itself includes several 
questions concerning the upcoming 
education fund referendum and prior 
building referendums. There are also 
some general questions such as: "Do you 
believe the Public School System in its 
present 18th century mode can educate our 
children for the 21st century?" 
BEST plans to compile the information 



10 Lakeland Newspapers 



received from the candidates and make it 
available to the public and press. 

When asked about the purpose of the 
BEST organization, Knutsen explained it 
was a community group that puts 
together information about real estate and 
tax matters. According to Knutsen, none 
of the members are educators, real estate 
specialists, or even accountants. 

The organization does not have a not- 
for-profit standing, and it appears that 
most costs are borne out-of-pocket. 
Although, according to Knutsen the 
group is also "supported bj local 
donation." 

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Friday, October 1, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 



■ ■■ i - 



Lakeland Newspapers' EDITORIAL 



Home rule reality 



Letters to the 




Granting elected officials 
more taxing authority 
not a step to be taken 
lightly. 

Once again the old home rule solution is 
being trotted out to solve the problems of 
a troubled municipality. Granting home 
rule authority through referenda was one 
of the powers provided smaller villages 
when the Illinois Constitution was 
rewritten in 1970. 

This time it's the officials of Round 
Lake Beach asking voters for home rule 
authority in the Nov. 2 election. Under 
the constitution, municipalities of under 
25,000 population must adopt home rule 
by popular election. 

Home rule is a powerful tool for local 
government, providing elected officials 
with broad-based authority otherwise 
limited by statute. Advocates of limited 
municipal power regard nice-sounding 
home rule as a doubled-edged sword best 
kept sheathed. They fear its blank-check 
taxing power and expanded ordinance 
authority. And for good reason. In the 
wrong hands and unshackled, home rule 
can become a nightmare. 

Ironically, Round Lake Beach officials 

Question 
of money 

New unit school 
proposition offers 
advantages, but 
proposition hinges on 
cost 

There is a tendency to gloss over the 
web of legal entanglements connected 
with forming a unit school district not to 
mention nightmarish financial obligations 
that would be imposed on taxpayers in the 
new district. 

That seems to be the case with the 
proposed unit for Lake Villa and 
Lindenhurst that would include territory 
from four high school districts (Antioch, 
Grant, Grayslake and Warren) and three 
elementary districts, Lake Villa, Antioch 
and Millburn. 

Supporters of the innovative educational 
plan cite familiar benefits such as unified 
curriculum for grades K-12, elimination 
of duplicating administrative costs, 
busing efficiency and heightened 
community identity. The undeniable 
benefits basically can be lumped under the 
heading of social and political advantages. 
These gains have been the driving forces 
behind past Lake County school 
unifications producing single systems for 
Lake Zurich, Wauconda, Round Lake, 
Barrington and North Chicago, for 
example. 

Seldom, if ever, is the "urge to merge" 
spurred by financial reasons. Unification 
in itself doesn't seem to ease the financial 
burdens imposed on a community to fund 
public education. In the cases of Round 
Lake and North Chicago, in particular, 
unifying grade schools and the high 
school only served to magnify pre- 
existing financial woes. 

Unification normally imposes a debt 
burden that can take decades to erase. 
Taxpayers are enticed to "trade off' money 
problems for social and political gains to 
make unification fly. Getting "their own 
high school" is key to Lake Villa- 
Lindenhurst plan with an attendant $25 
million price tag for the district's high 
school building. 

At this early stage of debate, one has to 
wonder if residents and taxpayers in the 
proposed unit district are willing to accept 
additional burdens to the already heavy 
cost of public education. Many good 
things would come with a school 
unification, but the question still hinges 
on money. 



make no apoligies for pushing home rule 
to gain greater taxing authority. They 
insist that a previous administration left 
the village in such a financial mess that 
their only recourse is to find new revenue 
sources. Newly elected Mayor Ralph 
Davis describes Round Lake Beach 
finances as a hand-to-mouth. If home 
rule is adopted, Davis promises a half 
cent increase in sales tax to raise. much 
needed revenue for a starter. No one is 
accusing Mayor Davis of being less than 
candid. 

Whenever home rule is offered, voters 
should be made aware that the question is 
not about self determination, but raw 
power. Mayor Davis admits that home 
rule gives the village council blank check 
taxing authority. Realistically, he points 
out that the rapidly growing community 
will automatically acquire home rule 
power in the next three to five years when 
the population is projected to hit 25,000. 

Hopefully, this pragmatism will not 
rule out throughtful debate. In our book, 
voting in home rule is not a step to be 
taken lightly. 



NAFTA no bargain 

Editor: 

I urge a "noV vote on the upcoming 
NAFTA legislation. I am not a member 
of any union, now or in the past. 

We must increase our manufacturing 
base for better paying jobs for Americans, 
I'm tired of our elected officials rushing to 
the aid of other countries, whether it's 
economic or military, when we have 
needs at home. 

I believe that U.S. Corporations 
should be penalized for moving manufac- 
turing facilities (jobs) out of the United 
States, instead of being rewarded by our 
government 

I've heard an argument regarding Mex- 
ico, namely, that if we create enough jobs 
in Mexico we will reduce the number of 
illegal emigrants trying to cross over the 
border to America. These are separate 
problems and should be kept so, if we 
were to apply this thought process to con- 
trol emigration, it would in theory in- 
volve all "third world nations." 

Jack Collins 
Lake Villa 




-.; y.-.v ..-" : j ;-v-vvx -y.'s.- :■»:'}» 



Viewpoint 



by BILL SCHROEDER 

Jeff Ladd has a gift for making 
government work. 

Ladd not only has the ability to get 
things done, but he explains public 
service in understandable terms. No 
bureaucratic gobbledy-gook or political 
double speak. 

As head of Metra, the suburban rail arm 
of the Regional Transportation Authority 
(RTA), the resident of Crystal Lake has 
carved an enviable record in a 
comparatively short time. The former 
Chicago attorney didn't exacUy inherit a 
bed of roses. 

One of Ladd's favorite examples of the 
good a governmental agency can 
accomplish when managed properly is 
how Metra brought back the rail car 
building industry to Illinois and created 
jobs. Confronted with replacing worn out 
Metra cars a few years ago, Ladd said he 
was amazed to discover that all of the 
U.S. rail car makers had gone out of 
business. By insisting that a contract for 
purchase of new commuter cars be filled 
with Illinois labor, Ladd said an industry 
was revived with the ultimate value to the 
state economy exceeding the value of the 
contract. 

Ladd whipped up support for 
municipalities along the planned 
Wisconsin Central commuter route to 
build parking lots by laying down a "no 
park, no ride" dictum. Commuter service 
on the Wisconsin Central, due to begin in 



1996, is being built around an easily 
understood aim — the 50-45 plan, 50 miles 
in 45 minutes. 

With easily clear-cut goals and plain 
talk, Ladd gets things done at Metra. Too 
bad the suburban rail system might be 
losing a classy boss. Ladd is expected to 
toss his hat in the ring for Illinois 
attorney general for the 1994 election. 
**••••* 

DIAMOND MEMORIES— 

Mention in this column a few weeks ago 
about former Lake County residents who 
enjoyed White Sox careers prompted some 
calls with names of county athletes who 
made it to the big leagues. A quickly 
drawn list includes Grayslake's Jay Hook 
who pitched for the Mets and Redlegs; 
Zion pitcher Paul Erickson with the 
Cubs; the late Bob CFarrell of 
Waukegan, Cardinal catcher; Johnny 
McCarthy of Mundelein, a Giant first 
baseman before World War II, and current 
Dodger outfielder, Brett Butler of 
Libertyville. Did I miss anyone? 

**•*••* 

DEER CARDS— Original 
watercolors of deer scenes painted by 
Divida Terry for holiday greetings are 
being offered by the Ryerson Deer 
Foundation. 

Cards can be obtained by writing to Box 
747, Lincolnshire, 111., 60069, or calling 
708-821-DEER, 
The foundation is making progress in its" 
efforts to absolve persons from Dept. of 



Willing to pay more 

Editor. 

As residents of School Dist 118, my 
husband and I wholeheartedly support the 
referendum to build a new school for the 
students of our community. 

Our child is one of 27 students in 
eight fifth grade classes at Wauconda 
Grade School. With a projected increase in 
the elementary school population of sev- 
enty new students per year over the next 
five years, the board will have no choice 
but to seek "alternative solutions" to this 
significant overcrowding. 

An increase of just $3 per. month ($33 
per $100,000 home) or $35 annually is a 
very small price to pay to improve the 
quality of our children's education in a 
measurable way. By voting yes on Nov. 2 
we are showing our children just how 
much we value them. 

Mary Jo and Tom Martin 
Island Lake 

Propery tax seminars 

Editor: 

For three years I-RATE has conducted 
seminars to help taxpayers understand the 
property tax system so they might appeal 
their assessments. These have been taught 
by Dennis Jagla, who is now our Liberty- 
ille Township assessor-elect. 

The Libertyville-Mundelein League of 
Women Voters charges the same informa- 
tion is available for free in the assessor's 
office. Evidently, the taxpayers who keep 
coming to these seminars disagree. Sev- 
eral hundred have attended since our start. 
We have not seen the current assessor 
conduct a similar seminar. We wonder 
why the League has decided to make this 
charge now in the third year of these 
seminars? Perhaps they would like to tell 
us. 

Bruce E. Rodman 

I-RATE Secretary 

Libertyville 

(Continued on next page) 



mm 



Jeff Ladd can get things done 




Conservation penalties for helping 
suffering animals. Local legislators 
looking at new laws protecting 
humanitarians include State Sen. William 
Peterson (R-Prairie View), and State 
Reps. Lauren Beth Gash (D-Highland 
Park) and Vema Clayton (R-Buffalo 
Grove). 

•*•**•* 

PRAIRIE START— Dorothy 
Donnelley wilt be turning a symbolic 
spade of sod Wednesday afternoon, Oct 6, 
to signify the beginning of Prairie 
Crossing, an innovative residential 
development linking modern suburbia 
with Lake County's rural heritage. 

Blending upscale single family homes, 
townhomes, commercial facilities, 
agriculture and preservation of natural 
areas, Prairie Crossing will be a 
realization of a vision of Mrs. Donnelley 
and her late husband, Gaylord. The 
Donnelley home is nearby on Casey Rd., 
Libertyville. Prairie Crossing is a giant 
triangle of land east of Grayslake bound 
by Rtes. 45, 120 and 21. 

Gaylord Donnelley combined a career as 
head of the family's famed printing 
business in Chicago with leadership of 
the movement for environmental 
protection and open lands preservation. 




12 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



., i _—._.__. 



Lakeland Newspapers' OPINION 




if 

m 

•;■:■: ■:■:■:> 



16P CONCERNS 

«rjjS^ ■ Drugs' 

^ Violence 

Z Low academic standards - 

Quality of teachers <r~"/*"'W 
/j&&\ Poor curriculum - '/-\ 



SI 



■.■■.■>•■ 






Challengers not li 
to take 





SOURCE: The Gallup Orrj3ni?altak1$ 



Letters 



(Continued from preceding page) 

Nafta betrayal 

Editor 

The biggest economic disasters since 
World War II— Carter, Ford, Bush and 
Clinton — got together recently to endorse 
the North American Free Trade Agreement 
(Nafta). All Americans have to do is re- 
member what happened to the economy 
when these boobs were in power and 
they'll get the real story behind Nafta. 
Just like the recent budget had nothing to 
do with "deficit reduction," Nafta" has 
nothing to do with free trade and every- 
thing to do with One World Socialism. 



Nafta is really more protectionism 
directed by foreign bureaucrats who don't 
care about America and in some cases 
may not even speak English. 

It's not surprising John Porter is sup- 
porting Nafta. Our Congressman for life 
is an expert at talking conservative at 
home and voting for bigger government 
in Washington. But Nafta support by Phil 
Crane is a complete betrayal of a distin- 
guished career. If he votes to put Ameri- 
cans under the dictates of foreign bureau- 
crats, I'm sorry to say he will deserve to 
be voted out in the 1994 primary. 

Grant D. Noble, Chairman 
Lake County Term Limits 



Party Lines, Lakeland 
Newspapers column of political 
commentary, is prepared from 
staff reports. 

At least, three Republicans aren't giving 
a hoot for advice given by Presidential 
candidate Jack Kemp. 

Speaking at a fund raising luncheon for 
Congressman Phil Crane, Kemp 
told would-be Crane challengers: 

"Forget running against Phil Crane." A 
one-time associate of Crane in Congress, 
Kemp listed a flock of reasons why the 
new resident of Wauconda should be 
retained, including the fact that the veteran 
GOP Congressman is on the "cutting 
edge" of all the good ideas circulating in 
Washington. 

Expected to ignore Kemp and challenge 
Crane in 1994 are Gary Skoien, 
Palatine real estate executive; Judy 
Svenson, a Barrington attorney, and 
State Sen. Peter G. Fitzgerald of 
Inverness. 

Crane aides already are snickering about 
Fitzgerald's reported strategy of "writing 

Party Lines 

off Lake County" and concentrating on 
the Cook County side to win the 
nomination. In his 1992 victory, Crane 
got 45 percent of his votes north of Lake- 
Cook Rd. "How can Fitzgerald win 
without Lake County?" they ask. 
Whatever the competition, Crane isn't 
taking any challengers for granted. The 
luncheon featuring Kemp was the 
incumbent's first big public fund raising 
effort in recent years. It was worth about 




Crane 



Richardson 



$10,000. There'll probably be more. 

Rally love-in — Coroner Barbara 
Richardson is proof that politicians 
don't always have their hands out A $20 
per person picnic last Sunday was 
Richardson's first fund raiser in three 
years. Judy Fried, head of the Northern 
Illinois Council on Alcoholism and 
Substance Abuse put it this way: "We 
are all better for having shared in Barbara's 
concern, spirit, love and expertise." An 
example of Richardson's care for 
individual feelings was supplying tv's 
around the picnic grounds so Bear fans 
wouldn't miss a single play. 

Party divided — With two candidates, 
Lake County Republicans likely will be 
split over the nomination for appellate 
judge. Announced for the position are 
Circuit Judge Charles "Charlie" 
Scott and Associate Judge Barbara 
Gilleran- Johnson. Johnson, a 
resident of Long Grove, is the first 
woman from Lake County to run for the 
appellate bench. Scott resides in Fremont 
Township. 




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Friday, October 1, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 13 



^0 D\> jj teNNMs ^ t v EX £ */£ ^gi^ 



Now is time to teach children to love learning 



Learning is a process 
that begins at birth and 
lasts throughout a life- 
time. Learning cannot be 
turned on and off like a 
faucet, It is not limited to 
the classroom. 

The dictionary defines 
learning as gaming 
knowledge, understand- 
ing or skill by study or ex- 
perience. Young children 
are always learning, not 
always what you think 
they are learning, nor 
what you may want them 
to learn, but learning 
nevertheless. 

Most educators agree 
that how children are 
treated before age 3 will 
mold their future suc- 
cesses and failures in later 
life. According to child 
expert Dr. T. Berry Brazle- 
ton of Children's Hospital 
in Boston, "By school age, 
family and caregivers 
have already prepared the 



child for success or fail- 
ure." 

In most cases, chil- 
dren's first teachers are 
their parents. In recent 
years, however, working 
families are relying more 
and more on child care 
arrangements, often for 
children as young as six 
weeks of age. These par- 
ent-caregiver partnerships 
in child rearing empha- 
size something that 
preschool teachers have 
always known — care and 
education go hand-in- 
hand. A child is always 
learning whether by de- 
sign or by accident. 

For young children, 
every activity is a learning 
experience. They must 
Ieam to crawl, to walk, to 
talk, to share, to hug, to 
get along with their par- 
ents, their siblings, their 
teachers and with each 
other. 



Within each age 
group, there is usually a 
wide range of individual 
differences. A child with 
early verbal skills may be 
slow to ride a two-wheel 
bicycle; a child who reads 
at an early age may hand 
back when it comes to 
making friends. In all in- 
stances, it is important 
that each child be given 
the opportunity to learn 
and develop at his/her 
own pace. 

In order to maximize 
learning, children must 
be exposed to a variety of 
developmcntally appro- 
priate activities designed 
both for challenge and 
success. . 

Parents and teachers 
who read to young chil- 
dren are offering them not 
only an enjoyable experi- 
ence, they are teaching 
them the Importance of 
learning to read and the 



satisfaction that goes 
along with it. The same 
process takes place in 
other areas of learning. To 
help young children be- 
gin to develop mathemat- 
ical thinking, they need to 
be involved in simple 
number games activities 
that are meaningful to 
them and developmen- 
tally appropriate. 

Once children have 
mastered a task, they will 



often want to repeat it 
over and over again. With 
each success and with 
adult approval, they gain 
the confidence needed to 
go on to a new challenge 
and succeed at the next 
level. It is the responsibil- 
ity of every parent, teacher 
and community to pro - 
vide that ladder of learn- 
ing opportunity. 

Over the past few 



years, we, as a nation, 
have been questioning 
our priorities and our 
value systems. It is time 
for us to teach children of 
all ages to value the love 

• of learning by putting ed- 
ucation at the top of our 
national priority list. — by 

PATRICIA GOODMAN, 
Early Childhood Consul- 
tant President, Child Care 
Coalition of Lake County. 



Early childhood conference set to Oct. 16 



The Far North Chapter 
of the Chicago Assn. for 
the Education of Young 
Children and the College 
of Lake County are 
cosponsoring their annual 
fall conference on Oct. 16 
held at the College of 
Lake County from 8 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. The theme for 
this year's conference is 
"Celebrating Diversity in 



Programs for Children." 
More than 25 speakers 
will be presenting work- 
shops on such topics as 
multi-cultural music ex- 
periences, multi-cultural 
classroom activities, creat- 
ing appropriate environ- 
ments for infants and 
toddlers, science activi- 
ties. 

The keynote speaker 



will be Dr. Junko Yokota 
from the University of 
Northern Iowa. Dr. Yokota 
will speak on multi-cul- 
tural literacy experiences 
for children. 

Registration is needed 
by Oct 2 and can be made 
by call in Marge Col- 
ciough at 360-2733 for 
more information. Con- 
ference cost is $20. 




tiare 



BPIF 8 




— , . 1 r[ -.. nB1 | .. B , ......... J _. J . JC ...^ J _^ J . JJJ _^. 





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EYE SURGERY 

1-800-1 CAN SEE 

5400 West Elm Street, 

Suite 120 

McHenry, IL 60050 



Alan Chow, M.D. is a pe- 
diatric opthalmologist and 
eye surgeon who special- 
izes in diagnosing and 
treating children's eye and . 
vision disorders. He is also 
a Clinical Assistant Profes- 
sor at Loyola University 
Medical Center. 



14 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



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Helping your child understand differences 



Getting along with 
others is an important 
lifetime skill which needs 
to be encouraged when 
children are very young. 
Parents and teachers alike 
place great value on a 
child's ability to make 
friends and work out dif- 
ferences in positive ways. 

What many do not 
recognize, however, is the 
need for a child living in 
today's diverse world to 
get along with people who 
can be quite different. 
With each year, our coun- | 



try becomes* much more 
culturally diverse and a 
child needs to be helped 
to appreciate differences 
rather than be frightened 
by them. Diversity can be 
anything from a differ- 
ence in hair color, ability 
and size to more signifi- 
cant differences in skin 
color, family traditions 
and language. 

The need today is to 
help a child resist stereo- 
typing others through an 
appreciation of diversity 
as that quality that makes 
each of us unique and, 



therefore, special. This 
process begins far earlier 
than most parents may 
recognize. 

As early as six months, 
a child can observe differ- 
ences in color and ap- 
pearance. This is the time 
to use picture books and 
display colorful magazine 
pictures that show, a vari- 
ety of people of different 
colors, sizes and ages. 
Seeing pictures of people 
wearing glasses, using 
wheel chairs, wearing uni- 
forms and working in 



various settings will help a 
child get acquainted with 
diversity beyond what is 
available in the family 
setting. 

As early as 16 months, 
a child develops attitudes 
about these differences. 
This is the time to read 
and tell stories about dif- 
ferences in people that 
highlight positive charac- 
teristics and help a child 
understand that although 
people might look differ- 
ent, we all share the ability 
to be helpful, strong, 



brave, funny and sad. 

As children get older 
they begin to ask ques- 
tions about differences. It 
is important to answer 
honestly and objectively. 
A child may ask, "Why is 
her skin dirty?'' Rather 
than ignore the question 
or try to quiet the child, 
just explain, "It's not dirty; 
that is the color of her skin 
and it's different; it's what 
makes her special." 

Throughout child- 
hood we need to give ac- 
curate information to 



children. This means ex- 
amining our own feelings 

about differences in peo- 
ple and working to reduce 
or eliminate our own bi- 
ases. Stereotypes that de- 
velop in childhood will 
last a lifetime if we do not 
work to change them. 
They will interfere with a 
child's ability to get along 

with others throughout 
school and in later work 
settings.— by KATIE 
O'NEILL, Education Co- 
ordinator, Dearhaven 
I Child Care Center 



Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month through Oct. 15 



Hispanic Heritage 
Month is a month set 
aside to commemorate 
the contributions made by 
the Hispanics throughout 
our nation's history. On 
Sept. 17, 1968, President 
Lyndon B. Johnson signed 



a proclamation designat- 
ing that week as Hispanic 
Heritage Week. In 1988, a 
bill was passed creating 
Hispanic Heritage Month, 
Sept 15 through Oct. 15. 
This month includes In- 
dependence Days- of sev- 



eral Latin American 
countries, including 
Mexico on Sept. 16 and 
"Dia de la Raza" or 
Columbus Day on Oct 12. 
On Columbus Day we 
commemorate Columbus' 
first voyage to the New 



Saying good-bye, hello to children 



Saying good-bye to 
your child is difficult, 
even if you are confident 
that you have picked a 
fine caregiver. Remember 
that while babies adapt 
well to other caregivers, 
their primary emotional 
attachment is to their 
parents. You are the most 
important people in your 
child's life. The reaction 
at pick-up time shows 
that 

Prepare you child for 
the change in care as 
much as possible. Talk 
about it, the new people 
to meet, the new things to 
do and play with. Visit the 
center or day care home, 
or have a new caregiver 



meet the child at home. 
If possible, stay with 

your child for a while the 
first few days, or even all 
of the first day when be- 
ginning a new child care 
arrangement. Often a fa- 
vorite toy or blanket 
makes a new situation 
more comfortable for a 
child. A picture of the 
family or a personal item 
belonging to a parent can 
also make your child feel 
more secure. 

Be sure to say good- 
bye to your child when 
you leave — you don't 
want your child to feel 
deserted. Say that you will 
be back at pick-up time, 
and leave with a hug or 
kiss and a smile. 



Some children may 
react to separation by cry- 
ing or clinging to you. 
Others may forget their 
toilet training, wet their 
beds, suck their thumbs, 
or show resentment to 
you or other family mem- 
bers. Such problems are 
usually temporary. 
Warmth, patience and • 
understanding — not crit- 
icism — from parents and 
caregivers are normally 
enough to overcome such 
separation anxiety. 

Your own anxiety at 
leaving your child will be 
relieved as you develop a 
relationship with the 
caregiver and feel com- 
fortable that your child is 
being well cared for. 



World in 1492. 

With the exception of - 
Native Americans, His- 
panics have been here 
longer than anyone else. It 
was a crew of Spanish 
seamen and navigators 
who set out with Colum- 
bus to find and establish 
the first European settle- 
ment They came on a 
journey commissioned by 
the King and Queen of 
Spain in 1492. The 
southern part of the 
United States was ex- 
plored by De Soto and 
Coronado expeditions 
from 1539 to 1542, before 
the English settled in 
Jamestown in 1607 and 
Plymouth Rock in 1620. 

Spanish "conquista- 
dors" discovered most of 
the land lying west of 
Florida to the Mississippi 
River and from Kansas to 
California — and it was ■ 
Coronado and his cap- 
tains who first mapped 
the region west of the Mis- 
sissippi River and estab - 
lished prolonged contacts 
between European and 



Indian communities in 
territories which would 
become part of the U.S. 
Spanish architects and 
craftsmen had already 
built cities such as Ha- 
vana, San Juan, Lima and 
Cartagena, as well as set- 
tlements in the continen- 
tal United States includ- 
ing St. Augustine. Many of 
our nation's oldest 
churches were founded by 
Hispanic pioneers. 

Lucas Vasquez de Ay- 
ollon was a Spanish ex- 
plorer and first European 
colonizer of what is now 
South Carolina in 1526. 
Juan Ponce de Leon be- 
gan his career of explo- 
ration in 1493 as part of 
Christopher Columbus' 
second expedition to the 
New World. In 1508 and 
1509 he explored and set- 



University. 

It was Spanish engi- 
neers and botanists who 
cataloged the New 
World's flora and fauna, 
mapped its terrain and 
charted the rivers from the 
"Rio de la Plata" in the 
hemisphere's southern 
cone to the South Platte in 
our Great Plains. They de- 
veloped plans for mis- 
sions and towns. 

Hispanics make up a 
higher number of Con- 
gressional Medal of 
Honor winners than any 
ethnic group. There are 39 
of them. Men such as Pvt. 
Silvestre Herrera of Ari- 
zona who fought against 
German forces in France, 
and Lt. Col', Jose Hoiguin 
of California, outstanding 
navigator among U.S. 
bomber forces in the Pa- 



lled Puerto Rico, founding cific, are fine examples of 



the colony's oldest set 
tlement, Caparra. Ponce 
de Leon discovered 
Florida in the spring of 
1513. The first university 
to be founded in the 
Western Hemisphere 
opened in 1553 — Mexico 



Hispanic heroes. A num- 
ber of Hispanic American 
servicemen are also 
among those who have 
earned the Distinguished 
Service Cross as well as 
the Silver Star and Bronze 
Star. 









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Friday, October 1, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 5 



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Suspicious death upsets co-workers, residents 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

When Syms men's store opened for 
business at Gurnee Mills, Penny 
Williams was one of the first of 35 em- 
ployees. Now, she is being remembered 
for her bright personality and positive 
outlook by store workers. 

Williams, 27, was found dead in a 
marshy area near Midlane Country Club 
on Sunday. No charges were filed as of 
Tuesday as Gurnee police worked with the 
Lake County Major Crimes Task Force. 

"She was very well-liked,". Cindy 
O'Brien said of Williams. 

Williams was working her way to be- 
coming a supervisor of cash-register 
workers, O'Brien said. 

"I'm not sure what we will do, but we 
will try and do something," O'Brien said 
when asked if the store would help 
Williams's relatives. O'Brien said she has 
received many calls regarding funeral ar- 
rangements. 

Williams was living with her ex-hus- 
band, Herman, when she was reported 
missing Friday. 



Gurnee Police Chief John Ward activated 
the county-wide Major Crimes Task Force 
at 10:30 p,m. that night. Using a military 
helicopter, a Gurnee policeman and a 
member of the task force sighted Mrs. 
Williams' body near Midlane Country 
Club. 

"The investigation started at 9 p.m. Fri- 
day. We felt there was a high probability 
of foul play," Ward said. "We worked it 
constantly through the weekend and in- 
formation led us to believe we would find 
the body near Midlane," Ward said. 

Ward said police are going through the 
slow process of checking physical 
evidence. 

Lake County Coroner Barbara Richard- 
son said the cause of death was trauma to 
the head and abdomen. 

Mrs. Williams's two daughters were 
removed and placed in charge of DepL of 
Children and Family Services (DCFS). 
The family are new residents to Gurnee, 
moving from Phoenix. They resided in an 
apartment building on Depot Road in 
Gumcc. 



Area volunteers clean up Illinois 
State Beach as part of program 



by CLAUDIA M. LENART 

Lakeland Newspapers 

At a cleanup of Illinois State Beach in 
Zion, volunteers removed 8,346 cigarette 
butts from the lakefront. Also removed 
were 436 straws, 101 balloons, hundreds 
of food wrappers, containers and various 
other refuse for a total of 43 bags of 
garbage. 

But, said Marty Gregory, beach cleanup 
captain, "Illinois Beach is considered one 

'Illinois State beach is one 
of the cleanest beaches. 
And it was cleaner this year 
than it was last year.' 

— Marty Gregory 

of the cleanest beaches. And it was cleaner 
this year than it was last year." 

Illinois Beach was just one of hundreds 
of beaches around the world to get cleaned 
up as part of the 1993 International 
Coastal Cleanup sponsored by the Center 
for Marine Conservation. 



Locally, the Telephone Pioneers of 
America, Suburban Chapter 70 led the 
beach sweep with the help of 
environmentally concerned volunteers 
from across the county. The Telephone 
Pioneers of America consists of retirees 
and employees of telecommunications 
companies. It is the largest industrial 
community service organization in the 
world. 

Forty-eight volunteers spent three and a 
half hours, Sept. 15, combing 6.4 miles 
of Illinois State Beach for garbage. Data 
collected from the sweep will go to 
National Marine Database in Washington 
D.C. 

"Plastics are potentially the most 
harmful garbage. They take hundreds of 
years to break down," said Gregory. 
"Plastics can cause internal injury, 
blockage and starvation to aquatic 
animals." 

Also picked up from the beach were 10 
pounds of zebra mussels. Gregory said 
that was only a fraction of the washed-up 
zebra mussels littering the shores. 







Heritage 

4641 Grand Avenue 
Gurnee, IL 60031 



Office: 336-2600 

Fax: 249-6505 
Home: 356-6968 





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a 



Rick Broquet 



Thinking of Selling Your House? 

• Wlmt is the market value? 

• How long will it take? 

• Is tlie house prepared to sell? 

• What are the costs? 



TjMrinftafJfeiymg a Home? 

• Qualified for a mortgage? 

• What type of home? 

• What neighborhood? 

• What are the costs? 



CALL ME - If you arc asking these questions and want an answer. 

HELPING YOU REACH YOUR REAL 
ESTATE GOAL IS MY #1 OBJECTIVE 



Driving down Depot Road, one could 
imagine a simpler time. 

"When we moved in here, it was a big 
deal when a car went by on Grand 1 Av- 
enue," Ruth Ann Bratzke said. "When we 
moved here, there were seven homes and 
no paved streets." 

The actual depot itself has long since 
been abandoned, but the street was where 



Nelson Lumber Company, and later 
Gurnee Lumber once stood. There was 
also a blacktop company nearby at one 
time. 

"It is very scary ," Bratzke, a 42-year res- 
ident of Depot Road, said. Previous to the 
Friday incident, the most serious dilemma 
for the long-time Gurnee resident was 
when her mailbox was damaged. 



Woman found strangled 
in military housing area 



by MARK HAHN 
Lakeland Newspapers 

A Waukegan woman, apparently 
strangled to death, was found dead in a 
military housing area of Great Lakes 
Naval Training Center. 

The nude body of Iris Louise Stevens, 
32, of Waukegan, was discovered at 
about 2 p.m. Sept. 26 by a resident of the 
Forrestal Village housing complex located 
near Green Bay and Buckley Roads in 
North Chicago. 

The area is an open access housing area 
occupied by military personnel assigned 
to Great Lakes Naval Training Center and 
other local military installations. 

Barbara Richardson of the Lake County 
Coroner's Office, has confirmed that the 
cause of death was listed as strangulation, 
which occurred between 2-7 a.m. Sept. 
26. 

"There were no visible signs of a 
struggle or of any physical violence at the 
scene," said Lieutenant Commander Ken 
Cronk, special assistant for public affairs 



at Naval Training Center, Great Lakes. 

Authorities first thought that the 
woman was apparently beaten about the 
face and head during a struggle before her 
death, but it is now believed that those 
injuries may have been a result of a fight 
she had some days before with another 
individual. 

The investigation is presently being 
conducted by the Naval Criminal 
Investigative Service, assisted by North 
Chicago Police and the FBI (Federal 
Bureau of Investigation.) 

"The FBI is investigating the case 
because the body was discovered on a 
federal installation, and this is a capital 
crime," said Bill Dcrmody, assistant 
public affairs officer. Dcrmody said the 
FBI is also involved because, "...the 
victim was definitely a civilian, and the 
killer may have also been a civilian." 

Dcrmody said that the Naval Criminal 
Investigative Service is following a 
number of leads, and as of yet, no 
suspects have been taken into custody. 



Four enter guilty plead 



by SPENCER SCHEIN 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Four of the 15 defendants in a 
statewide grand jury drug-ring investiga- 
tion pled guilty to straight and reduced 
drug charges, with two of them receiving 
prison sentences ranging from six to 14 
years. 

Marco Rodriguez, 30, of 
Carpentcrsville, was sentenced to six 
years in the Illinois Department of 
Corrections after pleading guilty to a ne- 
gotiated charge of criminal drug conspir- 
acy on Sept. 27, a Lake County Circuit 
Court Clerk spokeswoman said. 
Rodriguez's term will run concurrently 
with a prison term he has in Kane 
County. 



■ 



Marco's brother, George Rodriguez, 
23, of Carpentcrsville, pled guilty to a 
charge of narcotics racketeering on Sept. 
27 and will be sentenced on Nov. 4, the 
spokeswoman said. 

Bernard Clifton, 32, of Palatine, and 
Jorge Rodriguez, 34, of Elgin, both pled 
guilty after plea-bargaining for lesser 
charges, a Lake County State's Attorney 
official said. 

Clifton pleaded guilty to unlawful de- 
livery of a controlled substance on Sept. 
21. He had requested not to be sentenced 
to the department of corrections as part of 
the bargain, and will be sentenced on 
Nov. 3, where he could receive probation 
or up to 14 years in jail, said Sean Burke, 
Lake County assistant stale's attorney. 




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CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY, INC. 



Providing quality restoration and renovation 
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16Lake!and Newspapers 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



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linbeataWe Prices - 
ulnbeatable Service 



Custom order any nev/r 
Ford car or truck 



- Color - Equipment 

We will find it within 

ONE working day! 




ONE PHONE CALL CAN 
SAVE YOU DAYS OF SHOPPING! 



'93 AEROSTAR XL 



7 Ftassongor Seating, Air Conditioning, Rear Defroster, Cruise 
Control, AM/FM Stereo Cassette, Automatic Transmission, 
Luggage Rack, Till. stk#K67lO 




$ 

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Was $17,535 



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'90 ESCORT . . ; 
'88 ESCORT . . , 
'88SUNBIRD... 
'88 CROWN VIC 
'90SUNBIRD .. 
'89 TEMPO ..., 
'91 HYUNDAI .., 
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..'4995 "90 TEMPO 

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Illuminated Enlry System, Roar Dofrotter, Cruise Control, AM/ W£& 
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Any customer of Reed Randle Ford wlli receive from $1 00 to $500 for 
eveiy new customer they refer! Call us for detallsl 



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'Offers end as follows: Aerostar: 12/9/93, Crown^ic: 1/10/94, 
Bronco: 10/13/93. 48 Month Tern for qualified buyers. See 

dealer for details. 







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Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 17 



■ ■ ■ -■ .' ' s i ■ - ■ ■ 



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* 1 i I » . « * « 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 




Round Lake Beach youth 
pleads guilty to sex crimes 

Four to 1 2 years 
sought by State 



Above. Richard Hill, presi- 
dent of Round Lake Area 
Chamber of Commerce and 
Mayor Ralph Davis of Round 
Lake Beach speak to 
Commonwealth Edison 
President Samuel Skinner 
at a breakfast meeting at 
Dockers in Fox Lake. Left, 
Ken Hamsher, mayor of Fox 
Lake and Fox Lake Clerk 
Sue McNatly discuss cur- 
rent issues with Hawthorn 
Woods Village President 
Douglas F. Challos. — 
Photos by Bill Carey 



by ALEC JUNGE 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Christopher Hanson, 17, Round Lake 
Beach entered into a plea agreement for 
raping a Libertyville woman and for 
criminal sexual assault of a Round Lake 
woman. 

The plea agreement calls a sentence of 
not less than four years and up to but not 
more than 12 years. The sentencing 
hearing is on OcL 22. 

"We are Tiappy with the agreement, 
said prosecutor George Strickland. "It 
saves the victim from going through a 
trial and assures a conviction. The victims 
. and their families are pleased that he will 
go to prison." 

Hanson was detained by Round Lake 
Police on Aug. 22 after a citizen reported 
a woman was being tossed to the ground 



by a male. The officers and several 
departments got involved in a chase before 
they found Hanson hiding by a van. 

Liberty ville Police were closing in on 
Hanson and were going to question him 
on Monday. They received a call from the 
Round Lake Police who had caught him 
on Sunday. Police tied the two crimes 
together by victims* identification and 
from calls which matched Hanson's 
description. 

On Aug. 16, the 27-year-old 
Liberty ville woman was walking on the 
North Shore bike path when Hanson 
grabbed her from behind and forced her off 
the path, sexually assaulted her, and fled 
the area on fooL 

There are some remaining assaults in 
the Libertyville area and Police Chief Dan 
McCormick recommends that women be 
as alert as possible for threatening 
situations and walk or ride bicycles with 
another person or a dog. 



Rate settlement nets savings Savaw will enter nlea in 

Lake County residents will see a 25 utility's Chairman and Chief Executive ^** ▼ ^J^ TYJJJ. VJJ.lA/1 JJJ.VCI M.R*. 

triple homicide of infants 



Lake County residents will see a 25 
percent reduction in their electricity rates 
as a result of a $1.34 billion refund and a 
$339 million annual rate reduction an- 
nounced by Commonwealth Edison and 
about a dozen consumer groups and gov- 
ernmental agencies. 

The landmark settlement was reached 
after the company, consumer representa- 
tives and government agencies agreed to 
settle six rate cases pending before the 
Illinois courts and the Illinois Commerce 
Commission. 

Participants in the settlement include 
Business and Professional People for the 
Public Interest (BPI), the Illinois Indus- 
trial Energy Consumers (IIEC),' the Citi- 
zens Utility Board (CUB), the City of 
Chicago, the Illinois Attorney General, 
the Cook County States Attorney, the 
South Austin Coalition Community 
Council and the Labor Coalition on Pub- 
lic Utilities. 

The average residential single family 
customer will see approximately $272 in 
savings over the 12 months. The average 
small commercial or industrial customer 
will see savings totaling about $1,700.- 

The settlement is believed to be the 
largest of its kind involving an electric 
utility in the United States. 

"Commonwealth Edison believes this 
proposal is in the best interest of all con- 
cerned," declared James J. O'Connor, the 



utility's Chairman and Chief Executive 
Officer. "For too long, these controversies 
have required too much of our company's 
resources." 

"This is a fair settlement and the con- 
sumers are winners," said Howard A. 
Learner," BPI's General Counsel who led 
the negotiations for consumers. "To para- 



by SPENCER SCHEIN 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Wauconda resident Gail Lynn Savage 
was scheduled to appear in court Thursday 



phrase Mark Twain, "We have done the wn ere she was to enter a plea after being 

right thing because the $1.34 billion re- indicted by a Lake County grand jury on 

fund and the $339 million rate reduction 

will certainly please consumers, and the 

settlement should astonish any skeptics." 

primary responsibility — providing the best 

service possible to our customers, and 

stimulating the vitality of our service area, 

resulting in more jobs." 

Learner concurred with O'Connor that 
the settlement bodes well for the region's 
economy, adding, "The refund will boost 
the Northern Illinois economy by holding 
down electricity rates. Consumers have 
achieved a fair conclusion in the long and 



three counts of first degree murder in the 
deaths of her three infants over a three 
year period 

Savage, 30, had allegedly confessed to 
the murders to Lake County Sheriffs offi- 
cials after being questioned for a number 
of hours after her husband, James, 36, 
was subpoenaed to appear before a grand 
jury on Sept. 8. 

She allegedly told authorities she used 
a blanket to suffocate the infants to make 
them stop crying. 

While Lake County has been a slop 



winding road to litigation over Edison's for several murderers on county- and state- 
nuclear plants in the last decade." wide killing sprees, Lake County 
O'Connor, while relieved that his com- Assistant State's Attorney Matthew 
pany can put the rate cases behind it, made Chancey said it was the first time in the 
it clear he believed the utility had acted in 14-plus years he has been with the de- 
good faith in pursuing the rate increases, partment that anyone had been charged 



"Edison strongly believed at all times that 
it was acting in accordance with Illinois 
Commerce Commission direcdon and in 
the interests of its customers and share- 
holders." 



with committing three murders in Lake 
County. 



"This is the only one that I know of," 
Chancey said. 

The grand jury met Sept. 22 and 
charged Savage with first degree murder 
for the death of Michael Andrew, who died 
on Nov. 5, 1990, Amber Lynn, who died 
on Feb. 5,' 1992 and Cynthia Gail, who 
died July 26. None of the babies lived 
longer than five-months. 

Savage has remained in custody at 
Lake County Jail with no bond set, 
Chancey said. She was scheduled to ap- 
pear in court on Sept. 30 before Judge 
Charles Scott for an arraignment on the 
murder indictments. 

If convicted on one count, Savage 
would face between 20 to 60 years in the 
Illinois Department of Corrections, 
Chancey said. If convicted on two or 
more counts of first degree murder, 
Chancey said Savage would face manda- 
tory life imprisonment. A decision to 
seek the death penalty would have to 
come from Lake County State's Attorney 
Michael J. Waller. 




Over 300 expected 
to walk for hungry 



by SUZIE REED 

Lakeland Newspapers 

The Fourth Annual 
Cropwalk will step off from 
the Libertyville Evangelical 
Free Church at Austin and 
Garfield in Libertyville at 2 
p.m. Sunday, Oct, 3. Over 
300 participants are ex- 
pected this year. 

Supported by many area 
churches, the event is spon- 
sored by Church World Ser- 
vice, a refugee relief and 
disaster response agency. 
They were instrumental in 
providing emergency sup- 
plies to victims of 
Hurricane Andrew and are 
currently involved in the re- 
lief effort in Somalia. Local 
agencies who benefit from 
the drive arc P.A.D.S., A 
Safe Place and the Lake 
County food Resources 
Council. 

"We're hoping for 350 



this time," said publicity 
chairperson Karen Hehn. 
"We had 250 last year. 
We're raising our goal. All 
the individuals did quite 
well last year in getting 
pledges." 

Walkers solicit pledges 
for each kilometer walked 
and may opt for cither a 5K 
or 10K walk. The route 
loops around north to Butler 
Lake, then back to the 
church for the short version. 
The 10K continues to Golf 
across Milwaukee to' 
Country Club Lane and 
back to Rockland, then over 
to the church. 

Anyone wishing to sup- 
port the Cropwalk may 
simply send in a donation 
to: CROP Treasurer, United 
Methodist Church of 
Libertyville, 429 Brainerd 
Ave., Libertyville, IL 
69948; 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BID 

The Round Lake Area Park District is accepting bids 
for the Printing and Typesetting of the four (4) quarterly 
publication for their Winter through Fall 1994 Brochures. 

Completed bid documents should be submitted to the 
Park District, 814 Hart Road, Round Lake, IL 60073, no 
later than 12:00 noon on Monday, October 11th, 1993. 

The Board of Commissioners reserve the right to 
defer acceptance of any proposal for a period not to 
exceed 30 calendar days after the date of bids are 
received and to reject any or all proposals and to waive 
technicalities. 

Bid documents may be obtained at the Round Lake 
Area Park District, 814 Hart Road, Round Lake, IL 60073 
Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

0993E-1 13-Gen 
October 1, 1993 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Public notice is hereby given that the Woodland 
Community Consolidated School District No. 50, Lake 
County, Gages Lake, Illinois, will receive bids for 
Property, Casualty, and Worker's Compensation 
Insurance Coverages. Bid specifications may be 
obtained upon request from INSURANCE MANAGE- 
MENT BUREAU, 5754 West 74th Street, Indianapolis, 
Indiana 46278-1754. Phone (317) 290-4250. All bids 
are to be received by Insurance Management Bureau at 
5754 West 74th Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46278 on 
or before 2:00 P.M.. Monday, November 1, 1993, and 
will be opened at that time. The Board of Education will 
make its decision at a later date and reserves the right to 
waive all technicalities or irregularities and to reject any 
or ail bids or any part or parts thereof. 

0993E-114-Gen 
October 1, 1993 



PUBUC NOTICE 
RESOLUTION 

Whereas, the City of North Chicago desires to sell the 
following surplus real estate. 

a) PARCEL 1: Lot 45 & 46 in Block 131 in South 
Waukegan, being a subdivision of the Southwest 1/4 of 
the Northwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 44 North, 
Range 12 East of the Third Principal Meridian, and part 
of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 5, 
Township 44 North, Range 12, East of the Third 
Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded 
March 17, 1893 as Document 53390 In Book "C" of 
Plats, pages 56 and 57, in Lake County, Illinois, 

PARCEL 2: The East 1/2 of of the vacated alley 
lying West of and adjoining Lots 45 & 46 and South 1/2 
of vacated alley lying North of & adjoining Lot 46 in Block 
131 in South Waukegan, aforesaid, vacated by ordi- 
nance passed and approved February 17, 1964 and 
recorded May 27, 1964 as Document 1226796, in Lake 
County, Illinois. 

b) That said lots are equally 58' x 130.93 feet each 
in size. 

c) That the lots are vacated and zoned residential. 

d) That the lots have been appraised for $9,300.00 
by a state certified agency. 

Whereas, the City of North Chicago desires to sell 
said real estate for 80% of the appraised price to Habitat 
for Humanity. 

BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE MAYOR AND CITY 
COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF NORTH CHICAGO, ILLI- 
NOIS, that the staff of the City of North Chicago be 
authorized to sell the above surplus real estate for a sum 
not less than 80% of the appraised price, and that the 
Mayor and City Clerk be directed to execute all docu- 
ments necessary for said sale. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that this Resolution be pub- 
lished once by the City Clerk in the Waukegan News Sun. 
ATTEST: Bobby E. Thompson 

Catherine L Collins MAYOR 

CITY CLERK O993E-104-Gen 

Passed: September 20, 1 993 October 1 , 1 993 



18 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 



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iS-^as of Sept. 28 

Company Price Change Divi 
26 7/8 +3/4 S0.68 



Abbott 

AT&T3SSSS 

Ameritecb 

.;; Baxter ..'. 
Brunswick 
ComnvEd. 

" Kemper 
McDonalds 
Motorola 



.59 1/2: +'3/4. w$ram 

87 3/8 -1/2 
';• ^21 .5/8" +1-1/8: 

14 1/8 -1/4 
30 1/2 -1/2 

41 3/8 +1 7/8 

53 1/2 +11/2, 



$3.68 
:$1.00 
S0.44 
'$i;6^):: 
S0.92 
S0\43 v 
1041/2 +12 1/4 50.44 
Peoples Energy 32 3/8 +3/8? 51:78 



Quakers Oats 
Sara Lee 
_JJcars ^ 
UniteiriAir 
Walgreens 
Waste Mgt 
Cherry Elec. 



67 1/8 

23 1/2 +1/8 
55 7/8 +3/8 



$2.12 
$0.58 
$1.60 



144 5/8 +6 l/8:$0;00' 
37 3/4 +7/8 $0.60 
31 5/8 +1 1/2 $0.60. 
17 1/8 +3 1/8 $0.00 



Business Briefs 



Rallo named to 
f Who f sWho f 

LAKE . /FOREST— Personal 
injury attorney Douglas Rallo was 
selected for "Who's Who in American 
Law" for the'second consecutive year. 
Selection for the^publication is based 
on significant achievement in'. the legal 
profession. 

Abbott declares 
quarterly dividend 

ABBOTX PAlUt-VThe Board of 
Directors . of^ Abbott laboratories 
approved the purchase of up to 20 
million shares of its common stock 
from time to time in me open, market 
and , declared a quarterly ,. common 
fj dividend of $. 17 a share. The dividend 
: l .will be payable ;ori Nov. 15.' to 



shareholders of record at the close of 
business on Oct ,15. This marks the 
:279th;Consecutive dividend to be paid 
by Abbott since 1924. 

Lakeland Bank 
earns 5-star rating 

Round Lake Heights- 
Lakeland Community Bank has been 
awarded a five-star rating by Bauer 
Financial Reports, Inc., a bank 
research firm; Tliis award recognizes 
Lakeland for superior safety, strength 
and performance. 

Anchor Bank set 
for bank opening 

GRAYSLAKE— Anchor Bank, 
located in Grayslake, awaitsthe final 



completion of their new bank', 
building,; located on Route 4:5; just' 
north of Wkshington Street, "which ; 
ground, was broken for on July 13, ;■ 
The attractive ; ; - French ^colonial 
exteribred, building I will serve the 
communities of Wildwood, Grayslake, 
Third Lake and Gages Lake. 

Raffaelli's open for 
up to 250 people 

LIBERTYVILLE— Raffaelli's 
Italian Cafe and Banquets, formally 
Buckley's Restaurant, is now open for 
business in Libertyville. Raffaelli's 
owner Frank Raffaelli; along with his 
partner Mary Freemon, was a general 
partner of Buckley's for three years. 
The new restaurant has been 
completely remodeled and specializes 
in traditional Italian food, spiced with 
old world charm. Raffaelli's is located 
on Milwaukee Avenue in Libertyville 




Family-owned print firm may meet variety of needs 



Attending a baseball game in Aurora or a 
church service in Round Lake may bring 
something in common. 

For when one opens up the program of 
the Kane County Cougars or a church 
brochure, one sees the dedication to 
quality of Perfect Impressions Printing. 

Michael Ruggiero, vice president and co- 
owner of the firm, brings a long-time 
background into the printing business. 

"I started when my father John was a 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 



foreman at a print shop. The equipment 
was nothing like we have today," 
Ruggiero said. 

The printing business is a family one for 
the Ruggieros. Mike's cousin operates a 
bindery in Chicago. 

The Round Lake Beach firm now has 
web presses worth $120,000 if replaced 
with a new one today. 

"We have had jobs from Apple Valley, 
Minn, to Florida and California and local 
jobs as well;" Ruggiero said. 

The firm has donated space so St. Joseph 
could advertise its Las Vegas night, and 
local customers include Round Lake 
Public Library. Perfect Impressions has 
also worked with other local printing 
operations. 

The business, like Ruggiero's humble 
beginnings as a floor boy making sure 
presses are supplied, had a humble begin- 
ning. "We started out in .the garage," he 
recalled. 

"Direct mail and commercial jobs carry 
us," he said. 

Services include: multi-colored printing, 

four-color process on offset and coated pa- 



per, letterheads, envelopes, business cards, 
labels, newsletters, flyers, brochures, die 
cut folders, NCR carbonless forms, in- 
voices, order forms, books and booklets, 
catalogs, proposals, note pads, perforat- 
ing, scoring, numbering, typesetting and 
design for all printing needs. 



Equipment used at the Round Lake 
Beach plant, includes a Didde four-color 
web press with hole punch and cross, skip 
and in-line perfing and two offset presses 
and five prepresses. 

Customers may give input on the form 
of a report card in which customers may 



rate: quality of product, attitude of staff, 
overall quality of service, overall level of 
performance. Customers receive $10 just 
for filing out the form. 

Mike and Nancy Ruggiero operate the 
five-employee printing plant. 

For more information, call 546-3242. . 




Abbott Labs files 
shelf regulation 
with the SEC 

Abbott Laboratories reported that it 
has filed a shelf registration statement 
with the Securities and Exchange 
Commission covering $500 million 
of unsecured debt securities, which 
may be offered from time to time with 
prices and term to be determined at the 
time of the offering. 

The filing includes an initial 
offering of up $500 million of 
Medium Term Notes with terms of 
nine months to 30 years. Abbott 
officials said the statement has not yet 
become effective. 



Michael Ruggiero, vice-president and co-owner of Perfect 
Impressions, discusses a print order ready to go to press 
with Nancy Ruggiero and Marcey Sagen. The printing firm is 



located on Circuit Drive in Round Lake Beach. — Photo by 
Steve Peterson 



Celebrate Pickard China's 100th 



by CLAUDIA M. LENART 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Celebrate Pickard China's 100th 
anniversary this Saturday, Oct. 2. The 
village and the renowned Antioch 
company are coming together to celebrate 
the anniversary with tours of the plant and 
renaming of Corona Avenue to Pickard 
Avenue, 

Tours will run from 9 a.m. to 11:30 
a.m. They will last for about 25 minutes 
and include forming, firing and decorating 
of the china. Children 12 or younger must 
be accompanied by an adult. Those 
waiting for the tours will be treated to 
refreshments served by the village. 



Pickard will also show a video on the 
business. 

The street dedication will be held at 
12:15 p.m. and will include Mayor 
Marilyn Shineflug and village trustees. 

Pickard China has won numerous 
awards for its china over the years. The 
fine pieces made in Antioch can be found 
on Air Force 1, at Camp David and at 
every U.S. Embassy across the world. 

The company was founded in Edgcrton, 
Wise, by Wilder Austin Pickard and later 
moved to Chicago. In 1937, Pickard 
moved to Antioch to begin manufacturing 
china. 

Pickard China is located at 782 Corona 
Avenue, soon to be 782 Pickard Avenue. 




Friday, October 1,1993 



"^ ~ 



A Pickard China artist decorates a 
china plate with the U.S. seal. 

Lakeland Newspapers 19 



1 



■ 









® 






1 T 1 1 * 



Lakeland Newspapers' BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



- 



.. 




bank's most senior 



i 



employee bids farewell 



Diane Reitz closed 32 years of finan- 
cial services to Antioch and Southern 
Wisconsin residents as she bids farewell 
to her fellow employees at First Chicago 
Bank where she is Supervisor of Cus- 
tomer Service. She and her husband Pete 
Reitz, long-time Service Director at Don 
Pittman Motors are both retiring to their 
new home in Sarasota, Fla. 

"Actually, I expect we'll only semi-re- 
tire," Diane says. "We're both still too ac- 
tive to just sit and do nothing." 

Reitz has seen an active and exciting 
career in financial services. She reports. 
"If people think bankers have no excite- 
ment—Well, let me tell you! It gets 



pretty exciting when the government offi- 
cials show up at closing time, lock the 
doors and announce that you're insolvent! 
Nobody leaves the premises until we have 
inventoried everything." 

Diane, and Peter have lived for 27 
years at Lake Shangri-La, Bristol, Wis., 
but have already sold their home there, 
and have begun painting and fixing their 
retirement home. "We're going to really 
miss our many friends and colleagues in 
the Antioch area," she said. "And of 
course, we'll also miss the bitter cold, 
shoveling snow, driving through sleet and 
slush, and so on, too! she added with a 
smile. 




Ribbon cutting 



Numerous local officials were on hand for the ribbon cutting for River Bend, a 
new luxury subdivision in Libertyville Township. Cutting the ribbon from left 
to right were County Board District 11 member Dick Raftis, Board Chair 
Robert Depke, Country Estates Developers Tim O'Leary, Waukegan city 
councilman John Rickard and Waukegan Mayor Bill Durkin. , 



Business Personnel 




Medical Center, Chicago, and 
Hines Veterans Hospital, May- 
wood. 



Mari Ann Deering 

Sanofi Animal Health, Inc. an- 
nounces the promotion of Man- 
Ann Deering to vice president of 
Human Resources. Her job re- 
sponsibilities include all human re- 
source functions for North 
America including recruitment, 
compensation, benefits, equal 
employment opportunity and 
safety. Deering received her 
bachelor of science degree in 
business administration from Avila 
College, Kansas City, Mo., and is 
currently working toward her 
MBA at Rockhurst College, 
Kansas City. She is a certified 
SPHR (Senior Professional in Hu- 
man Resources) and is a member 
of the Society for Human Re- 
source Management as well as the 
Veterinary Industry Human Re- 
source Assn. She is a native of 
Grays lake and currently resides in 
Overland Park, Kansas. 



Rohit Shah 

Rohit R. Shah, M.D., has been 
appointed to the Victory Memorial 
Hospital Medical staff. Dr. Shah is 
board certified in Internal 
Medicine and Oncology. He 
completed his internship at Cook 
County Hospital, Chicago, and 
residencies at Mercy Hospital and 




Bill Hill 

Delivery driver Bill Hill of Fox 
Lake has retired from United Par- 
cel Service after 37 years of ser- 
vice with the parcel delivery firm, 
the company announced. Hill was 
honored at a retirement ceremony 
at UPS's Northbrook facility. Hill 
began his UPS career in 1956 as a 
delivery driver in Highland Park. 
He moved over to UPS's North- 
brook hub when it opened and he 
has been there since. Hill and his 
wife, Jeanette, have been married 
for 34 years. They have four chil- 
dren and three grandchildren. 

Russell Fitton 

Tri-State Realty represented 
Russell P. Fitton III, D.D.S., P.C. in 
the purchase of a Barrington of- 
fice building using financing ob- 
tained through the Small Business 
Administration's (SB A) 7(a) Loan 
Program. Dr. Fitton will use just 
over half of the 6,000 square foot 
building, located at 800 Northwest 
Hwy„ to expand his dental prac- 
tice. Tri-State Realty has been ap- 
pointed to lease the remaining 
2,900 square feet 



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20 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 



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Lakeland Newspapers 1 BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



& 



3- 






Investment Trends 







Noah A. Seidenberg 

Editor's note: This is a col- 
umn highlighting stocks of local 
interest. The author, Noah Sei- 
denberg, is the local representa- 
tive for Edward D. Jones and Co., 
the nation's largest investment 



firm. For further information or 
additonal questions, call 223- 
1908. 

Motorola (Mot) — As multi-media 
becomes the catch word for the 1990's, 
Schaumburg based Motorola is well 
positioned to take advantage of the 
technological advances. Their main 
divisions, communications, 
semiconductors and general systems, 
account for 87 percent of sales. 

Earnings continue to rise with 1992's 
EPS $2.16 (excluding an accounting 
change) and 1993's seen as $3.25 a share 
while 1994 is estimated at $3.90 a share. 
Margins look to get higher as the first 
half of 1993 EPS were up 55 percent on a 
22 percent rise in revenue. 

Motorola is .looking to branch out 
both internationally and domestically. Ar- 
gentina recently postponed Motorola's bid 
for one of two cellular licenses it's offer- 
ing. While domestically. Motorola is 
conducting trials with Cable Vision to 
create a cable based personal communica- 



tion network, In other domestic news, it 
acquired privately held Indala Corp. of San 
Jose for undisclosed terms. Indala manu- 
factures radio frequency identification cards 
and tags and readers used in proximity ac- 
cess control. 

Even with its advances, Motorola is 
given an avoid rating by Standard & 
Poor's, meaning that it is expected to be a 
below average performer. This could be 
based on several factors: Its low current 
assets to current liabilities ration, its 77 
percent institutional holdings rate, the 
P/E of 28.5 and finally, its 100 percent 
run-up in price for 1993 from 48 3/4 to 
99 1/8. 

McDonalds (MCD)— The restaurant 
that everybody thinks of when they think 
fast food, is also a great stock to own 
today .-The reason that MCD is attractive 
right now, its expected to post 13 to 15 
percent annual EPS growth based on the 
assumption that international growth will 
be 20 percent annually and domestic 
growth slight. Over the next few years, 



McDonalds starts to open : 700-900 new 
units per year. MCD is using its strong 
cash flow from its U.S. restaurants to 
finance its international growth. 
Expansion plans have been boosted due to 
improvements in distribution and 
infrastructure, making it possible for 
MCD to make a profit in a new country 
in about one year. In addition, less capital 
is now required to fund expansion with 
the cost of a new unit at $1.0 million 
versus $1.6 million. On a more technical 
basis MCD is selling at a P/E of 16.6 
versus 17.2 for the S&P 500, a discount 
to the market. 

In support of its strong future, Mc- 
Donalds also has a strong past with the 
value of an investment doubling within 
the last four years, for a compound annual 
rate of. return of approximately 18 percent 

Rated a buy or a strong buy by several 
major agencies, the nearly one percent 
dividend is like icing on the cake for a 
company with a strong past and a bright 
future. 



Motorola lauded for 
pollution prevention 



bySUZIEREED 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Motorola Inc. of Schaumburg and 
Libertyvillc was among 15 Illinois busi- 
nesses and organizations who received 
Pollution Prevention Awards from Gov. 
Jim Edgar. 

Applicants were judged on their inno- 
vative strategics and use of alternative 



technologies to reduce, recycle and reuse 
industrial wastes. The applications were 
reviewed by the Hazardous Waste Re- 
search and Information Center and the 
Illinois Environmental Protection 
Agency. 

Motorola was one of three companies 
honored in the category of large facilities. 






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It. You need a 
vehicle that gets 
the Job done too. 
Durable, 
Dependable. 
And a good 
value for the 
money. 

It's time you had 
a truck! 




4P& 



SANDY McKIE ci - plvmout dodge and i 



ISANDY 



■torn 



701-587-6473 



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Friday, October I , 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 21 



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GET "IT" OFF 

YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



LIPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 6) 

Sunken treasure 

I do not think any tax dollars should go to a pool in 
Grayslake when all that money is going to be needed to 
clean up all that dumping that went on. 

Small minds 

This is Charley Frayer, son of the ex-mayor of Lake Villa. 
I just want to thank all the small minds that make my 
mother's life so fun. 

Why there? 

Every night while driving home from work at midnight, I 
see Lindenhurst squad cars parked along Deep Lake Road. 
My question is, how many Lindenhurst residents reside on 
Deep Lake Road? I really like Lipservice, 

Good son 

My mother lives on Lake Street and Route 173, the 
Trinity Apartments, I go over on the weekends to visit her. 
There are a lot of elderly people there. What really blows 
my mind is the amount of squealing tires and drinking that 
goes on in the parking lot. She can't get sleep and cannot 
find other housing. Antioch is supposed to be a nice place 
to live. It appears to be the worst part of town. I am 
whining, gripping, etc... for my mom! 

Working together 

I just read that Fox Lake is going to donate a squad car to 
the newly incorporated town of Volo. I think that is a real 
nice gesture. It is nice to see a couple villages working 
together for a change. 

Cable conspiracy 

Why did U. S. Cable choose to rearrange some of the 
channels to use the 50's and 60's group? Is it because most 
televisions cannot be programmed this high and you would 
need to rent a control box in order to see these so called free 
channels? Why couldn't they place the pay channels in this 
group? 

Land sale 

I see Libertyville High School sold property to make 
money. Why doesn't Antioch Community High School? 

Give it up 

I have read that Bob Depke now says that we did not get 
the riverboat because the county does not have enough 
debt. Come on Bob, give it up. You didn't get it because 
you did not get it! 

Style not a crime 

I calling to respond to "Fashion statement." I am 
appalled that this person is a social worker and thinks that 
a dress code would be a cause for a child's abuse. A dress 
code has nothing to do with it. This person should go back 
to school. A fashion statement is exactly that, a fashion 
statement. It is a way children express themselves. 

Where was he? 

In regards to the botched prosecution of the El Rukins, 
where was the famous Freddy Foreman? He was the U. S. 
Attorney on watch. 

Who will pay? 

It looks like the Grayslake park district has talked the 
library into building a space five times larger than their 
current facilities in order to help vote in the community 
center. All those that want to pay big taxes on this, they 
can line up, for voting. Someone has to pay for it. Us 
working stiffs know it isn't for free. 



WHY BUY? 

Rent It From Us! 

Save precious storage space, 
money and help cut down 
on unecessary consumer 
Ism too, by renting the 
Items that you seldom 
use. 

•Party Needs 
•Guest Needs 




•Pluinbin 
Tools 



• Power 
Tools 
• Lawn & 
. Garden 
Needs 

• Contractor 
Equipment 
• Camping 
Equipment 

If we don't have it, 
we'll find it for youl 

Libertyville Rent-Alls 
362-761 



We suggest that we should give our dollars to our church or 
favorite charity instead of lining the pockets of 
politicians. 

Very good neighbors 

■ I think it is terrible that a handful of disgruntled people 
are trying to close Kristoffs. All the years we have lived 
here, the Kristoffs have contributed to the schools, boy 
scouts, and been part of all community events. They are 
good citizens and good neighbors. They deserve to be 
treated better than this. 

Very lucky couple 

How about a little sunshine for your Lipservice? Poppa 
and I are celebrating our 60th anniversary and doing well. 
Living in one of the old remodeled one room school 
houses, we have been in Mundelein for years. My 
daughters and son-in-law live only a mile away, with three 
beautiful granddaughters, and three wonderful great 
grandbabies. Thank you, God. 

Sports mother 

Hi, I am a mother of Fox Lake Cardinals. Why is there 
nothing in the Fox Lake Press about the winning 
Cardinals? Everyone else is there at the games except the 
sports editor. 1 don't understand this. Why haven't you 
come out and seen them? 

Editorial note: Dear reader, we are sorry but 
it is simply impossible for us to attend every 
single sporting event in Lake County, 
However, if the results of these games were to 
be sent in, they would be printed. Please send 
this information to the attention of the sports 
editor. 

Tough guys sleep soundly 

What kind of wimps do we have moving into Antioch. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



First, they were complaining about the necessary rescue 
squad sirens. Now, they are complaining about the 
necessary train whistles. What next? Are they going to 
want all the trees cut down because the sound of the wind 
whistling through them is disturbing? 

Speed limit is for everyone 

Everyone is complaining about the cars flying down the 
street in Round Lake. But, the police and village 
employees are as guilty as anyone else. The badge does not 
give you the right to speed I 

Not a parent 

I have something to say about these high school kids. 
You are only in school for 1/2 hour a day. We are going to 
vote on the referendum and the answer is going to be NO. 
The taxes arc already too damn high. Let these kids get a 
job. 

Love advice 

This is to my neighbor. You are dating a married man 
who also has a girlfriend in Lake Villa. Watch out! 

Happy wife 

I am married to the most wonderful man in the world. I 
appreciate him and his talent more than he can ever know. 

Dollars well spent 

What in the world has happened to the Illinois Iottcry7 

Cost an issue 

I agree with the editorial in this weeks Round Lake News 
about dropping the plans to build in the marsh area at 
Crossroads. I don't know if anyone has given any thought 
to the cost of developing a marsh area. I think the cost 
would be prohibitive. So, you are right on the ball about 
thatl 
(Continued on page 32) 



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October 2nd 

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s 20.00/per family 

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Lunch 
5:30-Twilight Show 
Plane Rides - $ 1 0.00 




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Sunday, 
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22 Lakeland Newspaper! 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



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. Illinois, Sherri Shuster Hicks is representative of a lot of married women 
[America today. 

Like thera, she only gets 24 hours a day in which to juggle the roles of wife, 
"mother, homemaker, charity volunteer and career woman, 
"I work and have a strong commitment to my family. I understand the stresses. I 
say that wholeheartedly. It's tough," the 1993 Mrs. America hopeful said. 

But the 32 year old Long Grove resident's life is hardly typical of late. 
Representing Illinois, Hicks will vie with 50 other contestants for the Mrs. America 
title in San Diego on Oct 14. 

Since being crowned Mrs. Illinois in March at Hemmens Theatre in Elgin, Hicks 

has put her professional modeling 
career on hold to make time for the 
round of public engagements expected 
of a beauty queen. Telethons for 
Muscular Dystrophy, Cerebral Palsy and 
Easter Seals; luncheons, political events, 
and spokesperson assignments have 
filled her days the past six months. 

The crown is heavy, she said, heavy 
with responsibility. But Hicks appears 
unrattled. Pageant organizers obviously 
know what they're doing when they 
place such a premium on poise. 

Hicks, however, credits her claim to 
the supportive team that surrounds her. 
husband Bob, daughters Lauren, 4, and 
Brittany, 2, and her fabulous sponsor, 
the Forest Grove Athletic Club in 
Palatine. 

And Hicks is pleased that her reign has 
been In large part a family affair. Her 
husband and children have been 
allowed to accompany her and partici- 
pate in many of her public appearances, 
and that has made the experience "lots 
of fun," she said. 

But the highlight of being Mrs. Illinois, 
she said, was a meeting with U.S. 
Representative, Phil Crane. "Crane came 
to my doorstep, and stayed for three 
hours with me. That said so much about 
this man," she said. 

Hicks takes a brief hiatus from the 
whirl of local activities as she leaves for 





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San Diego on Oct. 7 for a week's worth of national pageant 
preliminaries including rehearsals, competitions and 
press meetings. 

On the day of the pageant, which will be hosted by 
Florence Henderson and taped for national television 
broadcast, Hicks, 5' 7" blue-eyed blond weighing 128 lbs., 
will face a panel of seven celebrity judges who will scruti- 
nize her beauty, poise and personality in personal inter- 
view, evening gown and swimsuit categories, said Marcie 
Aceto, executive director of the Mrs. Illinois Pageant 



by SUSAN KLEIN 



The judges will be looking for a "very well-rounded 
individual," she said. Whether the new Mrs. America is a 
homemaker, a career woman, or a grandmother, she has 
to have charisma, she said. "That's noticed by the judges." 

Aceto outlined the qualifications for a Mrs. America 
Pageant contestant Besides having won her state pageant, 
she must be married and currently living with her spouse. 
She also must be a United States citizen and a resident of 
the state she represents for at least six months prior to the 

7 work and have a strong commitment 
to my family, I understand the stresses. I 
say that wholeheartediy. It's tough.' 

— Sherri Shuster Hicks, Mrs. Illinois 

state pageant, and at least 18 years of age. There is no 
maximum age limit and no size requirement 

The winner of the pageant is awarded a series of prizes 
which may include a car and a fur coat and goes on to 
compete in the Mrs. World Pageant held in Australia, she 
said. 

Hicks, a former Miss Teen Ohio, is relaxed as she pre- 
pares to leave for San Diego. Her one concern now is that 
she will miss her daughter's third birthday. "That bothers 
me," she said. She's picked up her gown in Atlanta, alJ 
pearls, rhinestones and white chiffon designed by Robin 
Elliott of Morton Grove, and she is exercising, eating right 
and honing up on current events for the interview portion 
of the competition. 

Hicks brings her poise and beauty with her naturally. 
She's been a professional model since her teens. Fresh out 
of high school, she had a stint with the highly selective 
Ford Model Agency in New York. Eileen and Jerry Ford 
took her into their Manhattan home. But after eight 
months of prestigious assignments, the midwestern girl 
from Cincinnati was "overwhelmed" by the Big Apple and 
returned to the midwest to settle in Chicago. 

Her work resume is long and includes gigs with super- 
model Cheryl Ticgs as a junior apparel model for Sears, 
and print and television ads for Head and Shoulders 
Shampoo. 

Despite her ostensibly glamorous lifestyle, Hicks is 
friendly, self-effacing, and incredibly down-to-earth, and 
she appears to be totally focused. 

And concerning the pageants, she is serious-minded. 
The material rewards don't interest the successful model. 
What attracted her to the Mrs. Illinois Pageant was its 
emphasis on charitable service. She's a dedicated 
fundraiser for the Make-a-Wish Foundation. "I wanted to 
draw attention to that wonderful foundation," she said. 

Hicks entered the Mrs. Illinois Pageant at the urging of 
friends who are affiliated with the Miss Universe Pageant 
A "newcomer on the block" and "a long shot," she sur- 
prised herself by winning the crown. "I was actually hop- 
ing just to place," she said. 

She is approaching the national pageant with the same 
equanimity. "If I place, I'll be happy, and if I win, I'll be 
pleasantly surprised," she said. "I'm going to do the best 
job I can representing Illinois." 



Sherri Hicks and family. Bob, Lauren and Brittany, enjoy a visit with 
Congressman Phil Crane. 



. 






Lakeland Newspapers 23 



■ .- -i. .1 




[Fare 



Papai Players present 'Winnie the Pooh' 

The Papai Player's will 
open their production of 
"Winnie the Pooh," Oct.. 2 at 
Cutting Hall, 150 Wood Street 
in Palatine. 

This one-hour musical is 
an all time favorite. 
Performances are set Oct 2 
through Oct. 26 with sched- 
uled performances Oct 2, 9, 
16 and 23 at 10 a.m. and on 
Columbus Day, Oct 11 at 10 
a.m. and 12:30 p.m. 
Additional performances are 
Oct 14 at 10 a.m., Oct 22 at 
10 a.m. and Oct 26 at 10 am. 
Tickets are $5 or $4 each with 
groups of 20 or more. 

The Papai players is an 
adult theatre company that 
has been performing for chil- 
dren and their families in the 
community for over 16 years. 
Joann Minds ofNorthbrook as Kanga and SaranMlndon For more information call 
of Crystal Lake as Rou In scene from Papal Players 359-9556. 
"Winnie the Pooh" 

Zanies to present fall children's show 

Riding on the success of its First Ever Children's Show, Zanies Comedy Club in Vernon 
HUls will present its next Children's Show.on Oct 2 at 1 p.m. The type of entertainment 
presented is enjoyable not only for the young, but also for the young at heart The show 
will feature entertainment appropriate for children ages 3 to 12. 

The afternoon will continue at the Discovery Zone with play for all children who 
attend the Zanies show. The ticket price for the show and playtime is inclusive at $9.95 
per children. Tickets for the show are only $6 per child. Adults are free. The kitchen at 
Zanies will be open for lunch and the doors to the showroom open one hour before show- 
time. 

Zanies is located at 230 Hawthorn Village Commons just a half-mile west of Rte. 21 on 
the north side of Rte. 60. 

For tickets and more information call 549-6030. 




CLC theatre department to open children's play 

"Puss in Boots," the College of Lake County theatre department's fall children's pro- 
duction, will open Friday, Oct. 8 in the CLC auditorium. 

Written by Max Bush, the classic fable will entertain the audience as they witness the 
travel adventures of Claude, the youngest son of a miller, and his loyal cat The clever 
puss wins his master's boots in fair combat, and they set out to find their fortune. During 
their travel, they meet a king and his lovely daughter and a monster who vows to marry 

her. 

The play, recommended for children ages 4-10, is directed by Robert J. Coscarelll, 
CLC's theatre Instructor. Tickets are $5 for the general public arid $3 for children and 
CLC students. For group rates call 223-3623. For tickets call 223-6601 , ext 2300. 

The show will be presented at the College of Lake County's auditorium, 19351 W. 
Washington Street, Grayslake, Oct 8 at 10 am. and 1 p.m.; Oct 9 at 2 and 7:30 p.m. and 
Oct 10 at 2 p.m. The show will also be presented Oct 17 at 2 p.m. at Stevenson High 
School and Oct. 23 at 2 p.m. at Lake Zurich High School. 

Spinning top crosses into younger generation 

Children, youth and adults who may have missed the chance as a child to spin tops; 
are all welcome at the Top Museum's class on spinning the old-fashion peg top. Some 
people recall it by the mane of the throw top, casting top or string top. 

The two part class is Oct 7 and 14 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at 533 Milwaukee Avenue in 
Burlington, Wis. The instructor is Judith Schulz, top expert for MGM film. Participants 
receive a high quality wood top with metal top and the two lessons for $18 or just $15 for 
members of Teacher Place & Parent Resources, where the museum is also located. 

Advanced paid registration is required. For more information call (414) 763-3946 or 
728-5623 for more information.— -by RHONDA VTNZANT 




the night . . . 



Friday 

Get ready to rock with Rare Earth at Shades, 21860 N. Milwaukee Ave., Deerfield, 
634 -BLUE. Opening band is Soul Pigs . . . Dave Anderson and the I-LItes, world 
beat rhythm, comes to Slice of Chicago, 36 S. Northwest Hwy., Palatine, 991-2150 . . 
. Easy Louise Is at Sundance Saloon, Routes 176 and 83 in Mundclcln, 949-0858. 



Saturday 

The Saints, blues rock, will be featured at Christies, Grass Lake Road and Route 83, 
Antioch, 395-2885 . . . Savoy Brown is at Shades . . . Guy Lawrence and Chldeco 
Zydeco, saucy Cajun boogie, at Slice of Chicago . . . Easy Louise at Sundance 
Saloon.— by CLAUDIA M.LENART 








3- personally pp 
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away, Mail or fax 
the coupon in this week's 
classified section or call 

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2-1/2 Miles W. Of Rt. 59 On Grass Lake Rd. East Shore Of Grass Lake 

Open Dally 10 to 5, Closed Mondays (7 08} 395-2 250 



24 lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,-1993 



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celand Leisure 



Schaefer to appear 



"Friday Morning Spotlight," an excit- 
ing new program at Gorton 
Community Center, featuring out- 
standing lecturers and performers, .will 
make its debut on Oct. 1 at 10 a.m. 
Tickets are on sale for $5 each. Cabaret 
singer and actress Trish Schaefer will 
present "Celebrating What Passes By" 
with pianist Augie Wegner. The act 
| encompasses Broadway show tunes, 
classic songs from the '20s through the 
'60s, torch songs, and character num- 
bers. For further information call 234-6060. 

Classical season opens 

Lake Forest Symphony will open Its 1993- 
94 Classical Season on Oct 1 and 2 with a Gala 
Opening featuring the works of contemporary 
American composer Russell Peck, who has 
been titled "The George Gershwin of. the 21st 
Century." LFS' season will feature six pairs of 
subscription concerts, Holiday Pops concert 
and educational concerts for children. Season 
subscriptions are available for $135 for pre- 
ferred seating or $100 for peripheral seating. All 
concerts begin at 8 p.m. and are held at 
Rhoades Auditorium, Chicago Medical School, 
3333 Green Bay Rd., North Chicago. Single tick- 
ets are $26 or $20 per person. For ticket Infor- 
mation call 295-2135. 

Vocal lessons offered 

Jim Ams, professional choral director, will 
teach vocal lessons on Wednesdays now 
through OcL 20 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Lessons 
are sponsored by the Melodeers Chorus at St 
Peter's Church, 2700 Willow Rd., in 
Northbrook. For Information call Phyllis at 246- 
0222 or Lori at (312)736-4043. 

Suburban symphony 

The North Suburban Symphony will open 
its sixth season at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Oct 17 in 
the Baggett Auditorium at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake Forest. 
Featured will be William Vcr Meulcn, first horn 



with the Houston Symphony. Four concerts are 
presented by the North Suburban Symphony 
each year. Subscription price for all four is $32, 
$23 for seniors and students. Single tickets are 
available for $10 each, $7 for seniors and stu- 
dents. 

'Recent Works' 

The 13th annual "Recent Works 
I Exhibition," a juried competition, will 
be held Oct. 1 through Nov. 7 at the 
College of Lake County, 19351 W. 
Washington St., Grayslake. The 
Community Gallery of Art is sponsored 
by the College of Lake County 
Foundation. An opening reception will 
be held on Friday, Oct 1 from 7:30 to 
9:30 p.m. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 10 
'p.m., Monday through Thursday; 8 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m., Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday. For 
further information call 223-6601, ext. 2240. 

Fall art sale 

Artcetera, the College of Lake County's sales 
and rental gallery, will hold a fall sale on art- 
work, jewelry, ceramics and glass Items. The 
sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Oct. 4 
through 7 in the gallery located in the Learning 
Resource Center on the Grayslake campus. For 
Information call 223-6601, ext 2405. . 
t 

'California Suite 1 

Kirk Players theater company pre- 
sents "California Suite," a comedy 
written by Neil Simon. This show is 
not Intended for young audiences. 
Performances are Friday and Saturday, 
Oct 1 and 2 at 8 p.m. at Mundelein 
High School, 1350 W. Hawley. Pro- 
ceeds will be donated to Omni Youth 
Services Greenhouse Program. Ticket 
prices are $5 for adults, $3 for students 
and $2 for senior citizens. For more 
details call John Lynn at 566-6594. 




Gigl WUIding and Don Crop now 
appearing in 'The Sunshine Boys' at 
PM&L Theatre In Antloch. 

'Sunshine Boys' 

This Is the last weekend to see PM&L's pro- 
duction of NeU Simon's "The Sunshine Boys," 
directed by Frank DIMarco of Antioch. 
Remaining show dates are Oct. 1, 2 and 3. 
Friday and Saturday performances are at 8 p.m. 
with a Sunday matinee at 2:30 p.m. For ticket 
reservations call 395-3055. 

'Kabuki Medea' 

First staged at Wisdom Bridge Theatre In 
1983, "Kabuki Medea," an extraordinary the- 
atrical event that has been seen by thousands 
across the United States and around the world, 
is being presented at the Woodstock Opera 
House Oct 1 and 2. Presented in the highly 
visual and Intricate style of Japanese Kabuki 
theatre, Wisdom Bridge's production Is devot- 
ed to bringing the traditions of the East and 
West together with a low bow and a cunning 
handshake. Performances are Friday at 8 p.m. 
and Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m. For ticket infor- 
mation call (815)338-5300. 

'Zorba' 

Apple Tree Theatre opens its 11th season 
with "Zorba," the powerful musical celebrating 
one man's spirit and lust for life. The produc- 
tion opens Friday, Oct. 1 at 7:30 p.m. and runs 
through Sunday, Oct. 31. Apple Tree Theater is 
located at 595 Elm PL, Highland Park. Call 432- 
4335 for ticket reservations. 

'Sly Fox' 

Bowen Park Theatre Company at the Jack 



Benny Center for the Arts, 39 Jack Benny Dr., 
Waukegan presents Larry Gelbart's "Sly Fox." 
The adult comedy, directed by Mark Heller, 
runs weekends through Oct. 9; Curtain times 
are 6 p.m. except 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct 3 and 7:30 
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7. Tickets are $12, $10 for 
students and seniors. For reservations call 360- 
4741. 

General meeting 

The Waukegan Community Players' 
October general meeting will be held 
Wednesday, Oct 6 at 7:30 p.m. In Rosen wald 
Cottage In Bowen Park, N. Sheridan Rd. in 
Waukegan. All who are interested in theatre, 
either on stage or behind the scenes, are wel- 
come. For more Information call 662-0181. 



Buoys and Belles 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance Club 
is sponsoring a "Country Western 
Night" dance on Friday, Oct 1 from 8 
to 11 p.m. with a Plus Tip at 11 p.m. 
The dance will be held at First United 
Methodist Church, 128 N. Utica St., 
Waukegan. For more Information call 
336-2135. 



Casting call 



Casting for male parts in "The Magic 
of the Nutcracker" will be held at 
Dancenter North, 540 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Libertyville on Monday, Oct 4 at 7 p.m. Males 
of all ages from 7-year-old boys through men 
are needed. No dance experience is necessary, 
although athletic training and/or previous act- 
ing experience Is beneficial. Male and female 
gymnasts under five feet tall are also being 
sought. Interested gymnasts should call Cheri 
Lindell at 367-7970 for further details. 

Harvest Hoedown 

An old time barn dance, the "Harvest 
Hoedown," will be held 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 
Oct 9 at the Park District BIdg., 42 S. Seymour 
In downtown Grayslake. This is the first in the 
current series of traditional barn dances pre- 
sented by the Grayslake Community Park DIst, 
the second Saturday of the month. Free 
lessons will be offered at 7 p.m. Admission is 
S3 per person. Call 223-2081 for further infor- 
mation. 



Under 
12 



ENJOY SUNDAY BRUNCH 

Served 10 a.m. ■ 2 p.m. 

Adults '8.95 Children '4.50 

Children under 3 are FREE 

Featuring... 

•Hot Entrees •Belgium Waffles 

•Entrees for the "lighter* appetite 

•Ice .Cream Desserts •Fresh Fruit On season) 

•Omlettes made to order 

•Homemade pastries •Varied appetizers Including 

•Smoked Salmon -Salad & Fruit Bar 

•Comptlmentary Glass of Wine 



Entertainment by Carl Roth 



/SK\ 



BARK -N' TOWN 
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The Big Island 
Hawaii's "Last Frontier" 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Hordes of tourists, crowded beaches, streets lined with 
T-Shirt shops and people hawking tickets to the "best Luau 
on the island". If you only visit Waikiki, this may well be 
your impression of Hawaii. 

For those of us who want more than the "Don Ho 
Show" version of Hawaii, a visit to the "Big Island" is a 
visit to Hawaii's Last Frontier. 

The Big Island is, as the name implies, the largest of the 
five major islands making up the Hawaiian chain. The real 
name of the Big Island is actually "Hawaii", but everyone 
just calls it the Big Island to avoid confusion. 

Life on the Big Island is light years away from the hus- 
tle and bustle of Waikiki. This is not to say there is little to 
do on the Big Island. 

Boasting active volcanoes (Stay at the Volcano House 
for some spectacular nighttime fireworks!), a remote valley 
(Waipio Valley) reminiscent of Paradise, the largest cattle 
ranch in the United States (The Parker Ranch), the nation's 
only coffee plantations and world championship golf 
courses with hazards such as ancient Petroglyphs (rock 
drawings), you should find enough to fill your vacation. 

What about beaches, you ask? The Big Island's got 
them in white, black and even green! 

Richardson's Beach, behind the Richardson Ocean 
Center, on the south shore of Hilo Bay is the best black 
sand beach on the island. That green sand beach is near 
remote Kaulana Bay. 

If that's not enough, the Big Island even offers snow 
skiing. You heard me right, Between December and May 
the 13,796 high slopes of Mauna Kca often have enough 
snow to create five mile-long ski runs! There's an outfit 
called Ski Hawaii (808-885-4188) who will fix you up 
with all you need. 

Since the Big Island is just that - Big - split your stay by 
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Friday, October 1. 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 25 



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Dining and Entertainment 



Lakelife 



Lakeland 

Newspapers' 



Cedar Village craft show 

The Eleventh Annual Cedar Village Craft Festival will be held Saturday, Oct 2 from 9 amm- 
to 3 p.m. at 310 N. Milwaukee Ave. (three blocks north of Rte. 132), Lake Villa. Phone 356- 
3900 for more information. 



Applemani a hits Long Grove 



Long Grove is going to celebrate the apple harvest with a new festival for the historic village 
the weekend of Oct. I to 3. There will be apples galore, with five-pound bags for sale by the 
Long Grove Merchants Assn. Food booths will line the roads, with Long Grove food estab- 
lishments joined by outside vendors. Entertainment takes place with the Village Tavem Jazz 
Band and the Prairie Schooners. The Applefest parade will step out at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. For 
further Information, call 634-0888. 

YMCAAirfest 

The Lake County Family YMCA, a Lake County United Way Agency, will be hosting Its third 
annual YMCAAirfest on Oct. 2 and 3 at the Waukegan Regional Airport This year's event will include 
a trade and craft show. For further information call Peggy Blomstedt at 662-36J7 or Linda Nikutin at 
360-9622. 



Horse drawn hay ride 



loin a Forest Preserve naturalist for a horse drawn, hay ride tour of McDonald Woods Forest 
Preserve near Lindenhurst on Sunday, Oct 3. Choose from three different hay rides: 1:30 p.m. for 
ages 13 through adult, and 230 and 3:30 p.m. for all ages. Spaces are still available for all three hay 
rides, but reservations are required. The fee is $6 for Lake County residents, $10 for non county resi- 
dents. For more Information and to make reservations call 948-7750. 



Safe boating classes 



The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is offering a safe boating skills and seamanship class on 
Thursday, Oct. 7 from 730 to 9:30 p.m. at Fire Station No. 2, 306 Washington St., Ingleslde. For reser- 
vations call Dolores at 587-1036. 

Nutcracker artist to appear 

Christian Utbricht, one of Germany's leading makers of nutcrackers and smokers, will make a 
special appearance from 2 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct 8 at the Pine Cone Christmas Shop, 210 Robert 
Parker Coffin Rd., Long Grove. Visitors who already own an Ulbricht creation are invited to bring it 
with them to be autographed by Ulbricht Call 634-0990 for more details. 



Offer free 
vocal lessons 

The Championship 
Riverport Chorus is offer- 
ing free vocal instruction 
to all interested area 
women over age 18. The 
group lessons will cover 
all areas of vocal produc- 
tion. Instruction begins 
Tuesday, Oct 5 at Wilmot 
High School, Wilmot, Wis. 
from -7 to 10 p.m. and 
continues for six weeks 
(each Tuesday) through 
Nov. 9. 

The Riverport Chorus, 
currently at 100 members, 
invites all women to share 
the fun and excitement of 
four part harmony. For 
more information call 
356-6919. 



'Family' honors slapstick heritage 

"It Runs in the Family," now playing at the Forum Theater, upholds the finest 
traditions of farce: Mistaken identities, abrupt comings and goings, cross-dressing 
and obvious slapstick. 
The "plot, " of course, is sheer lunacy. 

Dale Benson stars as David Mortimore, a doctor at St Andrew's Hospital in 
I London caught up in an ever more entangling web of deception. It's sparked by 
| the unexpected return of Nurse Tate 
(Kathryn Nash), an old flame. She l 
(arrives in tow with an even bigger 
surprise, a teen-aged son— the prod- 
uct of their liaison some 18 years ago. 
The good doctor wants to shield his 
wife from these events, so he involves one of 

his cohorts, co-star Larry McCauley, who I ■ j \ 

plays Dr. Hubert Bonncy. 

The truism about "if you're going to tell a 
lie, make it a whopper" prevails, and soon 
many tall tales are floating around.. .too 
many to digest 

Benson arid McCauley rise to their 
demanding roles, mercifully without any 
attempt at British dialect. Spike-haired 
Jamie Baron comes across as a bit too old for 
the part of the rebel teen. Other minor char- " II R"" 8 <" l ^ e Family" spoofs doctors, 
acters pop on and off stage, contributing nurses, hospitals and patients at the 
odd bits of humor here and there. Forum Theater. 

Some of the gags can quickly grow tedious. How many times is it funny to see an unsus- 
pecting policeman squirted with a soda siphon or to witness a near-fall from a window 
ledge? The Brits may relish such nonsense, but it's generally not our cup of tea 

"It Runs in the Family" Is scheduled to run through Jan. 2. Ticket information on the 
theater In Summit, III. is available at 496-3000.— by TOM WHOM 




BRUNSWICK POOL TABLES 

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DATE: October 3, 1993 



TIME: 11:00 A.M. 



NOTE: A large selection of good quality nursery slock to be gold at auction prices. 
Planting and delivery service will be available. Loading assistance day of aale. 



EVERGREENS 
SCOTCH PINES 
BLUE SPRUCE 
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TERMS: Cash or Good Check. All items to be settled 
for day of sale. 

SALE MANAGED BY: Powers Auction Service, 
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INFORMATION: Country Corners Farm Market 
815-648-2301 ,; , ..,„.„. . . 

POWERS 

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DAN S. POWERS - MIKE W. POWERS 



26 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October!,! 99 3 



■ , 



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Dining and Entertainment 



Lakelife 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Forest preserves offer 
autumn with a view 




Autumn presents many beautiful 
changes in Lake County, from leaves 
turning colors to squirrels and 
chipmunks scurrying around for nuts to 
store and birds migrating south to get 
away from the long, barren winter. 

One of the best places to view these 
scenes arc at a Lake County Forest 
Preserve, which presents 18,700 acres 
of natural trails, fishing porfds and 
camping areas. 

Although the preserves operate on a 
yearly basis, Sue Hawkins, public 
information and marketing manager 
for the forest preserve, said fall Is one of 
their busiest times. 

"The fall is one of the more popular 
times because the colors arc out," 
Hawkins said. 

Three of the best preserves to watch 
leaves turn arc Ryerson Woods in the 
southeast portion of the county on 



Riverwoods Road, McDonald Woods in 
the northern portion of, the county at 
Grass Lake Road and Rte. 45 and 
especially along the Des Plalnes River 
Trail, Hawkins said. 

Autumn is also a great time to go for 
a hike or nature walk. For self-guided 
hikes, the Des Plaines River Trail 
cannot be beat, with a total of 18 miles 
of trail, starting near the Wisconsin- 
Illinois state line at Van Patten Woods, 
going south near Rte. 41 and Grand 
Avenue. It picks up again in the 
southern section near the Old School 
Forest Preserve near Rte. 176 and 
moving south for nine miles to Rte. 22. 

A large portion of the $30 million 
referendum the Lake County Forest 
Preserve Is asking voters to. approve on 
Nov. 2 will go towards a project to link 
up the trail so It wul be continuous 
from the northern portion of the county 
all the way south to Lake-Cook Road, 
Hawkins said. 

A guided nature tour program 
called Monday Movers travels to a 
different forest preserve each Monday 
where a guide tells visitors what they 
arc seeing and talks about the trees, 
leaves and the wildlife habitat. The 
program runs until Oct 18. 

The Lake County Museum in the 
Lakewood Forest Preserve in 
Wauconda will have a Native American 
story telling program on Oct. 27, with 
plenty of artifacts on display to help 
explain their lifestyle, Hawkins said. 

—by SPENCER SCHEIN 




Pictured from left: Russ Slade, Undenhurst; Tom Schrlmpf, Round Lake Beach; Unda Miller, 
Mundeleln; and Jamie Ann Slade of Mundeleln In scene from "California Suite." 

Neil Simon comedy to open 
Kirk Players 1993-94 season 



The Kirk Players will 
open their 28th season on 
Oct. 1 and 2 with the de- 
lightful Neil Simon com- 
edy, "California Suite." 
Performances will be held 
at 8 p.m. in the Mun- 
deiein High School the- 
ater, 1350 W. Hawley St 
All proceeds will be do- 
nated to Omni Youth Ser- 
vices. 

Individual ticket prices 
are: Adults $5, students $3, 
and senior citizens and 
children under 12 $2. 



Tickets may be purchased 
from Omni Youth Ser- 
vices, the Kirk Players or at 
the door. 

"California Suite" 
takes us into a posh hotel 
room where we are al- 
lowed to eavesdrop on a 
variety of guests over the 
course of a year. Neil Si- 
mon has given this hotel a 
fine blend of characters 
with troubles both funny 
and sad. This show 
should be considered to 
be of an adult nature due 



to some language and sit- 
uations. 

Directing the first act 
of the show is Maureen 
Cook Slade of Linden- 
hurst. The second act is 
directed by Mundelein 
resident Jon Leslie Lynn. 
Producer is John W. Lynn, 
founder/-director of the 
Kirk Players. - 

For further informa- 
tion on the Kirk Players 
and their coming season, 
call John W. Lynn at 566- 
6594. 



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Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 27 



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Fit! DAY 



| Parent Group 

Sometimes parents need help and understanding to 

J deal with the tough job of raising children. The Parent 

Group, Inc. sponsors weekly Parents Anonymous sclf- 

| help support groups at no charge. No cost structured 

j child care is available during all meetings. The support 

groups meet in Waukegan on Friday mornings from 9 to 

11 a.m.; Thursday evenings In Vernon Hills from 7 to 9 

p.m.; and in Zion on Tuesday evenings from 8 to 9 p.m. 

and Wednesday afternoons from 3 to 4:30 p.m. For more 

Information call 263-7272. 



SATURDAY 



PWP dance 

Parents Without Partners will hold a Saturday Night Dance on 
Oct 2 from 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. at Murphy's, located on the cor- 
ner of Wadsworth Road and Lewis Avenue in Wadsworth. Cost of 
the dance is 55. All single parents are invited. Parents Without 
Partners is devoted to the welfare of the single family. For further 



Information call Phil at 623-9364. 

Bowling mixer 

Solo Singles will be sponsoring a Bowling Mixer on Oct 2 at 
Wauconda Bowl, Rte. 176 in Wauconda at 8 p.m. Also, on OcL 6 
Solo Singles will hold their weekly dance a the Princess 
Restaurant, 1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, from B pm. to 
midnight For more information call 816-1011 or 362-6455. 



Til liS WAY 



Embroider's Guild 

Slide lecture "Design for Embroiderers" will be given by Lake 
Forest resident, d.j. Bennett at the OcL 5 meeting of the North 
Suburban Embroiders Guild. North Suburban Embroiderer's 
Guild meets at the Village Presbyterian Church in Northbrook at 
1300 Shermer Rd. on Tuesday, Oct 5 at 9:30 a.m. Cost is S3 for the 
lecture. For more Information call Toklko Blaine at 255-7545. 

Caring Group 

SL Gabriel's Church In Vernon Hills is offering Caring Groups, 
an opportunity for anyone, single, married, young and old to 
experience Christ's peace, love and understanding. Caring 
Groups meet every Tuesday at 7 p.m. For more information con- 
tact the Rev. Paul Heal, Jr. at 367-5510 or Janet Mai at 590-1458. 



the Uptown Ballroom, 6218 22nd Ave., Kenosha, Wis. from 8 to 11 
p.m. for dancing and socialization. For more information call 
Buzz at (414)652-1677. 



THURSDAY 



Exchange Club 



Young Single Parents 



For parents who are single, divorced or widowed, between the 
ages of 21 to 60, Join Young Single Parents Club every Tuesday at 




hel World 



'Striking' misses the boat 

For the sake of the families of the three action-hero 
hunks who own the Planet Hollywood nightclub chain, 
let's hope these theme watering holes make a better show- 
ing than their latest film efforts. 

Stallone has failed at comedy and this summer's action 
flick, "Cliffhanger" was greeted lukewarmly by many. 
Everyone knows about Arnold's summer faux pas, and 
now Bruce Willis comes out with a movie not even as good 
as the aforementioned film slips. 

Willis made it to the big screen with a wise-cracking 
sense of humor mixed in with an unkempt sex appeal. 

After the smasheroo "Die Hard" series, he had 
nowhere to go, but down and he's been sliding ever since 
via "Bonfire of the Vanities," and "Hudson Hawk." 

"Striking Distance" pulls out all the time-worn action- 
hero stops and comes up with a sub-mediocre water- 
logged adventure film about two cops, Willis and Sarah 
Jessica Parker, out to get a serial killer. 

This flick never quite gets one's interest despite the 
hair-raising water chase scenes. 

Even Robert Pastoreili, Murphy Brown's personal 
painter, can't pull this movie out of the doldrum pool it 
swirls in. 

Sorry Bruce-boy; we like you, but it's time to be more 




NOW ACCEPTING V0CAI STUDENTS 

• classical • musical theater 
• choral/ensemble singers • vocal coaching 

As an internationally respected singer/performer, I specialize 
in interpretive singing, net just technique. 
"...a full sound, always interesting... brings her character lo 
Kate Kulas-Milligan //fe....exce/fenl diction and acting,,.* OPERA NEWS 
Whether you are - or aspire to be - a professional singer...wish to prepare for audi- 
lions... develop an interpretive technique.. .build repertoire... or just want to enjoy 
your singing more... I can tailor a program especially for you and your voice. 

Call Kate Kulas-Milligan Vocal Studio ubcrtyvine 549-8630 

•Ask about the special no obligation 'Get Acquainted" lesson 






ffpm&jfZ 

\\£rf Presents Mjj 

GIVE EM HELL, 
HABRY1 

(Reminiscences of Harry S. Truman) 
Starring Bud Caldwell 

Fri. & Sat, OcL 8 & 9 at 8:00 p.m. 

Sun., Oct. 10 at 2:30 p.m. 

All Seats "7.00 



This Is a Special Fundraislng Production and a not part of oui 
regular season. Tickets will bo available in (he Lobby during 
'The Sunshine Boys', at the Box Otfice between 6 and B pm 
on Oct. 6 and 7 and at the door prior to each performance. 



Call for Reservations 395-3055 

PM&L Theatre* 817 Main St • Antioch 



script selective if you want to keep up with Demi. Ask her 
for her "Few Good Men" source. 

"Striking" rates two out of five stars and is rated "R."— 
by GLORIA DAVIS 




The Exchange Club of Grayslake meets every Thursday at 
noon at Randell's Restaurant In Grayslake. Visitors and prospec- 
tive members are invited to join the club for lunch and learn more 
about the Exchange. For more information and reservations con- 
tact Bob Wegge at 223-0777, Monlka O'Connor at 223-5547, or 
JoAnn Rltzwoller at 223-8161. 

Kids having kids 

Join the Lake County Coalition on Teen Pregnancy Thursday, 
OcL 7 from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Parkside Cafe and Banquet 
Center, 5572 W. Grand Ave. in Gurnee. Enjoy lunch and hear from 
speakers on housing and health Issues of pregnant and parenting 
teens, and learn how to deal with the challenge of working with 
this population. Learn what agencies provide services to pregnant 
and parenting teens, and how to better utilize area organization 
Cost is $15 for lunch and program. For more information call 
Donna Speer at 244-8306. 



COMING SOON 



Christian Singles 

The Christian Singles Group (age 50 and up) will meet at the 
Javelin Restaurant, located at the corner of Sheridan Road and 
Greenwood Avenue in Waukegan on Saturday, Oct 9 at 6 p.m. 
Following dinner the group will go to nearby Bowen Park Theater 
company to see the play "Sly Fox," a comedy. Curtain time Is 8 
p,m. Reservations are necessary and can be made by calling 662- 
7288. 

Sitzmark Ski Club 

Sitzmark Ski Club Oktoberfest on the Lake will be held Oct 17 
at Up the Street Bar on Long Lake in Ingleside from 1 p.m. to clos- 
ing. Beer, brats, wine, soda and prizes for some of the contests the 
will be going on throughout the day, for a fee of $10 per person. 
Information on Midwestern and western winter skip trips will be 
available. For furfter information call 356-5171. 



v/j5 



WEDDING GOWN? 
LET IT WORK FOR YOU 



We Will SELL It For You 
We Will RENT It For You 
We Will BUY It From You 

Also Mother's Dresses 

For More In Formation CaIL 
^ ^ 546-Q9 59 or 22^0022 



N DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATIN 

£ LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 70B-5500000 ' I 

.., ROUTE 12 EAST OF ELA RD., LAKE ZURICH S 

S6.00 ADULTS • S3.00 CHILDREN (Under 11) c 

Cv S3.00 MON.-FRI. UNTIL 5 PM, SAT. & SUN. UNTIL 2:30 PM p 



Bruce WH lis 



Belvidere Mall 

THEATRES 662-7410 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



$1.50 all seats all shows Ample Parking 

TOM & JERRY (G) RISING SUN (R) 



MOVIES AND TIMES START 10- 
COOL RUNNINGS (PG} 
THE FUGITIVE (PG13) 
MALICE (R) 

AGE OF INNOCENCE (PG) 
THE GOOD SON (R) 
THE PROGRAM (R) 
FOR LOVE OR MONEY (PG) 
STRIKING DISTANCE (R) 



1-93 

1:15-3:504:104:15 

12:45-3:304:10-9:10 

1:30-4:104:204:45 

1.3:404:25-9:05 

2:30-4:30-7-9 

t;45-4 -6:308:55 

2-4:15*15-8:30 

; 1:30-3:50-8:204:30 



Fri, Moo-Thur 4:1 5-5:50 
Sal & Sun 1:00-2:404:15-5:50 

FORTRESS (R) 

Daily 7:35-0:40 

JASON GOES TO HELL (R) 

Fri, Mon-Thur 3:15-5:15-7:35-0:35 
Sol & Sun 1:1S-3;15-S;15-7;30-0:3S 



Fri, Mon-Thur 4:00-7:004:35 
Sal & Sun 1:30-4:00-7:00-6:35 

HOCUS POCUS (G) 

Fri, Mon-Thur 5:30-7:30 
Sal & Sun 1:05-5:30-7:30 

WHAT'S LOVE GOT 
TO DO WITH IT (R) 

Daily 3:05-9:40 




THLVtU 



ClNEplEX OdJEON THEATRES 



m The Good Son (R) (Dolby) 
1:30-3:30-5:30.7:30.9:30 



'The Age of Innocence (PG) (Dolby) (on 2 screens) 
l:20-2:3O-4:05-5:l5-7;0O-B:00-9;45 weekdays 7:00-8:00-9:45 



Striking Distance (R) (Dolby) 

1:15-3:20-5:25-7:35-9:45 



SHOWPLACE 1-7 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31, CRYSTAL LAKE 

S5.00 ADULTS • S3.00 CHILDREN (Under 11) 
$3.00 MON.-FRI, UNTIL 5 PM, SAT. & SUN. UNTIL 2:30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES START 10-T-93 

COOL RUNNINGS (PG) 2:20-4:204:354:35 . 

THE FUGITIVE (PG13) 1:20-3:50-6:1 54:55 

MALICE (R) 1:45-4:15-6:30 8:45 

THE GOOD SON (R) 2:30-4:30-74 

THE PROGRAM (R) . " 1:50-4:104:25 8:50 

AGE OF INNOCENCE (PG) 1:15-3:454:20-9 

STRIKING DISTANCE (R) 2-44:454:45 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY 

••• 



T I I X I I IT XIII I 



SHOW PLACE 8 • 26 N. WILLIAMS ST., CRYSTAL LAKE 
81 5-455-1005 



The Fugitive (PG-13) (Dolby) 

l-J0-4:lS-7:00-9;45 



True Romance (R) (Dolby) 

dally 9:20 



M Bronx Tale (R) (Dolby) 

2:10-4:40-7:10-9:40 



Into the West (PG) (Dolby) 

1:40-3:35-5:30-7:25 weekday* 7:25 



Cool Runnings (PG) (Dolby) 
1:00-3:05.5:10-7:15-9:20 



*Malicc (R) (Dolby) 

2:15-4:35-7:10-9:25 



FOR LOVE OR MONEY (PG) 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 

378 LAKE ST., ANTIOCH 

395-0216 



JURASSIC PARK (PG13) 



LIBERTYVILLE 1 & 2 

708 N. MILWAUKEE 

LIBERTYVILLE 

362-3011 



IN THE LINE OF FIRE (R) 



FRI., MON.-THURS. 7-9 
SAT, & SUN. 2:30-4 :30-7-9 



■4" ADULTS *2" CHILD |11 ft Under| 

'2" UNTIL 5 PM 



FRI.. MON.-THURS. 6:30 3 
SAT. & SUN. 1:15-3:454:30-9 



*3 H ADULTS M" CHILD (lift Under) 

M" FIRST AFTERHQOH SHOW L 



FRL MON.-THURS. 6:30-9 
SAT. & SUN. 1:3044:30 9 



.UNDERCOVER BLUES (PGtt)*!- 80 A " S * at * DAILY 6*5-8:45 



1 *2.00 All Seats - All Shows 
SECRET GARDEN |G) SAT. & SUN. 1:45-4 



McHENRY 1 &2 

204 GREEN ST., McHENRY 

■(815)3850144 



! 3" ADULTS M" CHILD |11 ft Under) 
M" UNTIL 5 PM 



The Program (R) 

2:30-4:5 0-7:20-9:40 



Sleepless in Seattle (PG) 
2:00-4:20.7:00-9:15 



For Love or Money (PG). 
1:45-3:45.5:45-7:45-9:45 



JURASSIC PARK (PG13) 



SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE (PG) 



FRI., MON.-THURS. 0:15 0:45 
SAT. & SUN. 1:15-3:454:154:45 



DAILY 6:45-9 



J 52.00 ALL SEATS-FREE WILLY (PG) sat. & sun. 2:15-4:30 

ni HliiiiiiTTTrrr-rtJ 



*4 



>~> 



28 Lakeland Newspapers 



■ '«* i •* ■' 



Friday, Octobor 1 , 1993 



... 

... 



r t tw^5?^,^^*»5!S«^ ., . 



WWWfiSiti' 



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^T/t.*rJ 



IX - 



J3SJfc«-£isa?, 



Dining and Entertainment 



Lakelife 



Lakeland 

NewapupetB 



ACROSS 

1. lulgar — 

Burroughs 
5. Formerly owned 
9, Old crone 

12. Like a — 
of bricks 

13. Newspaper 
section 

14. — pro nobis 

15. Equine 
competition 

17. Margin 

18. Pure form 
' of trona 

19. Ore analysis 
21. Very pale 

24. Curved molding 

25. Playwright 
Anita 

26. Made beloved 

30. Hockey star 

31. City on the 
Moselle 

32. Pic — mode 

33. Dieter's 
no-nos 

35. 1.D. mark ' 

36. Special limes 

37. Short essay 

38. Subject under 
discussion 

40. Scarlett's 
home 

42. OPEC's concern 

43. Wild lettuce 

48. Explorer 
Johnson 

49. Author Wiesel 

50. French 
novelist 

51. Low island 

52. Story of 
heroic deeds 

53. Break suddenly 
DOWN ' 

1. College cheer 

2. TV actor 
Robert 

3. The heart 

4. Follows 




5. One of the 22. One type 
Bears of loser? 

6. District of 23. Rough and 
London tumble fun 

7. DDE's command 24. Pindaric 

8. Titled widow worics 

9. Kentucky derby 26 - Makes a 
• mistake 



10. Opera bonus 

11. Slightly 
tainted 

16. Sea bird 

20. Vast quantity 

21. Opposed to 
feud 



27. — picker 

28. Actor Jack 

29. Challenge 
31. Instructs 



■ 34. — Lanka 
35. Shoulder wraps 

37. Three (Hal.) 

38. Captured 

39. River in France 

40. H.S. math 

41. Confused 

44. Palm leaf: 
var. 

45. Lunch ending 

46. Airport info 

47. Party mix 



■IIJ.jB felDilB USH 

caeai&HQHca Emu 



MaVllDl \d\0\L 



Eragnsu eraas 
anra EErasiiSESia 




Author Ackerman to present poetry reading 




Diane Ackerman 



Waukegan-bom Diane 
Ackerman, the author of 
the best-selling nonfictlon 
book, "A Natural History of 
the Senses." and the au- 



thor of five collections of 
poetry, will present a po- 
etry reading session from 
9:30 to 11 a.m. on Oct. 7 In 
the blue lecture hall a the 
College of Lake County 
Grayslake campus, 19351 
W. Washington St. 

Ackerman' s highly ac- 
claimed "A Natural His- 
tory of the Senses" will be 
the "subject of a five-hour 
PBS television series next 
fail. She is also the author 
of "The Moon By Whale 
Light," a collection of na- 
ture essays; and "A Natural 
History of Love," to be 
published by Random 
House in 1994. Currently 
she is working on "The 
Rarest of the Rare," a col- 



lection of essays about 
endangered animals. Her 
poetry collections include 
her most recent "Jaguar of 
Sweet Laughter: New and 
Selected Poems." 

A staff writer at "The 
New Yorker," Ackerman 
has received many hon- 
ors, Including the 
Academy of American 
Poets' Peter I. B. La van 
Award and grants from 
the National Endowment 
for the Arts and the Rocke- 
feller Foundation. 

The program is free 
and open to the public. 
For information call 
Paulette Roeske, at 223- 
6601, ext 2956. 



ARIES (March 21 to April 19) 
You'll fighl, kiss, and make up early 
-in the week when a small difference' 
reveals how much you core Tor each 
olher. A disappointment in a 
. friendship could dampen your mood 
for socializing now. Origirtaliiy and 
intuition combine to bring you suc- 
cess in business. 

TAURUS (April 20 lo May 20) 
Though shopping for the home is a 
plus, you should guard against ex- 
travagant spending on pleasure pur- 
suits. Others are slow in gelling back 
to you this week. Delays in business 
are likely. Be patient, and con- 
centrate on immediate tasks. 

GEMINI (May 21 lo June 20) 
You're especially charming and per. 
sonablc this week and will receive 
admiration and compliments. 
Negotiations about financial matters 
could break down now. It's a poor 
week to get feedback for your ideas. 
Don't let someone's indifference 
discourage you. 

CANCER (June 21 lo July 22} 
This is not a good week toscck a loan 
or for shopping. Slay on lop of cur- 
rent financial obligations and iry to 
keep expenditures lo a minimum. 
Family matters are highlighted later 
in the week. For the weekend, loved 
ones will share lime alone together. 
LEO (July 23 lo August 22) As 
you're easily distracted now, extra 
self-discipline will be needed on the 
job. The end of the week will go a lot 
better for you, i f you do not expect lo 
be the center of attention. A partner 
may seem preoccupied. You may 
overspend when socializing, but 
you'll be having fun limes ihis 
weekend. 

VIRGO (August 23 lo September 
22) It's besl to be low-key where 
business interests arc concerned this 
week. It's not a good lime lo force 
issues. However, behind-the-scenes 
moves bring benefits. The sqme old 
routine could be boring to you. Try 
not lo dwell on limitations. 

LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) A dispute that arises will quickly 



be resolved. It's a great week for 
gelling together with your friends for 
happy social limes. News comes 
from afar. Duties in connection with 
child-rearing should be a priority ihis 
weekend, so set everything else 
aside. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) You're on the right 
track where business interests .are 
concerned. New opportunities arise 
now. Concern about a domestic mai- 
ler may interfere with your con- 
centration at work later in the week. 
A quarrel while socializing this 
weekend may disrupt harmony. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to 
December 21) You may receive an 
invitation to some place special for 
the weekend. Tension is likely about 
a career concern. You're a bit unsure 
of yourself and may not be at your 
best in getting ideas across lo others. 
Plans involving travel arc difficult (o 
bring to final stages ihis week. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 lo 
January 19) You may have second 
thoughts about a financial matter. A 
co-worker may be envious of your 
accomplishments. Good will, how- 
ever, brings you gains in business. 
Don't let a temporary cash flow 
problem gel you down. Just stick to 
budgets. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) You should go easy on 
your* use of credit this week. How- 
ever, you'll have a lovely lime at a 
favorite restaurant or entertainment 
spot. You could be wrapped up in 
your own concerns later in the week 
and may not be as attentive as you 
could be to others' needs. Try lo be 
there when needed. 

PISCES (February 19 to March 
20) New chances for success arise in 
business (his week. Minor friction 
with a partner is quickly abated. A 
sea of paperwork may seem to be loo 
much to handle. Concentrate on one 
thing at a time. The weekend favors 
family inicrcsis and having company 

over. 

1 003 by Kins F«»tur«« Synd. 




The following information for class 
reunions are: 

Wauconda Class of 1983 will be held 
Friday, Oct. 1, Homecoming weekend, 
Harrington Banquets in Barrington; 

Warren Twp. High School Class of 1968 
is seeking alumni for their 25th Class 
Reunion to be held Oct. 1-2 at In-Laws 
Resturant, 720 N. Milwaukee Ave., Gurnee. 
For information call Linda Craig Nelson at 
367-6146. 

Warren -Twp. High School Class of 1973 
will be held at Midland Country Club, Oct. 
2. Call Carol at 223-5738 for details. 

Round Lake Class of 1983 will be held 
Saturday, Oct. 2, Homecoming weekend, 
Holiday Inn in Mundelein. 

Beach Park Grammar School Classes of 
1963-66 will be held Oct, 8, the Holiday Inn 
in Gurnee. 

Zion-Benton Class of 1984 is seeking 



classmates for 1994. 

Barrington Class of 1983 will be held 
Friday, Oct. 8, Homecoming weekend, 
Barrington Banquets in Barrington. 

Barrington Class of 1984 is seeking 
classmates for 1994. 

Stevenson Class of 1983 Is seeking class- 
mates for the Oct. 16 reunion, held at 
Deerfield Hyatt in Deerfield. 

Lake Zurich Class of 1973 will be held 
Saturday, Oct. 9, Homecoming weekend, 
the Princess in Libertyville. 

Lake Zurich Class of 1968 will be held 
Saturday, Oct. 9 at Hackney's in Lake 
Zurich. 

For more information contact Alumni 
Systems, Inc. at (815)477-0858 or (800)924- 
6643 (Chicago/suburban area only) or write' 
to: Alumni Systems, Inc. 6201 Scott Lane, 
Crystal Lake, IL 60014. 



1 



WHERE TO EAT OUT 



£1 



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■ 



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Audftea 




Fine Dining, Casual Atmosphere 
We're Here To Serve You, Our 29th Year 



Join Us Sun., Oct, 17th for 

Oktobekfest 

Live Entertainment by , 
Lit Richard and his Band 
Oktoberfest Buffet 3-7 p.m. 
$19.95 per person 

Entertainment only 
$ 6.00 per person 



OFmRACK BETTING 

with our fine dining 

room service 



RnalLiveSIiowoft1wl993 
dinner-theatre season 

Neil Simon's 

"Come Blow Your Horn" 

Nov. 6, 7, 12, 13, 14,19,20, 
21. 26 & 27 

Fri. '20.00 "1 Includes 
Sat. '23.00 1- dinner & 
Sun. '21,00 1 show 



I?ays In n loca tedn ext door 

Banquet facilities for 

all occasions 



1/2 mile north of Rtc. 173 on Rt. 12 • Richmond 
For Reservations cnii 815-670-2671 



■j 



Fish Boil 
Every Friday 

Served 5:00-9:00 p.m. 
•Soup 

•Salad Bar 

•3 Varieties of Fish Plus One Special Entree 

•Fresh Rye & Cinnamon Rolls 
0nly$^Jf95 

m All You can Eat 







S419Kcfioiha$r. B , iJ3 i eik. tattOtftt. I? 
(815)678-2631 RIchmond.lt 



^&Bi£ Introducing 

Ccuoo6 Qove: 



£: NOW 
OPEN 



'nv< 



Open 

Daily at 

11 n.m. 



n\ 



•Restaurant T/^o^T 'Banquets 

•Lounge ^ a^aSwX 

•Carry Outs j&\^ -Catering 

u on Kings Island 

Open for Lunch & Dinner featuring our 
Italian-American Salad Bar 

Steaks • Chicken • Veal • Pasta 
& Our Own Original Capo's Stuffed Pizza 

"Italian American Cuisine & "Then Some" 

973-0001 



Friday, October 1 , 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 29 



mmB *mm 






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*•»*.-+. ,— *_^,_1.^.> , * . . 



mi- 

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HV 
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T>y RJs already famous Thin Oust, Doubkr 
Decker or Pan Plzzat Or stop In any day for ono 
of our All-U-Can-Eat spec/ate/ Plus, RJ's Is 
perfect for thai special Birthday Party, Wedding 
Rehearsal or Shower. "Stop In Today! 



Join Us For 

MONDAY NIGHT 

FOOTBALL 

M DRAFT BEER • FREE APPETIZERS 



m 



Visit the Outback! Our Full-Service Bar 

Italian & Mexican Specialties • Ribs • Steakj • 
Broaated Chicken • Large Salad Bar - 1/2-lb. Burgers 

Bring Your Famllyl Video Game Room For Kids 





[free! 

I l Liter of RC or I 
, Diet RC with 
■ delivery of any ■ 
J large or family 
*■ size pizza 

IUmtt m tiwif— yr iriic. I 
N*TiUd with »*»•<>«■•«*•. I 



Thin Crust Pizza 
Pasta Dishes 
Sandwiches 

«"** | IXUywt 'I.H Wxtn. 

Our Famous fr * — — — ^~— | 

DOUBLE | FREE I 

DECKERI Pitcher of I 

PITTA I Soda with I 

ru,tA | any family | 

s J S. Whitney • Grayslake | size pizza | 

tMetlaOahf. 
Hut T.I14 with tar *th*r «0*r. 



We Deliver 548"4000 





u 

T 



One stop does it all at 
Luigi f s of Hong Kong 






•■--.. •.■,..< i 



Diners will find the best of two 
continents at Luigi's of Hong Kong, 235 
Rand Road, in Lake Zurich. 

"We offer a complete Chinese and a 
complete Italian menu," said new owner 
Gene Pontillo, who bought the business a 
couple of months ago. "We have a large 
carry-out business." 

Pontillo plans to make a few changes 
in the already successful operation. 

"We're going to embellish on the 
menu. We're going to add some specialty 
Chinese and Italian dishes," he said. 
"We'll probably start a luncheon buffet." 

One change that sports fans can look 
forward to is the addition of an eight-foot 
projection screen in the large bar. 

The current menu offers a large 
selection of tropical drinks, as well as a 
mouth-watering array of ethnic 
appetizers. 

. The Chinese menu lists all the most 
popular oriental favorites as well as tasty 
treats such as Phoenix and Pearls, stir- 
fried chicken and scallops with 
vegetables, and Chow Won Ton, 
barbecue pork, chicken, shrimp and 
vegetables over won tons. 

For those with a taste for Italian 



cuisine, Luigi's offers unusual temptations 
like Rigatoni AH'Arrabbiata,. pasta with 
"fire sauce" served with a large glass of 
ice water, and Cioppino, a delightful 
blend of seven kinds of seafood served 
over pasta and topped with marinara 
sauce. 

These wonderful selections are all 
priced at $12.95. The portions are 
generous. 

"No one has ever been able to finish 
one of our dinners,"'said Pontillo. 

. Those who have difficulty deciding 
between the Italian and Chinese menu 
may opt for one of the two combination 
dinner specials offered for $9.95 Monday 
through Thursday. A different taste blend 
is featured each day. Can't decide 
between Mongolian Beef and Fettuccini 
Alfredo? If it's Wednesday you can have 
both. 

Other specials are featured each day in 
addition to the extensive menu which 
covers five pages of every imaginable 
Chinese or Italian dish as well as a few 
American favorites. 

"Where shall we go for dinner? 
Italian? Chinese? Steak?" 

Luigi's of Hong Kong is the answer. 



THE DEAN TAGGART FAMILY 







^%, 
*% 



FRIDAY 
FISH FRY 



' Located tn beautiful downtown GUmtr" 

438-0300 

"A FAMILY 

RESTAURANT" 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

Lunch & Dinner 

Breakfast on Sundays 

Children's Portions & Prices 



BESIRIBS 
IN TOWN 



Gilmer & Midlothian Roads • Mundelein, Illinois 60060 




Open 7 days a week 

for Dinner. Mon.-Fri. 

for Lunch 



ADD A TAIL 

You can add a 1/3 lb. lobster tail to any entree on 
our menu any day of the week. $©95 



Sunday Country Brunch 

9a.m.-1:3Qp.rn. 

*6' m A.ttms*3 H3 lO&uhdV 

*l ,m ihKi,T3 



OnRL120-2 1/2mllGS 
West oi Rl. 1 2 on UJy Lake lust 
10 minutes west of Grayslake. 

(815)385-9869 




Sleakllouio 



BHHHBHBHHHHHHHHHHHHHBHHBBHHHBa 

GREAT 



FRIDAY FISH FRY 

Cod served with potato pancakes & 
clam chowder. All You Can Eat . . , 



oil 



$ 6.95l £ 



"'swsasjsssssssg: 



DAILY I CI 

wmwmmm 



BROASTED CHICKEN SERVED DAILY | ! 

WED. & SAT. SPECIAL 

I Half Broasted Chicken Dinner 



] SATURDAY NIGHT SPECIAL ~ ' 1 Q 



IUQ t^yQyyuuiOQyuUttUS 




COMPLETE 
ASTA DINNER! 
& DRINK 



Satisfy your appetite for a dinner with real value. 
With our Pasta Perfect Dinners, you can choose 

Irorn Spaghetti, Mostaccioll, or Vermicelli *ala 

Red Noodle,' Including garlic bread, a soil drink 

orcoffee lor just '2.95. 

Add our fresh salad bar for just '2.00 more. 

Every Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Sunday evening. 

No Substitutions. 

223-7010 





FAMILY RESTAURANT 



BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER * OPEN 24 HR. 



+ . FARM STYLE * * 
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/Ss 4am •9am 

© ONLY $2.95 * * 



FRIDAY FISH FRY # 
ALL-U-CAN-EAT* * 

ONLY $5.95 ® 



On Rte. 83 
Just N. Of Rollins 
Round Lake Beach 



NICE ATMOSPHERE 

Private Room For 
Party Up To 60 People 

PH0HE 

708-689-0733 

Fno mlnu toi (ran 6 Flag* Gnat Amorisa. Two Mirmtos From Croat Laket Naval Bate, 



REASONABLE PRICES.. FAST SERVICE 

•Salsdi, Fresh Fruit Fillet 
•Boalood, Cloaki & Cliopi 
Mldian Food, Qrouted Chicken 
•Om eletl m, Pancakes 
•Bi scuts I Gravy, Steak & Eggs 
•Homemade SpocoJ i, Bos A Crfces 
•New York fityte Cheesecakes 





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30 Lakeland Newspapers 



FiJday.Octpperl, 1°93 



• 



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Loon Lake 

Specializing in: CHICKEN •BIBS 
SEAFOOD • STEAKS • PIZZA 



JOIN US IN OUR EXPANDED 

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FOOTBALL GAMES 

75$ TAPPERS & FREE 
PIZZA AT 1/2 TIME 



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Anyone wearing a skirt gets 
2 FREE DRINKSI ^ 



Hour*: 

Mori. 4 pjrL-Mitiniajit 

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Sun. tl iju.-llp.ni. 

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THE EARLY BIRD RETURNS 

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Tues.-Fri. Dinner 4:00-5:00 p.m. 

Onry*5.95 Reg.«6.95 





Warsaw Inn serving up 
a smorgasbord of dishes 





Seeing buffet tables lined with 
homemade baked goods galore, and 
mounds of luscious entrees and salads at 
Zubrzycki's Warsaw Inn, 217 N. Rte. 31 
(Front St.), will no doubt set your mouth 
watering, and your taste buds tingling for 
the truly authentic Polish-American 
Smorgasbord of fine fare that the 
McHenry business has to offer. 

The celebrated family-owned 
restaurant's motto "We have something 
for everyone," couldn't be more precise 
with the over 80 entrees that the 
scrumptious buffet and menu has to 
offer. 

"Everything is homemade fresh every 
morning," entrepreneurs Joe Zubrzycki 
and Bcrnicc Zubrzycki-Nemz proudly 
announce of the Inn's baked goods, and 
delectable sausages. 

Try the fabulous weekend champagne 
brunch at $8.95. Brunch hours are 11 
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturdays, and 10 
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Sundays. 

The fabulous evening buffet is also 
open on Saturday and Sunday. 

The Early Bird returns as every 
Tuesday through Friday from 4 p.m. to 5 
p.m. dinners arc $5.95. 

The dinner specials arc out of this 

world! On Tuesdays it's roast duck served 

. with dressing and the chefs special. The 

Wednesday features arc tangy BBQ baby 

back ribs, beef liver and the chefs special, 



all you can eat at $6.95 with the 80-item 
buffeL Turkey and dressing, corned beef, 
and the chefs special area the treats for 
Thursdays. 

Fish and seafood are the catch for 
Friday's special. Ocean perch, baked cod, 
cod with dill sauce, catfish, and whitefish 
provide a virtual sea of great eating. For 
the landlubbers, Friday's specials also 
include beef slew and rice. 

Saturday's special meals include beef 
liver, chopped steak, and potato 
dumplings. New for Saturday night is the 
roast duck and dressing with soup and 
salad, dessert and over 80 items on the 
smorgasbord. 

The lunch deals are spectacular. The 
early bird lunch special is $4.25 served 
with the famous 80-plus buffet, Tuesday 
through Friday from 11 a.m. to 11:30 
a.m. 

At regular luncheon hours from 1 1:30 
a.m. to 4 p.m. lunch including the buffet 
is $4.95. 

For soup and salad only during lunch it is 
$3.50. . 

The Warsaw Inn is taking reservations 
now for holiday parties, or just family get 
togethcrs for groups of between 10 and 
130. 

Carry-outs are available for any 
amount of people. Order by the pound or 
by the pint simply by calling (815) 344- 
0330. 




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jffieBtnurtmt 8c ^Banquet ^JfacilUitB 

Sunday Dinners 

Your 

hosts, 

BiU & Kris 

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(708) 223-0121 



Dinners start with our famous 
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spread, spiced apples and 2 sur- 
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entrees of seafood, beef, veal or 
poultry; a tossed salad or our 
spinach salad with warm vinegar 
dressing; choice of potatoes or 
vegetable, rolls and butter. 
PIUS 
Our Specials of the Day 
"""N include beverage and dessert 



Intersection 

Rte. 120 & 45, 

Grayslake, IL 

All major credit 

cards honored!. 




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Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakoland.Newspapert 31 



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GET "IT" OFF 

YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



LIPSERVICE 

IT r S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 22) 

You're welcome 

When Lipscrvicc first started I thought it was a great idea. 
But, now I think it is just a fake, a fake. You arc making up 
all of this. I have called several times but nothing has ever 
been printed. And, don't accuse mc of talking about 
something that someone else called about. Thanks for 
nothing. 

Happy or sad? 

Hi Lipscrvicc. You arc doing a good job. It is nice to see 
Grant's Pom Pom Squad article and a picture! How about 
the Pec-wee football from Round Lake Park? Come on 
guys. They ore doing a great job. Give them some 
coverage; 

Cart rental 

I am totally appalled that any grocery store in the area 
would have the nerve to charge $.25 to get a cart to Fill 
their baskets with food. This is a rental charge! I can't 
believe people in the area tolerate this!! 1 Get your act 
together people. 

Stop this 

In regard to "Still fighting," we do not fear you and never 
have. I already told your husband to touch mc and I would 
take care of him. If you remember, you were the one who 
shot the first bullet and started trouble with new neighbors 
in regards to the broken fence. You had to harp, and harp, 
and harp. You were the ones who started it and you know I 
am the one to finish it. 

Editorial note: Dear reader, normally we 
would not have even printed this note but this 
argument has gotten way out-of-hand. This war. 
of anonymous calls has got to stop! It is time 
for all of you to sit down and talk out your 
differences. Shame on all of you for fighting 
over a broken fence. We will not print any 
more of this bickering. 

No justice 

Why is it that if we do not wear our IDs or wear 
inappropriate clothing we can get sent home from Round 
Lake High School for a day. But, another student was 
caught with drugs in the cafeteria and he is back after a 
couple of days. Maybe the focus here should be on different 
things. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Fall choking season 

It is that time of the year again. I live in Wauconda 
Township and it is against the law to burn leaves, garbage, 
and waste. With the large turnover in home ownership, I 
think it would be a good idea for the fire department to . 
remind the homeowners. The next time my neighborhood 
is black with smoke, they will hear from me. 



Public speaking 

Who is Mary Jane Lucas? Is she a special education 
teacher? I sure would like to know. She spoke out at a 
Grayslake school board meeting. I would like to talk to her 
to respond to some of her nasty comments. 

Wants to help 

I read in your Lipscrv ice column that you have people 
without food and clothing. If there is any chance, con 
people let you know and I will coll back to help them with 
their food and clothing. I enjoy your Lipscrvicc and thank 
you very much. 

Mad taxpayer 

It did not take long for the foreigner to catch on. Antioch 
ACT scores are down and teacher's pay is up. Only in 
America can less work pay more. Education like this 
deserves more tax dollars. 



Clean but not shiny 



I would like to warn new car owners about certain car 
washes. I ran my new truck through one and ended up with 
scrapes and scratches. After talking with the owners and 
managers of the car wash, I submitted an insurance claim. 
The insurer told me that since no one else complained, they 
will not pay the claim. So, if this has happened to you, 
make sure you complain to the car wash owner. 



Needed some help 

I am a senior citizen. What has happened to the 
volunteers of the Grayslake Recycling Center? I am a little 
handicapped and there was no one to help mc. Mr. 
Lipscrvice could you Find out why the Waste Management 
docs not like the volunteers. 

Editorial note: Dear reader, we called the 
Village of Grayslake and they told us that the 
center is open from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on 
Saturdays and that there are usually volunteers 
there. Waste Management has nothing to do 
with the center except to pick up the materials. 
Hope this helps. 

Volunteering? 

I find it interesting that our Antioch newspaper features 
Vemon Holmes on the front page when it comes to any 
issues concerning the high school. Why do you use. 
Vemon instead of qualified people? 

Editorial note: Dear reader, Mr. Holmes is a 
representative of BEST and ar such generally 
has a differing viewpoint from the school 
board and officials. BEST, white unpopular 
with some people, still has a right to their 
opinions. In an effort to provide unbiased 
information, we try to include many points of 
view. Readers do have the right to hear both 
sides, don't you think? 

Good work 

I want to applaud the sophomores at Round Lake High 
School for helping out with the hallway decorations and 
the float building. You did a great job. 

Editorial note: Dear students at St. Peters, 
please address your concerns about specific 

(Continued on page 63) 



di—aaiHH na B wi HBiiBBifc. 
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Look for the FREE £ 
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Classifieds! 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 








THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



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held each FRIDAY AT 3:30 P.M., starting October 8th. 
PLEASE CALL OUR RENTAL OFFICE FOR DETAILS. 



708-587-8830 

3 Lilac • Fox Lake, IL 



f4ialHw*ig 



1)1 



32 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 



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1 



AMTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTRICT 
757 N. Main Street 
• AntiocK, IC 60002 





PuU-Ont 



PIG study identifies job trends 



Employment oppor- 
tunities in Lake County for 
people with limited post 
high school education 
will be best in three fields, 
according to a study sup- 
ported by the Private In- 
dustry Council of Lake 
County (PIC). 

That study, conducted 
by NCI Research, was 
completed in June, and 
identifies the industry 
sectors of health care, 
marketing/sales and 
manufacturing as having 
the most promising career 
fields for people to enter. 
Within the sectors of 
health care, the best op- 
portunities will exist for 
people trained as medical 
technicians or nurses, 
Those wishing to enter 
marketing/ sales will find 
positions for administra- 
tive assistants and cus- 



tomer service representa- 
tives. In the manufactur- 
ing sector, people trained 
as general production 
technicians or. mechanics, 
installers and repairers 
will be in demand. 

"This study is impor- 
tant to PIC because it 
helps board members 
identify where training 
dollars-will be best spent," 
said Chris Stevens, PIC's 
executive director. 

For the past 10 years, 
PIC has assisted thou- 
sands of Lake County resi- 
dents who needed job 
training and placement 
assistance. The organiza- 
tion focuses on short term 
vocational training, and 
helps people identify ca- 
reer fields which are best 
for them, then acquire the 
skills needed to enter that 
field. 



j"The study indicates 
clearly that career oppor- 
tunities exist for people 
who, for whatever reason, 
do not wish to attend or 
cannot complete four 
years of college," Stevens 
said. 

"That doesn't mean 
education and training 
are not necessary," she 
added. 

"Entry level jobs have 
and will continue to re- 
quire at least a high 
school diploma, and 
many of those jobs will 
demand some type of 
specialized training." 

The NCI research re- 
veals that health care 
technicians, including li- 
censed practical and reg- 
istered nurses, adminis- 
trative support personnel 
including assistants and 
customer service experts, 



and general produc- 
tion/assembly workers, 
quality inspectors and 
people with industrial 
maintenance skills will all 
be in demand in Lake 
County. 

As part of the study, 
NCI researchers met with 
representatives from all 
three major fields and 
talked with them during 
focus group sessions. "Re- 
actions from those repre- 
sentatives indicate that 
employers are placing 
high value on personal 
qualities like self-esteem, 
responsibility and the 
ability to learn," Stevens 
said. 

Because many workers 
handle a variety of tasks, 
problem solving ability, 
team playing and the 
ability to work with a cul- 



turally diverse workforce 
are all important to an 
individual's career. 

"I know council mem- 
bers as well as employers 
will be interested in the 
study and its results," 
Stevens said. 

"Although PIC has 
kept up with changing 
workforce needs, this in- 
formation will allow us to 
hone the design of pro- 
grams already in place." 

Copies of the NCI 
study are available to 

those interested by calling 
PIC at 249-2200, ext. 13, 

NCI Research is part of 
the Kellog Graduate 
School of Management in 
Evanston. The Private In- 
dustry Council of Lake 
County is the local admin- 
istrator of Job Training 
Partnership Act funds. 



Vocational center prepares students for jobs 



Preparing students to 
meet the Job market 
needs of the future is one 
of the goals of the Lake 
County Area Vocational 
Center which stresses tech 
preparation In -its 
curriculum. 

Junior and senior high 
school students from 
schools throughout the 
county and portions of 
McHcnry County attend 
the vocational programs 
offered at the school. 

"Today, vocational 
education helps prepare 
students for a career in a 
technical field," said 
Linda Helton, director of 
the school. "In a tech 
prep program students 
arc advised to take two 
years of technical educa- 
tion at the high school 
level, two years at the, 



community college or 
technical level and then 
proceed to a four-year 
college for an additional 
two years. Vocational 
Education has changed its 
focus from the stigma of 
being a program that 
simply attempts to pro- 
vides students with skills 
to meet obtain a job fol- 
lowing graduation." 

A range . of programs 
are offered at the school 
including: office technol- 
ogy, data processing, 
computer aided drafting, 
graphic design, auto body 
and auto services, small 
engine, electronics, food 
service, building trades, 
child care, cosmetology, 
horticulture, heating and 
air conditioning, welding, 
media design and 
production and health 



care. Included in the 
program Is a full-time 
preschool where students 
gain work experience . 
Additionally, building 
trades students actually 
construct a home in the 
county. 

"We are the first vo- 
cational center in the state 
to receive federal funding 
for an apprentice 
machine shop program 
for high school students," 
said Helton. 

The vocational center 
has existed alongside the 
College of Lake County for 
more than 20 years and 
during that time It has 
cultivated relationships 
with business and 
Industry to develop pro- 
grams that provide skilled 
workers with available 
jobs. 



"Our programs are In 
coordination with CLC so 
that when a student fin- 
ishes the course here, he 
or she can continue on in 
the' same program at the 
college, " said Helton. 

Several standing 
committees work with 
business and industry 
leaders on a regular basis 
to ensure students are 
learning the skills needed 
to keep students current 
and that our equipment 
needs are current. Among 
those programs is the 
Work Force 2000. 

"Projections are that 
75 percent of future jobs 
will come from technical 
areas in which we have 
the potential to train 
students," Helton said. 

The current enroll- 
ment at the vocational 



center Is 1,100. 
"Vocational education is 
on an upward growth 
track at this time," said 
Helton. "I think we will 
see even more new pro- 
grams In the future." 

The vocational center 
will be hosting a world 
class work force confer- 
ence this fall which will 
work to renew partner- 
ships with area corpora- 
tions. 

"We are hoping to 
renew relationships with 
area businesses and 
corporations In the area," 
said Helton. "Lake 
County business and 
industry are wonderfully 
supportive of education. 
We are very fortunate for 
that support" 
— by Rhonda Vlnzant 



Liikelaiid 










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Fall 1993 



The Great Lakes Credit Union has 135 employees serving 80,000 mem- 
bers with over $200 Million in Assets. We have a number of employment 
opportunities available: Accounting Specialist, Phone Representative, 
Full-Time and Part-Time Tellers, Financial Services Representative, 
Compliance Technician, Administrative Assistant, and New Accounts 
Representative. Please apply in person, or send or fax your resume and 
cover letter with salary history to the address below and indicate for 
which position you are applying. No telephone calls nlense. We offer a 
friendly, professional work environment as well as a competitive salary, 
incentive, and benefit package. Salary is based on experience and qualifi- 
cations. Our benefits include Group Insurance Plans, Paid Vacation, and 
a Pension Plan. 

GREAT LAKES CREDIT UNION 

2525 GREEN BAY ROAD 

NORTH CHICAGO, IL 60064 

ATTN: HUMAN RESOURCES DEPT. 

FAX: (708) 578-7016 

E.O.E./SMOKE FREE ENVIRONMENT 




ACCURATE INFORM SYSTEMS 

(708) 244-2511 or 1-800-868-HELP 

PERMANENT FULL TIME EMPLOYMENT 




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We list employment openings flee for employers. 
Over 500 jobs open for immediate hire 
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♦PAINTERS 

♦PRINTING 

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♦SECRETARIAL 

^TELEMARKETING 

♦TRUCKING 

♦WORD PROCESSING 



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Manpower 

by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Manpower Services, a major 
temporary service employer in Lake 
County, predicts employment 
reductions to overtake hiring gains this 
fall in Lake County, based on its poll of 
companies' staffing plans for the fourth 
quarter of 1993. 

"Of the local executives questioned 
about workforce options for October, 
November and December, 10 percent 
say they will increase personnel while 
13 percent forecast fewer workers by 
year-end," said Chuck Bartels of 
Manpower. "Additionally, 74 percent 
expect to maintain current levels and 
three percent have not yet decided." 

Bartels added that while holiday- 
related hiring leads during the fourth 
quarter, other sectors experience an 




employment drop-off,-during the final 
quarter. 

Present plans, according to Bartels, 
are far less promising than even last 
quarter, when 33 percent of those 
polled intended to create more jobs 
and 10 percent envisioned cutbacks. 
Last year at this time, employers were a 
little more optimistic with their growth 
plans as 20 percent predicted labor 
gains while 13 percent sought to reduce 
staff size. 

Bartels predicts the best 
opportunities for employment this fall 
will be in the services industry, while 
staff reductions are expected in 
wholesale/retail trade and education. 
Mixed readings are reported, according 
to Bartels, in durable goods and 
manufacturing jobs. 





s economic 



development 




The goal of the College of Lake 
County Economic Development 
Office Is to bring business and in- 
dustry to Lake County and to assist 
those organizations with training 
their employees and finding quali- 
fied employees In the area. 

"We interface with Industry and 
businesses on a variety of levels," 
said Tim Budd, Associate Dean for 
Economic Development at CLC. 
"We have a small business devel- 
opment center, procurement center 
and a business and industry trade 
center that have been established 
here." 



Budd's role Is to assist businesses 
In any way he can in establishing 
and maintaining a solid economic 
base In Lake County. 

"Lake County Is a growing area 
for businesses and it will continue 
to be so," said Budd. "My gut feel- 
ing right now is that the field Is flat 
to improving at this time and will 
continue to improve." 

Budd says the biggest growing 
areas have been the service Industry 
and manufacturing.— by Rhonda 
Vinzant 



HEALTH CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Bring your talents and expertise to our dynamic progressive 
team. St. Catherine's Hospital invites you to consider our 
open positions for the following professionals: 

•Financial Analyst 
•Medical Transcriptionist 
•Medical Technologists 



•Physical Therapists 
•Respiratory Therapists 
•Registered Nurses 



Our location offers lakeside living equally distanced between 
Milwaukee and Chicago. St. Catherine's offers excellent 
salaries along with a comprehensive benefits package (includ- 
ing sign on bonuses for some positions). For more information, 
send resume or contact our Human Resources department 

(414)656-3395 

Jk SI CATHERINE'S 
^j§£ HOSPITAL 

W§ 355 6 Seventh Ave, Kenosha , Wl 53140 
Caring for Generations 



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Personnel Plus 
matches good peo- 
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good jobs to good 
people. We test to 
match your abilities 
to our job opportu- 
nities. Success... for 
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forward to your 
call or visit. 



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OPPORTUNITY 



At the Private Industry Council of Lake County, the 
word Opportunity represents more than an idea. It is the 
product PIC offers to Lake County's residents and 
businesses. 

PIC offers a number of employment services to Lake 
County residents, and offers personnel services to Lake 
County businesses. 

By working in partnership with businesses, The Private 
Industry Council of Lake County provides opportunities 
for both the businesses and workers in Lake County. 

"Equal Opportunity Employer Programs" 
"Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to 

individuals with disabilities" 



Applicant Recruitment 
Screening and Referral 
Aptitude/Skill Testing 
Customized training programs 
On-the-Job Training 
Recruitment and Screening 
Job analysis and job 

descriptions 
Coaching and counseling of 
• new employees 
Tax credit information 



Career Counseling 

Resume development and 

typesetting 

Job search and placement 

assistance 

Paid tuition to 

The College of Lake County 

Lake County Area 

Vocational Center 

Short Term Skill Schools 
Paid on-the-job training 
Counseling and coaching 



Services are offered at no cost to qualified 
businesses and individuals 

Call PIC at C708) 249-2200 

TDD (708) 249-2200, ext. 14 



The Private Industry Council oS Lake County 

• 415 Washington St. Waukegan, IL 60085 

Se Habla Espafiol >8i-HgsS5SKte5ES 



t 
r 



? 



2B Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 



■"* ' * "~~*i±1S»ttir\!ii umip 



■ ■ . .. j. . . '. - ■ ': '••!>--/; *. 



-y--.T-^^* M 








If your qualifications are not exem- 
plary and you have some troubled 
spots on your resume, don't worry. The 
employer may need an explanation, 
additional information or a new inter- 
pretation if you have something in your 
employment history which is negative 
or is the kind of thing frowned on by 
employers. 

It's up to you to provide a positive 
explanation, either in response to a 
question or your own initiative. 

The following is a list of "negatives" 
which can be turned into positives. 
Job hopping 

Employer: "It seems that you have 
problems holding onto a job, Mr. X. 
Why do you change jobs so often?" 

Possible solution: "Mr. Employer, 
it's true that I have held a lot of jobs. I 
tried a variety of things and learned 
what I like to do and what I can do well. 
I assure you that if you give me the 
chance to work for your company, you 
will have a stable, dependable em- 
ployee. It's time that I settled down." 

Notice that you can agree you were a 
job-hopper, but then turn it around to 
your advantage. Also, you can be reas- 
suring giat you will stay with this em- 
ployer. 
Firing 

Employer: "Why were you fired 



from your last job, Mr. X?" 

Possible solution: "To be honest, I 
was at fault. I was unhappy with the job, 
didn't take an interest in it, missed a lot 
of time. I realize I was wrong and would 
never be that unfair to my employer 
again. I've learned from my mistake." 

Possible solution: "To be honest, it 
was a different situation. I'm sure my 
employer had sincere and good rea- 
sons for firing me. He felt that I was out 
sick too often and perhaps he was right. 
However, before last winter, I have al- 
ways had a good attendance record 
and I'm confident that this will not be a 
problem in the future." 

Note that you can just admit to be- 
ing fired. Own up to the reasons and 
reassure the employer that it won't 
happen again. Often, people get de- 
fensive about being fired, but it's better 
to admit you may have been at fault. 
Older worker 

Employer; (This might be a hidden 
agenda item which the employer will 
not bring up in an interview. It's a good 
idea to introduce the topic yourself). 

Possible solution: "There is some- 
thing I'd like to discuss with you, Mr. 
Employer. As someone who has 
worked for 25 years as a secretary and 
office worker, I feel that I have experi- 
ence, stability and perspective to offer 
your company. I hope that you will 
value a long record of achievement and 
performance such as mine." 
No work experience 

Employer: "Since you just gradu- 
ated from school, you have no work ex- 
perience. Why should I hire you?" 

Possible solution: "It's true that I 
have no experience at this kind of work. 
What I do have is energy, initiative, 
motivation and I'm willing to learn. 
Give me a chance to show what I can do 
for you." 



CARE 





SUM 




Trudy Hellios 

855 S. Rand Rd. • Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-4372 

•Complete Resume Service 

• Human Resource Degree 

• Cover Letters, etc. 

• Laser Printing 

Take Control of Your Career! 



CHOOSE KELLY 



for a variety of opportunities: 

• Office Clerical 'Marketing • Light Industrial •Technical 

Our employees enjoy many benefits. 

• Great pay »Long and short term 
•Flexible schedules assignments 

Call today! 

(708)3674144 

Thanks to all Kelly employees 
for their valuable contributions 




National Temporary Help Week 
October 3-9, 1993 



1/TI IV Te " 1 P° ra, V 
BVlLL/ Services 

©1993 Kelly Services, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Employer. Never A fee. 



We won't camouflage this great 
faU opportunity. 




Jobs like these just don't come 
around too often. We're hiring 
full and part-time people to 
help us sell and distribute our 
terrific lines of hunting, fishing 
and camping equipment, and 
we offer the kinds of pay and schedul- 
ing that make life outside of work all 
the more worthwhile. See if we can tai- 
lor a schedule that fits your busy life- 
style! Openings include: 

Telephone Sales Reps 

Work full or part-time, day, evening or night. A pleasant phone manner, 
friendly personality and basic typing/keyboard skills are all you need. 

Warehouse Personnel 

Returns Clerk - Full-time, first shift Typing of 40-50 wpm. Must be able 
tolift501bs. 

Pickers, Packers - Pull-time, day shifts or 'part-time, evening shifts from 
4 pm-8 pm or 5 pm-9 pm are available. Perfect for anyone with free evening 
hours or anyone looking for a second income. 

Retail 

Full or part-time, day, evening and weekend shifts available. 
Cashiers - Retail cashiering experience a plus. 
Sales Associates - Familiarity with hunting, fishing or archery is helpful. 
Our team members enjoy: 



i 



• Raid holidays 

• Paid training 



• Good pay & incentives 

• 20% merchandise discounts 



Interested? Come by our personnel office, and we'll fill you in on all the 
details. The office is open Monday-Friday, 7 am-5 pm and Saturday, 
8 am-12 noon at P.O. Box 128, Hwy. W, Wilmot, WI 53192. 



Equal Opportunity Employer WF/IW 
"A fantastic place to work and Bve" 



I 



i 



W 



For a career opportunity, 
become a member of our 




We 
Offer 



We are locally owned and dedicated 
to supporting our communities 

•6 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS* 

►A pleasant working atmosphere 
►Competieive wages 
►Opportunity for advancement 
•Full time & part time hours 
to suit your needs 

FULL TIME BENEFITS INCLUDE: 

•Holiday Pay •Medical Insurance 

•Life Insurance •Paid Vacation 

•Profit Sharing •Employee Discount 

Apply in person at any of our locations... 

jfflsE Hardware 



\ 



■t* 



ROUND LAKE 



Route 134 
(708) 546-4668 



libertyville 



Route 21 & 137 
(708) 362-3340 



ROUND LAKE BEACH I - MUNDELEIN 



Route 83 & Rollins 
(708) 223-0190 



609 E. Hawley 
(708)566-1100 



GURNEE 



Grand Ave. & Rt. 21 
(708)336-0101 



LAKEHURST 



Route 120, Waukegan 
(708) 473-0320 



Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 3B 



.,1 .1— • *k*l -— 



i*l— eJA3- »,'«. r. 



Job hunting: Turning 




into success 



For millions of Americans, the task 
of conducting a job search produces 
little more than frustration, anger, 
humiliation, rejection and personal 
defeat. In working with thousands of 
job seekers, most individuals will place 
job hunting close to the top of their list 
of things they fear most in life, just after 
death, serious illness or injury, finan- 
cial ruin and divorce. It is not surpris- 
ing then to find that the suicide rate 
among the unemployed is higher than 
among the employed group. 

There is no question that the pro- 
cess of finding employment, for many 
people, is a difficult task incumbent 
with a high rate of personal pain and 
failure. Knowing this, countless num- 
bers of employment placement agen- 
cies have sprung up across the nation 
to supposedly relieve people of this 
burden. 



Are you then doomed to face this 
terrible situation alone? Is the task of 
hunting for employment one which 
you should simply understand and ac- 
cept is filled with pain and suffering? Is 
job hunting one of life's bitter mo- 
ments? 

No, not if approached intelligently 
from an informed perspective. Specifi- 
cally, not if you acquire and use effec- 
tive job seeking strategies and skills. 

The process is akin to watching two 
individuals who each speak a different 
language trying to talk to each other. 
Their intentions may be good, but be- 
cause of their inability to understand 
each other, the outcome is predictable. 
Many people simply do not under- 
stand the needs of employers and 
therefore, fail to communicate the very 
information which employers require 
when selecting employees. 



The process of seeking employ- 
ment is a task, a task which can be 
learned and mastered just like any 
other task in life. Unfortunately, few 
people take the time to learn how to 
successfully seek employment. 

The bottom line then is simple — if 
you are willing to learn several effective 
job seeking strategies and skills, you 
can decrease your pain and failure and 
increase your success. 

It is surprising how many people 
use the same old failure-ridden strategy 
for seeking employment. Once the 
decision has been made that a job is 
needed, most people will prepare a re- 
sume and cover letter (which is their 
way of announcing to the world that 
they are available) and then start look- 
ing for any individual or company 
where they can forward this informa- 
tion. _ 



This process, often referred to as the 
n shot gun" approach, requires that you 
send out dozens, if not several hun- 
dred, letters and resumes. 

Now you would think that after 
sending out hundreds of letters and re- 
sumes, and after making countless 
numbers of phone calls, that you would 
be offered, several positions. Well, the 
truth of the matter is just the opposite. 
It's no longer a surprise to hear from 
people who followed this strategy that 
they received maybe one or two re- 
sponses and even these were not ex- 
actly what they wanted. 

After completing such a seemingly 
thorough job of seeking, employment 
and after getting such a poor response, 
the conclusion that most people draw 
from this experience is "there are no 

(Continued on page 5b) 



. 




I 



... 
iv 

i 



< <■ 



:■",)■ 







Now hiring manager trainees for 
5 locations in Lake County 

a You must have your own transportation and be able to 

work both day and night shifts. Previous management 

experience a plus, but not required. Company is growing, 

so advancement opportunities are available. Gall John at 

815-356-9779, Ext. 1 16 and leave message. 



CAREER SEARCH 

QUICKLY 

AND 

CONFIDENTIALLY 

ACCESS is on the cutting edge of putting 

qualified professionals together with job openings. 

Save time and money with this hi-tech and inexpensive 

approach to job search. We will match your needs 

confidentially and without contingency fees to the 

entire Chicago market. 

All you need to do is send us your resume and \ 
ACCESS matches your qualifications with job openings 
throughout Chicago every day. ACCESS scans- 
resumes and databases your profile information for 
quick retrieval by employers. 
Call: 

(708)294-0700 

or send resume to: 




LINKING CAREERS AND COMPANIES 

2720 River Road, Ste. 213 
Des Plaines, IL 60018-4111 




We can open 
doors for you. 

Working as a Manpower Temporary means lots of new 
opportunities. We offer FREE word processing training. You 
can upgrade your skills or learn new ones. New skills that 
can open lots of doors career-wise. 

We have immediate assignments available at top local 
businesses. You'll get lots of opportunities to perfect your 
new skills. To earn great pay and fringe benefits. And to 
build your resume. 

Don't pass up an opportunity like this. Call today. 

©MANPOWER* 



TEMPORARY SERVICES 



Vernon Hills 
(708)918-1300 

Wauconda 
(708) 526-4300 



Waukegan 
(708) 473-4306 

McHenry 
(815)385-6600 



EOE 



Healthcare and Technician 
(708) 473-4300 



M/F/H 



Lagniappe Restaurants, Inc. 
A Franchise of Wendy's 

is now Hiring 

due to growth 

in the Lake 

County area. 

We offer: 



l 



OLD FASHIONED 

HAMBURGERS 



• Competitive Salary/Benefits/Bonuses 

• Paid Vacations • Comprehensive Training 

• 5 day work week • Advancement Potential 

FOR AIX LEVELS OF 

MANAGEMENT 

We are seeking enthusiastic self-starters 

to join our team. Need not be experienced 

in the restaurant industry. 

FULL & PART TIME 
CREW POSITIONS 

Now available at these locations 

Vernon Hills • Waukegan (Lewis) 

North Chicago • Highland Park • Zion 

For Information & directions call 

C708) 487-: 

EOE 



m 
m 



4B Lakoland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 







■it. I. 



— r-~ . - - 



;iuvi^«^u^«iaAii«MiannttMW4nuBnMVM4HIBMS3 





JNTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISTINCT 

757 N. Main Street 
Antioch , li: 6fKlb2 - 



(Continued from page 4b) 

. jobs out there for me." This conclusion 
often turns into panic and depression. 
At this point most people become des- 
perate and will' accept just about any 
job, rather than getting the one they 
really want. 

Unfortunately (or fortunately, if you 
own or work for an employment 
placement; agency), this is the time 
when many frustrated and defeated job 
seekers will seek help from profes- 
sional services and will be willing to 
pay "big bucks" for them to do what 
they believe they cannot do for them- 
selves. In addition to using placement 
agencies, other resources are often 
used, such as career planning 'and 
placement services on college cam- 
puses, the Dept. of Employment Secu- 
rity, classified help wanted ads in 
newspapers, computerized job banks, 
labor and trade unions, professional 
organizations and. private head hunt- 
ing firms. 

In spite of the combined resources 
and efforts of the above, research 
clearly reveals that none of the above 
resources is usually more successful 
than 20 percent of the time. That 
means that for every 100 people who 
use these resources, 20 or less actually 
secure employment from this assis- 
tance. If you're part of the 80 percent 
group who does not find them useful, 
where do you then go when all re- 
sources have failed? 

That's the bad news. Here's the 
good news.- The same research studies 
also indicate that the best way of secur- 
ing employment is to seek out employ- 
ers directly by yourself. That is, put 
most of your time and energy into 
contacting employers who have a need 
for you. 

But there's a catch. Don't use the 
"shot gun" approach and send your re- 
sume and cover letter to every company 
you think may hire you. That approach 
will not work well for you. Here's a 
three step strategy you should adopt 
which has demonstrated over the years 
to produce more fob offers and better 



J^b offers than the conventional strat- 
egy- 
Step No. 1 — Determine your career 
objective. 

Before you even start the process of 
job hunting, know what kind of job you 
want to find. If you do not know what 
you're looking for, how will you know 
where to look for it, and how will em- 
ployers know what you can do for 
them? 

Do not go into the job market with a 
vague or general idea of what kind of 
position you want. Many people falsely 
believe that their odds will be im- 
proved if they. do not indicate a specific 
career objective on their resume, in 
their cover letters, or in conversations 
with company representatives. The 
more general they are; the more posi- 
tions they believe will be offered. This 
is a fatal mistake. Do not ask the em- 
ployer to determine what kind of posi- 
tion you should be offered. If you are 
unclear in your objective, the employer 
will be unsure of your value, and you 
will simply be passed over in most sit- 
uations. 

If you are, unsure of a career direc- 
tion, seek out professional career guid- 
ance before you start your job search. 
Know what talent (knowledge and 
skills) you possess, and which occupa- 
tions typically require your talent. 

Step No. 2— Determine who needs 
you. 

Depending upon your talent, your 
next job is to identify those employers 
who have a need for your assistance, 

Specifically, you need to identify 
employers who typically hire the kind 
of position you would, like to secure. 
There are many ways to identify poten- 
tial employers, too many to go into de- 
tail in this article. However, the com- 
mercial bookstores are loaded with 
books on how to find potential em- 
ployers. 

Don't worry whether or not these 
employers have any current employ- 
ment openings. Most job openings are 
never advertised. Therefore, if you only 
seek those with advertised positions, 



SHOOT 

FOR THE INNER CIRCLE 



TARGET 





Target Greatland in Vernon Hills is already a substantial 
player in Chicagoland's retail scene. But we're not slowing 
down. We're going to increase our circle of excellence to 
extend even further throughout Chicagoland. This means 
even more entry-level and supervisory opportunities for 
you, To find out how you can be a part of TARGET'S inner 
circle of excellence apply a t 

TARGET GREATLAND 

313 E. Townline Rd. 

Vernon Hills, II 60061 

(708)680-0390 



Mon.-Saf. 8 am - 9:30 pm Sun. 9 am 

EOE DRUG FREE 



- 7 pm 



L 



KEY HOURLY 
SUPERVISORS 

^Supervisory Experience Preferred 
'Wages Start at $7.0Q/hr, 
'Comprehensive Benefit Package 
'Opportunities for Advancement 



Permanent & 
Temporary Positions 

•Cashier •Clerical 

•Sales Floor 'Food Ave, 

•Overnight Stockers 
•6:00 A.M. Price Change Team 



you'll be looking at only a fraction of. 
the real market. Plus, if you identify an 
employer at the time an advertisement 
for employment has occurred, you will 
be contacting the employer at the very 
time when the competition will be the 
keenest. You want to get to the em- 
ployer before he or she places a public 
notice for help. This strategy is referred 
to as finding the "hidden" job market 

Don't concentrate solely on just 
those employers who have publicly 
stated that they have an employment 
position available. 

Once you have identified a list of 
potential employers, eliminate those 
on your list who represent the least at- 
tractive opportunities. 

Note: This is the point at which 
most job seekers will send out their re- 
sumes and cover letters. Because they 
fail to complete the next step, they are 



often unable to offer employers the 
land of information which is necessary 
for an employer to conclude that you 
are the right one for the job. 

Step No. 3 — Determine why the 
employer needs you. 

Understand that for the vast major- 
ity of employers, the decision to hire 
someone comes down to one simple 
point. A person is hired because he or 
she is seen as the person best suited to 
help the employer reach his or her 
business goals. This connection be- 
tween the employer's need and your 
talent is critical to your job seeking suc- 
cess. Understand the connection and 
you can succeed; fail to realize how you 
can help an employer and your appli- 
cation for employment will usually be 
rejected. 



>>.'; 



!i 






J 



- * 





The Word is Out...Olsten is the Place To Be!! 

ur temporaries tell us it's our interesting assignments, to 
vacation pay, flexible hours and benefits that make 



Our temporaries tell us it's our interesting assignments, top pay rate, 
vacation pay, flexible hours and benefits that make Olsten so 
popular. Olsten places thousands of temporaries on job assignments 



in over 300 skill categories 

• Clerical • Receptionist/Switchboard 

• Word Processing 



mm 

Staffing Services 

Eqiul Opportunity Employer M/F 



Technical 
Data Entry • Light Industrial 

Visit us at our Job Fair Wednesday, 
Oct. 6th, 3-7pm at: Hilltop Executive 
Center, 1580 S. Milwaukee Ave., 
2nd Floor, Libertyville. 

Orull 708/816*8707 for more information. 



'•"gPC-N 



•••••••••••*•••••••*•••• 







As an Advertising and ^ -=^*^ 

Public Relations Professional in Your Community 

A high-earning, prestigious opportunity awaits you as a WELCOME WAGON Rep- 
resentative in this area. Meet exciting people. Become acquainted with influential 
government and business leaders. Enjoy high earnings as you manage your own 
flexible 40-hour week. Represent local businesses and professionals when you call on 
new U.S. citizens, engaged women, new parents, and movers. 

For a personal interview, contact Maria (708) 577-3637 

WELCOME WAGON® 

INTERNATIONAL, INC. 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

•••••••••*••*•*•*••••••• 



Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 5B 



' I 111 



'--!" 






■I 
ll' 



I 




Now Hiring to fill positions at 
the following locations: 
118 W. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach 
338 Route 173, Antioch 
20 S. Route 12, Fox Lake 
Gurnee Mills Mall, Gurnee 

Hours can flex around school schedules. Day and night hours available. 
Apply in person at the above locations after 2 p.m..M~F. 



This is what bosses are looking for 



When you're going to an interview, 
you've got to be at the top of your game. 
There are eight factors you should re- 
member when being interviewed. This 
is what the boss or interviewer wili be 
looking for. ' 

• Appearance— Is the general ap- 
pearance favorable? This includes ev- 
erything from stature, posture, personal 
hygiene and neatness. 

• Personality— To what degree is 
the applicant's personality likable? 
This includes friendliness, maturity, in- 
terests, self-confidence, manners and 
overall communication in verbal re- 
sponses and silent body language. 

• Experience — Does the applicant 
have any background or experience 
which would enhance his ability to 
perform well in the job in question? 
Does experience prove a history of job 
stability and career progress? Other 
considerations: Attendance, punctual- 
ity, dependability, trustworthiness. 

• Education— Is the applicant's ed- 



ucation related to and adequate for the 
job in question? Will additional train- 
ing be necessary? Is. academic record 
satisfactory or even above average? 

• Potential— Does applicant give 
evidence of ability to succeed and show 
initiative in the position in question? 
This will include a discussion of per - 

» sonal goals and career objectives. Are 
the applicant's skills transferable? 

• Conversation — Can "applicant ad- 
equately express himself? This will in- 
clude, an analysis of voice quality, ap- 
propriateness of responses and quan- 
tity of responses. 

• Enthusiasm— Does applicant 
show a sincere interest in the position 
and enthusiasm for the career field? Is 
the applicant willing to make some 
sacrifices for improved business per- 
formance? 

• Reasoning and judgment — Does 
the applicant show alert, logical rea- 
soning and sound judgment? 



I 



Experience Counts. 

Administrative Assistants 

Executive Secretaries • Receptionists 

Word Processors • Data Entry 

Your experience can earn you top dollars on challenging . 
short & long-term assignments with the BEST companiesl 

Don't delay, call today! EOE 

One Northbrook Place 

5 Revere Drive, #370 

Northbrook, IL 60062 

708-480-2073 Fax: 480-1871 



42 Learn about company before applying 



OFFICE 




A Division of Robert Hall International, Inc. 
^/The nation's fastest-growing starting service for quality administrative support 
Ln 



"h 

tf 



Nursing 




Committed To Our 
Community 



Midwestern Regional Medical Center Is 

committed to providing our community with 
compassionate and high quality care within 
our new, state-of-the-art 95 bed medical 
facility. We Invite you to Join our team of 
dedicated professionals In an environment 
that promotes and encourages personal 
Involvement while satisfying career needs 
and goals. We currently have the following 
opportunities: 




WM 



Minimum 2 years hospital experience. 




Minimum 1 year hospital and/or long term care experience. 

Other Medical Opportunities Available 

Our benefit package is designed to recognize and reward the 
contributions of our staff. Along with the most competitive rates ln Lake 
County, we offer medical/dental/life, paid vacations/holidays, tuition 
reimbursement and more! To schedule an interview, please stop In for an 
application or send resume: 

Human Resources 

1616 23rd. Street 

Zion, IL 60099 

Midwestern Regional 

Medical Center 

Tomorrow's hospital is here today. 



MidwesternW 



IIOIOMU MIDICAL CUTtl 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



The first step" in-preparing for your 
job interview should be researching the 
company. This should be completed 
prior to applying since one never 
knows when the interview will take 
place. 

Knowing the answers in advance to 
the following questions should help 
you prepare pertinent questions to ask 
the prospective employers. It also will 
show the employer that you are in- 
formed about and interested in the 
company. 

Key research questions: 

• What does the company do? 

• How old is the company? 

• What industries does it serve? 

• What product/ services does it 
provide? 

• How large is the company? 

• Does the company have a good 
reputation? 

• Why is this job open? 

• What is the policy for advance- 
ment? 



The answers to these questions 
should help you formulate a clearer 
idea of what your future might be with 
this particular company. It should also 
help you to answer the critical question 
of "Why do you want to work here?" 
Sources of Information 

Local Chamber of Commerce: The 
Chamber, will have information con- 
cerning most companies and busi- 
nesses in the area. 

Library: The librarian can help with 
resources for information on company 
background, such as manufacturing 
directories or sources on Fortune 500 
companies. 

Call the company: Another source 
of information is to call the company 
and ask for printed information, if 
available. 

Talk to someone who has worked at 
the company: That person may be able 
to providesome valuable background 
information. Be sure your sources are 
reliable. 



••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

r ieiy s 

J Levy Security Consultants, Chicago's premier security com- J 
^ pany, is currently recruiting the industry's finest. You've ^ 

* learned discipline and leadership, and understand the impor- * 
-k tance of a structured security organization. If you are looking * 

* for a career, possess outstanding communication skills and * 
J are in excellent physical condition, we would like to discuss -J 
^ our opportunities with you. ^ 

* * 

<£ We operate Public Safety Departments in the North and i 

* Northwest Suburbs for Glenbrook Hospital, EHS Good* 

* "Shepherd Hospital and Evanston Hospital, Lake Barrington * 



• 



Shores, Wynstone, Royal Melbourne, Mission Hills and One J 
J. Schaumburg Place. In addition, we have career opportunities J 
•A- at Marshall. Fields, Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the * 

* John Hancock Center. * 

* • 

* If you are looking to join a team that plays a vital role in the * 

* safety and protection of hospitals, retail, commercial and resi- * 



• 

• 

• 
• 



dehtial properties, we offer: 

•A Management Training Program 
. •Competitive Starting Salary and Benefits 
•Outstanding Advancement Opportunities 



• 
• 
• 

• 



£ Previous security, law enforcement or military experience is ^ 

• 

• 

• 
• 

••*••••*••••••**••*•*••••••**•• 



* preferred. 
• 

* Apply in person or send resume to: 

• 
• 
• 



Levy Security Consultants Limited 

230 East Ohio Street, 7th Floor 

Chicago, IL 60611 

(312)649-9204 



] 



J 



\IU 



6B Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1 , 1993 



,„-;.■ 



■ 



rt 






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Resumes: Saying only 
what you need to say 




The four most commonly used re- 
sume styles are described below, 

(1) Chronological— This style (the 
most common and traditional) incor- 
porates a listing of the job seeker's work 
history starting with the most current 
position and working back in time. 
Each job is described in terms of a tide, 
dates of employment, employer's 
name and a description of the duties 
and accomplishments. No mention of 
a specific job objective is recom- 
mended with this style. 

This resume style is recommended 
if you have a solid work history with no 
gaps in time, if the job you want is di- 
rectly related to your work history, or if 
you have worked for a well known 
company and you want to use the 
company's name to bolster your pro- 
fessional image and reputation. 

(2) "Functional— This more contem- 
porary style incorporates a listing of the 
job seeker's major areas of knowledge 
or accomplishments, usually arranged 
in priority from the most developed 
skills to the least developed skills. 
(Note: You may also arrange your skills 
in any order to best support whatever 
position you are seeking). Job titles, 
names of employers, dates of employ- 
ment and a description of duties are 
usually left out when this style is used. 
Like the Chronological style above, no 
mention of a specific job objective is 
recommended with this style. 



This resume style is recommended 
if you are making a career change and 
are attempting to secure a position very 
different from your past work history. 
This style is also useful if you are seek- 
ing your first job (you have no work 
history), or when you are re-entering 
the job market and you have gaps of 
time when you did not work. 

(3) Targeted— This style incorpo- 
rates information found in both of the 
styles listed above — information about 
your work history and major areas of 
skills and knowledge. The main differ- 
ence with a targeted resume is that you 
DO mention the title of the position 
you are seeking, and then list those 
skills and accomplishments you have 
had and relevant work experience 
which are related to your job objective. 
In short, the whole resume is geared or 
focused at one specific job (target). 

This resume style is recommended 
when you are confident in your job ob- 
jective and have related knowledge, 
skills and experience to support your 
objective. 

(4) Alternative— This style (in the 
form of a business letter) requires that 
you first research the company(ies) you 
would like to work for to learn what 
their business objectives are and what 
they need in terms of talent, and then 
prepare a letter describing how you 
(with that same talent) can be of help to 
them. 

While this style requires more work 
(i.e. the research) than the other styles, 
it can offer certain individuals with 
limitations (i.e. those people with work 
gaps, no work experience, etc.) an op- 
portunity to be seen as talented and 
valuable. This style has also been used 
very successfully by individuals who 
could use one of the three styles listed 
above, but who wanted to demonstrate 
a uniqueness and willingness to focus 
in on the employer's needs. 



THE RESIDENT IS AT THE HEART OF ALL WE DO! 




mi 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 

Mount Saint Joseph is an intermediate care facility for developmental^ 
disabled women age 21 and over. The facility Is operated by the Daughters 
of St. Mary of Providence, who are dedicated to providing physical, mental, 
emotional and spiritual care to mentally retarded women. 
Our aim is to support each resident and challenge her to live her life to the 
fullest extent possible within the environment that provides her the free- 
dom to develop all that her potential allows, while promoting her dignity as 
a human being. 



■'■ .■ *"» * ■; ■>" WVXW ' 



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:o,i* v>y-Kj*A "■'-< ». -k-:< :.-. I 



MEDICAL OPPORTUNITIES 



- t- - ' ■ — " ! -■* • — — ' — — ' - ' 



Immediate 
openings for 

Direct 

Care 

Workers 

Evening and 

Weekend hours only 

Full or Fart Time 

Willing to train for 

positions 

Contact Sister Arlcne 

(708) 438-5050 

MOUNT ST. 
JOSEPH'S 

Lake Zurich 



DIRECT 
CARE 

NIGHT 



(9 p.m.-6 a.m.) 

Must include weekends 

Work with 

severely and 

profoundly 

mentally retarded 

women. Contact 

Sister Arlene 

Mount St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

708-438-5050 



RN/LPN 

Immediate Part- 
Time opening 

11:30am- 8pm 
and Saturday 

Contact 
Candy Sabay 




1 




PAIGE 

OFFICE POSITIONS 

$7.00-$15.00 per hr. 

•Secretaries 'Customer Service 

• Administrative • Data Entry 

•Reception •General Office 

•Accounting •Clerks 

Paige Temporary Inc. represents 
Major Local Companies 

with 
Immediate Openings 

Temporary and "Temp to Permanent" 

Full Time and Part Time 

Days & Evenings 

Paige offers group medical, paid holidays, paid vaca- 
tions and free software training in a professional 
environment which will put you in touch with the 
TOP LOCAL FIRMS!! 

Call Jeanne Randolph for a personal interview 

(708) 634-6622 

1175 Corporate Woods Pkwy 
Vernon Hills 



s.S> 



Entry Level 

In-Between Jobs 

Changing Careers 

Tired of not being appreciated? 

GREENE & Associates is a Major National Business Telemarketing 
Firm. We have several openings for our Telemarketing Representative 
position. With our comprehensive paid training program you will gain 
valuable marketing skills, improved communication ability as well as 
knowledge about many professions. 

^u'll speak with bankers, accountants, personnel managers, attor- 
neys and teachers. We market products that have recognized benefits 
to their buyers. 

*No Experience Necessary 

*FulI Paid Training 

*Competitive Salary 

Comprehensive Health/Dental Insurance 

*FuII/Part Time - Flexible Hours 

incentive Programs 

*Tuition Reimbursement 

*Employee Recognition Programs 

*Great Advancement Opportunities! 

Discover why GREENE is one of the largest employers in Central 
Lake County! You owe it to yourself to find out more. 

Call Sue Zickert NOW! (708) 816-2800 

GREENE 

Henry M. Greene & Associates, Inc. 

EOEM/F 



Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 7B 



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Here's the questions you'll 
be asked at the interview 



Are you nervous when you go to an 
interview? Are you never sure what the 
interviewer will ask? These are the Top 
20 questions most likely to be asked, 
according to The Endicott Report of 
Northwestern University. 

1. What are your long-range and 
short-range goals and objectives; when 
and why did you establish these goals; 
how are you preparing yourself to 
achieve them? 

2. What do you see yourself doing 
five years from now? 

3. How do you plan to achieve your 
career goals? 

4. Which is more important to you: 
Money or type of job? 

5. What do you consider to be your 
greatest strengths and weaknesses? 

6. How do you think a friend, 



teacher or former employer would de- 
scribe you? 

7. What motivates you to put forth 
your greatest effort? 

8. Why should I hire you? 

9. How do you evaluate or deter- 
mine success? 

10. In what ways do you think you 
can make a contribution to our com- 
pany? 

11. What qualities should a success- 
ful manager possess? 

12. What two or three accomplish- 
ments have given you the most satis- 
faction? Why? 

13. If you were hiring somebody for 
this position, what qualities would you 
look for? 

14. In what kind of work environ- 
ment are you most comfortable? 




Telemarketers 

SO OPENIN 

^STUDENTS 
^SENIORS 
*HOMEMAKERS 
*PROFESSIONAL 



LEFT 

WE 
TRAIN 
YOU 
EARN 



Convenient one stop application, Interview and fast hiring decision. Variety of projects In sales, 
appointment setting, & fund raising. Targeted lists, NO COLD CALLING, & no high pressure tactics. 
Friendly, casual, motivated environment. 16/25 hour schedules; more hours & advancement available. 

FLEXIBLE SHIFTS 

Days or Evenings/Saturdays 

GUARANTEED SALARY 

PLUS BONUSES 

THE TELEMARKETING CO. 

Rt. 134(NippersinkRd.) 

(Next to Kitt Carpet) 

ROUND LAKE 

708/546-2093 





TARGET 



^ 




Target is a rapidly growing upscale dis- 
count retailer in the Chicagoland area. 
We have positions to fill almost any avail- 
ability. Positions range from Cashier to 
Overnight Stacker to Hourly Supervisors. 
We provide all team members with med- 
ical benefits and 10% discounts. If you 
are fast, fun and friendly, please come 
and apply at: 

TARGET 
GREATLAND 



1. 1 



* 

ft 



6601 W. Grand 
Gurnee, I L 60031 

Target is a smoke-free, drug-free and 
an equal opportunity employer 



The 



^ 



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-© O f> O <D O €> O €> o §oto§ 

§ Presents: ° 

~ o ® o © o © o ® b ® Q®^ ^^sss 

tunities! 






offers Jo^J^^SJpver 35 compre- 
arles/wa^^^^^^^tecounts and 

the NoSiffl^iilarea will 
ga 

ober 4th 

Marriott 
kway No 
erfield, IL 

e Entry-! 
Following 

^counting* 
nt Office • 
•Sales* 
staurant* 

tchen* 
sekeeping- 

708-405-9666. If unable to attend, 

%k resume to: HumI^Ri§o:urlEes; 

P«Warkway North, \Deerneia, l£ 



rriott 



mm 



1 RESORTS • SUITES 



I 



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ft 







Old Country Store 



Immediate Full/Part-time Openings 

• Waiter AVaitr ess 
•Cashiers •Hostesses 

• Cooks •Dishwashers 

Experienced or we will train 
Must be 18 or over to apply 

-Apply in Person- 

Mon.-Fri. • 8:30am - 5pm 
1-94 and Grand Ave. • Gurnee 

EOEM/P 



C#^ft 



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DEPARTMENT MANAGERS 



WHERE IS YOUR RETAIL A 

g 



If your opportunities are limited. . .then it's time you considered Venture! 

As a S1.5 billion leader in the upscale discount retail Industry, we continue to grow by 
hiring only the best retail professionals. If you are ready to accept the Venture 
challenge. . .your career Is going to grow. 

Retail management experience is required, as well as strong organizational and 
Interpersonal skills. A college degree is a real plus. 

Our compensation is outstanding and our benefits complete. Discover why we are an 
Industry leader...wlth ongoing expansion creating the need for career-oriented profes- 
sionals. Send your resume to: Venture Stores, Inc., Regional Human Resources, 1 7 W. 
734 22nd Street, Oakbrook Terrace, IL 601 81 . Venture Is an equal opportunity employer 
committed to a diverse work culture. 



fi> 



8B Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October!, 1993 



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T, Newspapers 



Clear leaves from lawn regularly for healthy tips 



Because grass plants 
need sunlight to, make 
food, it's important to 
clear leaves from a lawn 
regularly to keep the 
plants exposed to the 
sun's rays. That's the ad- 
vice of the Professional 
Lawn Care Assn. of Amer- 
ica (PLCAA) for a healthy 
turf 

"In fall, grass plants go 
through a change. They 
use less energy for leafy 
growth that has to be 
mowed, in order to store 
more food in the root sys- 
tem for root zone devel- 
opment and a thicker, 
healthier lawn in spring," 
said Bob Traclnskl, certi- 
fied master gardener and 
consumer information 
manager for John Deere, a 
member of PLCAA. "That's 
why grass growth slows 
down In fall." 

"It's a good practice to 



remove leaves regularly so 
that chlorophyll can react 
with sunlight in the leaves 
of grass to produce sugars 
that are stored in the root 
system," Traclnski said. 
"Debris left on the lawn 
interferes with the pro- 
cess." 

PLCAA also advises 
that chopped leaves can 
make good material for a 
decorative mulch around 
trees and shrubs. When 
chopped into tiny pieces 
the mulch decomposes 
and releases nutrients into 
the soil. A circle of 
mulched leaves around a 
tree also makes it easier to 
trim the edge of a lawn 
without banging a mower 
into at tree and possibly 
scraping bark off its trunk. 
This is the number one 
cause of injury to trees. 

Chopped leaves make 
a good material for a 
backyard compost pile. 



Dry leaves and juicy grass 
clippings can be built up 
in layers and covered with 
soil to control odor. Sprin- 
kle some 10-10-10 fertil- 
izer on each layer and a 
scoop of lime to generate 
a continuing supply of 
enriched earth for land- 
scaping projects. Turn the 
compost regularly and 
keep it moist 

Lawn mower mulching 
attachments are available 
that chop grass clippings 
and leaves into such tiny 
bits that they can be blown 
down into turf where they 
disappear from view. Be - 
cause the pieces are tiny, 
they decompose quickly 
and return nutrients to the 
soil to feed the root sys- 
tem. Grass clippings are 
85 percent water so they 
break down fast, while re- 
turning 20 percent of their 
nitrogen content to feed 



the root zone. 

This process is called 
Grasscycllng — a term 
coined by PLCAA to de- 
scribe a public education 
program to reassure 
homeowners that it's okay 
to recycle grass clippings 
and leaves at home — 
without adding to a thatch 
buildup — in order to ease 
the burden on landfills. 



It's estimated that half of 
the nation's 5,500 landfills 
wilL close by the year 1996 
for a variety of reasons — 
lack of space, new regula- 
tions and tough licensing 
procedures. 

By removing leaves 
regularly and making 
good use of them at home, 
people can not only make 
a positive contribution to 



their lawns, but also to the 
environment by reducing 
the flower of waste to 
overburdened landfills. 
And with new mulching 
mowers, there's no need 
to rake leaves, or burn 
them at the curb. Consider 
them a valuable resource 
that can be returned to the 
earth in a natural process 
of decay and renewal. 



Mulch for a healthy fall garden 



What do wood chips, 
grass clippings, chopped 
leaves, buckwheat, cocoa 
hulls and salt hay have in 
common? According to 
the American Assn. of 
Nurserymen, they all 
make nutrient- rich 
mulches which can im- 
prove the health and ap- 



pearance of your garden. 
Mulching can enrich 
me quality of your soil and 
benefit your garden and 
landscape. In fact, 
mulching is recom- 
mended for many parts of 
your lawn, including the 
flower beds, shrubbery 
borders, vegetable gar- 



dens and foundation 
plantings. 

Many gardeners enjoy 
mulching because it is a 
simple activity with 
obvious results. To know 
how frequently or which 
type of mulch is best for 
your lawn, ask at your 
I local garden center. 




Wild Bird 



For your enjoyment of backyard birds™ 

Red Top Plaza 

1322 S. Milwaukee Avenue 

Libertyville, Illinois 60048 

(Behind Burger King) 




Open Mon.-Snt.: 10-6; Sunday 12-5 



549-9990 



Don't Sleep The Days Away 

Avoid The Christmas Rush 

Stop by now to take 

advantage of our 

reduced prices 

•Bird Feeders •Bird Baths 
•WildbirdSeed •Binoculars 
•Boot *Tapes •And More! 

r "" "" Wltr7fhl"Ad :"" I 

I 5% OFF Purchase Over s 25 I 
I 10% OFF Purchase Over *50 1 
J 15% Off Purchase Over '100 j 

[Expires 10/31/93 C93090s| 



* 



%^#r^#a*^^^^^m§##^ 



Mill Creek | 
Nursery 




40960 MILL CREEK RD., WADSWORTH, IL 



FALL IS THE TIME FOR PLANTING! 







$s 







SATURDAY & SUNDAY ONLY 

HOURS: 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

HARDY. LOCALLY GROWN 

^ SHADE TREES 

S ^t ORNAMENTALS 

"drnarrientaJs" ^^ ^ EVERGREENS 

~%>MUMS 

'Digging Trees Thru Dec. 1st. ""' )(^ personally select your trees in our nursery^ 
Landscape Architects and Horticulturists On Staff 

Phone 708-291-9129 

Directions to Mill Creek Nursery: 41 North to Rte. 173 (Rosecrans) 
West to (1 st Intersection) Mill Creek Rd., Left on gravel road 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign ^ 



fi 



2auC } s farm Martlet 





Coming' 
Soon 



We Have Apple Cider 

Qur3rdAnmcd 
Halloween Costume Contest 



RT. 120 (1 MILE WEST OF RT. 45) 

across from the drive in 

GRAYSLAKE 




YEAR 
CELEBRATION 



./. 



ETHELS PLACE 

FARM STAN D 

FAMILY RUN BUSINESS 
TOP QUALITY FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

Hours: 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Daily 

Sweet Com 

YbNow by color and Ethel's famous White Corn 

Red Ripe Tomatoes from our field 

Winter Onions & Potatoes 

Green Cabbage 1 9c/lb. or 

S6 00 a bushel 

Peppers $9 g5 /bushel 

Acorn Squash 29e/lb. 

Slicing Cucumbers 4/$1°° 

Idaho Bakers 69c/lb 

All Varieties Of Apples Available. 

•Peaches •Nectarines 

•Plums »Grapes 

Watermelon 

Now For Halloween! 

Pumpkins 29$/lb 

Indian Corn $2 48 a bunch 

Corn Stalks $2 W a bunch 

Pumpkins for Pies 25c/lb 

Gourds • Miniature Pumpkins 



We reserve the right to limit quantities. Prices in effect while quantities last. 

Located 1 1/2 mi North of Lake CookRd. on U.S. 12 

438-4440 



./ 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 33 






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Autumn is excellent time to build beautiful lawns 



A lush, green, lawn can 
be a home owner's pride 
and joy, as well as an asset 
when the time comes to 
sell, says Larry Pales, 
president of the Lake 
County Assn. of Realtors. 

However, beautiful . 
lawns, whether they pro - 
vide the Bwner enjoyment 
or help make a sale, don't 
grow that way by them- 
selves, he notes. "Autumn 
is an excellent time of year 
to build a lawn and help it 
recover from the ravages 
of the hot summer sun. 
Steps taken by early Octo- 
ber can give a lawn a head 
start on the spring plant- 
ing season," Fales advises. 

Fall is an ideal time for 
planting grass seed. 
Weeds that thrive during 
hot summer months lie . 




dormant, and young grass 
does not suffer from 
summer heat. Further- 
more, grass seed planted 
will have time to sprout 



and provide the yard with 
an insulating cover for 
winter. "Don't discount 
the value of insulation 
provided by. grass. It just 
might keep underground 
pipes from freezing in the 
winter," Fales says. 

Proper cultivation is 
the key step, both in 
planting new lawns and 
reviving existing ones. 
The following are a few 
tips on cultivation pro- 
vided by the Lawn Insti- 
tute: 

• Expose the soil. A 
sharp- fined tool is suit- 
able for small areas, but a 
power-operated lawn 
thinner might be more 
appropriate for larger 
jobs. 

• When the turf is 
thinned out, gouge the 




313 



TOOL EQUIPMENT 

RENTAL & SALES 

ENTAL inc. 



EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR YOUR FALL PLANTING' 
AND CLEAN-UP OUTSIDE OF YOUR HOME AND YARD 



• Power Rakes 

• Tillers 

• Post Hole Diggers 

• Sod Cutters 

• Chipper Shredders 

• Log Splitters 

• Front End Loaders 

• Leaf Vacuum 

• Paint Sprayers 

• 40' Man Lift 

• 2 Yd. Mini Dump Truck 

• Slit Seeders 

• Aerators 

• Chain Saws 

"EWE NEED IT- 
ewe RENT IT FROM RAM" 

HlB 120 1/2 milaWast of Hainesvills 
Round Uke Park 




(708) 740-8800 
1 -(800) 974-8801 




* - 



E 



ALL 

Hurry Quqhtitie s lAiiiitefl 



gg *21" Recycler 9 Super Pro 9 Mower, 
•5.5 hp. Brlggs & Stratton 
Engine ^> 

•Guaranteed to Starl/^ LOITipa T6 

s Years ^The New T0R0 
HXL Before You Buy 

fflf Hydrostatic Transmission 
OT 115 HP Commercial Engine 
Or Electric Start-Standard 
QT 38" Recycler Deck-Standard 
a" Lights Standard 
a- 20" Turning Radius 
Of 2 Year Warranty 

Model 
1238 
HXL 



NEW FOR 1993! 




Master Service 
Dealer Offers: 

•Professional Assembly Which Includes 
Set-up, Service and All Adjustments 

•Factory Trained Mechanics 

•Authorized Warranty Service 

•Genuine Toro Parts 



GRAYSLAKE FEED SALES 

Outdoor Power Equipment 

Rt.120&SlusserSt. 223-6333 



soil. Grass seed will lodge 
in the holes, finding a 
place to sprout. 

• Add fertilizer, prefer- 
ably a type rich in nitro- 
gen. The amount of fertil- 
izer needed depends on 
the type used. For major 
lawn makeovers, fertilizer 
should not be spread until 
grading is completed. 
Otherwise, it will be un- 
evenly distributed. 

• Once cultivation is 
completed, plant the 
grass seed, spreading it 
evenly. About two pounds 



per 1,000 square feet 
should be sufficient if a 
spreader is used. Water 
the seeds and cover with 
mulch, such as a thin layer 
of straw, to keep the area 
moist. After the first water- 
ing, the seedbed will re- 
main moist with occa- 
sional light sprinklings. 

According to the Lawn 
Institute, perennial rye 
grass will sprout within a 
few days. Fine fescue or 
Kentucky Bluegrass vari- 
eties take longer; sprout- 
ing probably will not oc- 
cur for about two to three 



weeks. 

The new grass should 
be watered and mowed 
before it reaches twice its 
customary height. After 
the second mowing, dust- 
free lawn food may be ap- 
plied. Late-blooming 
dandelions and winter 
weeds can be eliminated 
with weed-feed applica- 
tions. - 

The yard is the first 
thing buyers see when 
they drive up to look at a 
home. "A healthy lawn 
definitely adds curb ap- 
peal," Fales says. 







RAYT. NICHOLAS 
ESTATE AUCTION 

FINE ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES, ART, BOOKS & FURNITURE 

WedNEstky, OctoBer 6, 1 995 ~ 10:00 a.m. 

OWe STRATford HaII ' 54 S. Seymour * CRAysUlcE, IlliNols 
Porcelain Minatures; Antique Vases, Bottles, Dishes, Tureens, Etc. 
•Haviland, Lalique, Fostoria, Nippon, Limoges, Bavarian, Noritake, 
Pickard, Hobnail, Milk Glass; Oneida Silver Plate W/Chest; Antique 
Jewelry & Cases; Antique Jet Bead Wedding Dress & Jewelry; Cavalry 
Swords; Rare Books, Antique Oils, Water Colors, Prints & Needlework; 
1894 Marble Top Dresser W/Gallery Mirrors; John M. Smith 4-PC Ivory 
Sectional; Cushman Dining Table W/ Leaf, 6-Chr; Antique Cabinets, 
Tables & Chair's; Cuckoo Clocks; Rugs; Horace Vase Violins & Bows; 1908 
Speed Queen Washing Machine; Large Collection Of Precious Moments- 
1977-1983; Original Art by Willadene Nicholas; Many Other Fine Items. 
Terms: Cash or Certified funds; Checks only with bank letter of guarantee. 

HERMAN BEHM & ASSOCS., AUCTIONEERS 
ANTIOCH.IL 708/395-1941 





■GARDEN 



RTE. 12 & 



o 
o 



Volo, Illinois 
015-344-1117 




CMP, D8 \?m 




TREES • SHRUBS • LAWNS • BULBS 




Landscape with Garden Corner 

You Install or We Install - Either Way You SAVE! 



A Qu» ftty Full Swvk » G*rd«i C*n«w 
LandicajM DMga ConslnicUQn>H*lnlMunc« 

THE GARDEN CORNER 
IS OPEN EVERYDAYI 







# 



■'.* 



1 



34 Lakeland Nowipapon 



Friday, October 1 , 1993 



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^Lakeland 

T,. Newspapers 

-fcW r 



It's nearly time to capture bright autumn colors 



As you don a jacket 
and prepare to enjoy the 
crisp, fresh; spectacular 

days of autumn, what do 
the falling temperatures 
and shorter days mean to 
tree leaves? 

Leaves owe their fall 
colors to genetic and envi- 
ronmental factors. Inher- 



ited traits remain con- 
stant, but the changing 
environment explains 
why some years produce a 
breath-taking display, and 
other autumns result in 
disappointing colors. 
Similar to the way one 
person inherits brunette 
and another one blonde, 
trees turn different colors 



depending on inherited 
red, yellow, and orange . 
pigments. Expect your 
best fall color when the 
environment provides a 
favorable growing season 
followed by clear autumn 
days and 40 to 45 degrees 
nights; hard frosts blacken 
leaves and cause them to 
fall early, 



preen Chlorophyll, 
which manufactures food 
inside the leaf, masks the 
yellow and orange pig- 
ments you admire each 
fall in the maple, ash, 
birch, hickory, sycamore, 
cottonwood, poplar, black 

cherry, and alder. With 
the onset the cool weather 
and shorter days, chloro- 



Begin winterizing roses now 



Most species bush 
roses, ramblers and ever 
blooming types are quite 
capable of surviving Lake 
County winters without 
protection. 

Hybrid tea roses are 
marginally hardy in this 
climate so they take spe- 
cial care. Begin now by 
collecting mulching ma- 
terials to cover your 
plants. Stockpile some top 
soil, enough for a 10 or 12 
inch mound around each 
plant Keep the soil where 
It won't freeze up and 
cover it to keep it dry. You 
will also need some Insu- 
lating materials such as 
shredded leaves hay or 
evergreen branches. 

Keep applying your 
regular foliar fungicides to 
protect the remaining 
leaves from ieafspot and 
mildew as long as they 
remain on the plant. Keep 



spent blooms cut off as 
they fade. 

When the last leaves 
have dropped rake as 
many out of the beds as 
possible to reduce over- 
wintering diseases, and 
make a fungicide appli- 
cation thoroughly cover- 
ing the plants and soil. 
Cut back overly long canes 
so they aren't whipped 
about by winter winds. If 
you plan to use rose 
cones, cut the plants back 
to appropriate size. 

Mound each plant 
with a foot of soil. When 
the ground has frozen add 
another 10 or 12 inches of 
the organic mulch as insu- 
lation to keep the plants 
frozen in. Hold the mulch 
in place with wire, 
branches, or rose cones. If 
you use cones be sure they 
are ventilated. They can 
be very warm inside on a 



bright winter day. 

Tree roses and climb- 
ing hybrid teas created 
another problem. These 
plans need the same pro- 
tection as the bush teas. 
Take climbers down from 
their support, mound soil 
over them, particularly 
over the graft union. 

Tree roses have two 
grafts so they are best 
protected by loosening 
the roots on one side of 
each plant Lay the plant 
in a trench and cover with 
soil and mulch. 

Wrapping tree roses 
with straw and burlap 
rarely works here because 
winters are so changeable. 

When spring arrives, 
remove the mulch and 
wash away the soil mound 
with the garden hose. Late 
spring frosts rarely do any 
damage to roses other 
than nipping a few leaves. 




mecHa 

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• 3-position throttle interlock. 



You get the $10 Mail-tn-Rebate plus FREE Gas Can & Oil Mix 
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200 W. Northwest Hwy - Barrington 
(1 block West of Rt. 59 on Rt. 14) 708-381-1084 



phyll breaks down quicker 
then replacement occurs, 
allowing the carotenoids 
and xanthophyils (yellow 
and orange pigments) to 
take center stage. 

Unlike the carotenes, 
the red and purple colors 
produced by anthocyanin 
pigments aren't present 
during the summer but 



develop in autumn. Dur- 
ing the growing season, a 
large supply of phos- 
phates in a leaf breaks 
down sugars for the tree to 
use. These phosphates 
migrate into the stem 
when fall weather sets in, 
allowing for sugar accu- . 
mulation and antho- 
cyanin production. 



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BRING YOU NATURE'S MAGIC! 

•Easy-to-plant •Sure-to-bloom 
•Wide assortment available 



House Plants 20% Off 



Complimentary bag of mixed bird 
seed with purchase of any feeder. 

Visit our greenhouse. We have 

a wide variety of mums still 

available for fall planting. 



Leiders 



HOURS 

Mon.-Fri. 9 to 6 

GARDEN GREENERY INC. Iu'nda? y fo'tos 



Located 2 miles north of Grayslake on the comer of Rte. 83 & Lake Street 

223-2422 



Friday, October!, 1993 . 



Lakeland Newspapers 35 



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,*.<,*' _ 




SSM^t Lakeland 

j, 'r Xewspiipei'S 




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Several important f don f ts ? for do-it-yourselfers 



. Before you tackle that 
new repair on your own, 
the editors at Chilton 
Book Company, pub- 
lishers of more than 200 
books on automotive re- 
pairs for do-it-yourselfers, 
have some simple advice 
for safely servicing your 
vehicle. 

•Don't run an engine 
without proper ventila- 



tion. Carbon monoxide is 
poisonous; it takes a 
longtime to leave the 
body, and you can build 
up a deadly supply in 
your system by simply 
breathing in a little every 
day. Always use power 
vents, windows and fans, 
or open the garage doors. 

•Don't work around 
moving parts while wear- 



ing a necktie or loose 
clothing. 

•Don't wear jewelry of 
any kind. Long hair 
should be hidden under a 
cap. 

•Don't smoke when 
working around gasoline 
or other flammable ma- 
terial. 

•Don't smoke when 



<3IB AUDI ° 



AREA'S 



EARTHQUAKE 



BELVIDERE & LEWIS AVE. 
WAUKEGAN 

Next to Giant Auto 

•Car Stereos 
•Speakers 

•Amps & Accessories 
•Hand-Built Custom Bass 
Enclosures 



B&B AUDIO DRIVERS 



EARTHQUAKE 



Plexy Bass Box 

with 2 Earthquake Subs 

^29 " 



NOW OPEN: 9AM - 7PM - 7 DAYS 

sa 623 - B 9£ M m 



working around the bat- 
tery. When the battery is 
being charged, it gives off 
explosive hydrogen gas. 

•Don't use gasoline to 
wash your hands. Gaso- 
line may contain lead, 
which can enter the body 
through a cut. Gasoline 
also removes natural oils 
from skin, so bone-dry 
hands will suck up oil 
and grease. 

•Don't service the air- 
conditioning system until | 



you've checked with state 
and local authorities to 
determine regulations re- 
garding disposal of CFCs. 
Also, be sure you have the 
necessary tools and train- 
ing. Some refrigerants are 
extremely cold and, when 
exposed to the air, will in- 
stantly freeze any surface 
they contact, including 
your eyes. Although re- 
frigerants are normally 
nontoxic, some become a 
deadly poisonous gas in 



the presence of an open 
flame. 

•Don't use screw- 
drivers for anything other 
than driving screws. A 
screwdriver used as a 
praying tool can snap 
when you least expect it 

, 'Don't use a bumper 
jack for anything other 
than changing a flat In - 
vest In a hydraulic floor 
jack of at least 1 1/2-ton 
capacity, and at least two 
sturdy jackstands. 



a. Things to Do : fi 

1 . Call Don at Classy Chassis to get ore-winter check - 
ALSO: Have antifreeze changed (24,000 miles!) 
to avoid damage to heads a 






2 . Drop Mom's car at Clas&y 
for o\\ change 



yyA'.vwKw-w.M.v.x.: 



«*»™«wyww«iW'» 



3 . Ask Don at Classy about 
Tom Jr.'s beater 



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N 
A 

MITSUBISHI 
FUSO 



ORTHSIDE TRUC 



I 



Iv 



812 North Lake Street • Mundelein, Illinois 60060 
(Route 45 One block North Of Route 176) 

(708) 949-9220 

CLOSE OUT! 

on All Mitsubishi-Fuso 

Trucks 



•Dumps 
•Dry Vans 
•Flat Beds 
•Stake Beds 
& More 









m^wm 


^fl^4^£E* 







1987 Mitsubishi FK455 

28,000 GVW, 6 cyl, diesel, 5 spd., 

air horn, air/hydraulic brakes. 

18* Capital insulated body. 

Carrier Fuel Miser. #1450 

Sharp Truck!! 



1990 Mitsubishi FK415 

23,000 GVW w/22' produce insulated 
van roll up rear, curb.& road side 
doors, Carrier Sun-Bird unit. #2747 ' 

Like New! 





1987 Mitsubishi FM555 

32,900 GVW, new paint with 22' 

Delta Lo-temp body Thermoking TD 

130 cycle sentry, curb side, road side 

doors, swing rear doors, lift gate. #59 

Call For Demo Price! 



1993 Mitsubishi FM557 

32,900, GVW, demo, 22' New body 
with Thermoking MDII Max with x 
cycle sentry. #64 

Call For Demo Price! 







Li/ : 



N 



ORTHSIDE TRUC 



1 



T 



K 




812 North Lake Street • Mundelein, Illinois 60060 

(Route 45 One block North Of Route 176) 

(708) 949-9220 



•Dumps 
•Dry Vans 
•Flat Beds 
•Stake Beds 
& More 



V!»S»*»*»*" f%m aqi- SSI IT! ^^*""Z*8% 




CLOSE OUT! 

on 
All Isuzu Trucks 




^w^r: 



1989 Isuzu FSR 

22,000 GVW. Automatic, PS, Air Over 

Hydraulic, Air Cond. 24' FRP van w/ 

ramp. 9R22.5 tires, dock height 

NonCDL truck. #760 

Just In! 





1993 Isuzu NPR 

14,250 GVW. Auto, PS, 14' new 

Morgan thermolite Body, 4 piece rear 

door. Thermoking CBCI-2 

Refrigeration unit. #9908 

Priced Right! 



1988 Isuzu NPR 

13,250 GVW. Auto (just rebuilt) 

PS, 16' Aluminum van body. 

#4370. 

Just In! 





1988 Isuzu 

22,000 GVW. 5 speed. PS, air over 

hydraulic. 16' plus refrigerated 

w/Thermoking MD-1 

w/stand-by. #20 

Nice Truck! 






■ 






i 

•: 
: 

4 






36 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



' ' " 



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Up 






AHEW J owned \PR0eiEM? 

*HE1/B@I.^ OPERATED S^BMHELP! 

,tHW Vh 1 ?, p n | R e 1926^08-223-8851 






NO INVENTORY SHORTAGE!! 

OVER 350 

'93s IN STOCK!! 

JKN'wJsHfeJimeloSave.. 



.::■;: j 
■■■'..■ : 
■•-,-: 

/•'■ ■'''■!• 

.'- '-': | 

' ■ ■■ \ 

■ .■ ■': ■■ 





' -" : : : ■• 





NC 




G 



APR AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS 

FOR 48 MONTHS WITH APPROVED CREDIT ON CAVALIERS, CAPRICES & CEO STORMS. 



, ..•:. .'•;'. 



10 

WAMBLE 

FROM 

.H0CKBI6ACH 



ALL 
NEW 
1993 CHEVY 
CAMARO'S 



SPECIAL PURCHASE 

NEW'93 

CARGO 

VAN 




% 



•j. 



H it l fit 

P*cMclM*$, Hutlag * Air CtomaalB§ 
Htptimtn, Human, Cvptntm, 




WITH UTILITY SHELVING UNIT 
INCLUDED AT NO EXTRA C0ST1 



LAKE COUNTY'S 

#1 VAN CONVERSIONS 

HEADQUARTERS 






NEW 
1993's 








W&£$M 




Etlztte. 



NEW '93 
CAVALIER 

VLa-DOORCOU^E 

$ 7595 



NEW '93 
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■l-DOOR SEDAN 

$ 9995 



NEW '93 S-10 
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ECONOMY SPECIAL! 



NEW '93 
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$7695 1*10,875 





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2-DOOR HATCHBACK 



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2-DOOR COUPE 



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NEW '93 



4DOOR SEDAN 



NEW 93 S-10 
BLAZER 

THE FUN MACHINE* 



$12,695 ■ $13,995 




?»' 



MR. ROCKENBACH'S 
WHOLESALE SPECIALS 

'92 CAVALIER CON V. ™iu $ 9950 

'89 CORSICA $ 3795 

'91 METRO $ 4850 

'92 METRO CONVERTIBLE $ 8650 

'85 CORVETTE $ 11,795 

'90 METRO $ 3650 



NEW '93 



APV VAN 

$14,995 



* Rebates And Incentives Included. Plus Tax, Title, License And Doc Fee. 



hW*te? 



'92TORONADOTROFEO.. 



.rG^!T' ' - . - ' - " u 



'91S-10BLZR.4DR.4X4... $ 14,35O 



'92MITS300QGTVR. 



'92 Z/34, Red. 






fi'iiiaJUicattiK 



'92 SUBURBAN 4x4. 



SAVE 11 '91 BERETTA CPE $ 8995 \ '91 Z/34 RED 



*Wj**"»f'-« 



'89 MAZDA MPV VAN.. $ 11 JL 495 



""■ w ^ ^^^ 



*12,950 



'85CORVEnE. 



'89 CAMARO. 



$7995 



'88 S10 BL ZR.4X4 TA HOE 



'92 CAVALIER CONVERTIBLE.. $ 9950 



'9 3 S-10 BLZR. 2 DR. 4x4.... SAVE 



SE5S32B3T 



'92 K-5 BLZR. 4X4 



86 CORVETTE CPE... s 12 # 995 

■ iii i i i — - . -' j.... ^ ... .... i M -. J 



TRUCK SPECIALS 



93 FORD XLT P/U... LOADED 



, '92 ASTRO EXT. VAN passIho er 



y I O" I r/U... ...... ........... ^W M M ^f 






75 CORVETTE. 



MUST 



'93 GRAND MARQ. LS. 



LIKE 

NEW 



'92 S-10 BLZR. 4x4. 



SAVE 



tf&fi£>* 



.■,-- '"■^•frtmc. 



SSSJSS. 



'92CHEV1500 4X4..... 



STEP 
SIPE 



CAR SPECIA LS 



' 87 CAPRICE S/W $ 5995 



'92 Z/24 RED $ 1I,995 



'92 CAV ALIER R.S jtwlsm s 



ROCK BOTTOMS 

COME AND SEE 
OVER 20 CARS 

PE_"iX RtW I* '-*"* 1 ".fc. f -"Jll !i-l 1 ,, "*S>_ 







'88 CAVALIER Z2 4 
'92 GEO STORM 



'92 CORSICA LT S u. M .,3„. $ 895Q , 






■M M i m P Qg^ .^^^g'^^'gs^pj^gMas^a g^SBEigE^ 



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ai^iEsszESi^szgsassssissKSE&iSSn^^^ 



'89 3/4 SUBURBAN 454....... : cl : ean 



c^ri^rsZ'^Si'ia^zrjasE 



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'91 GEO METRO. 



$ 4850 



87 CLUB WAGON 12 PASS. $ 5995 



5SKa5Z2BS2ffiS25S^5^iC'^C'J~\l ; i::r^SEa& 



.'93 SATURN SL2........ $ 14 # 450 I 



'90 S-10 BLAZER 4x4... $ U,995 R | 'T^Jwf !4 d . T / ;/i fW j 



PAYS YOU CASH 
FOR YOUR 



5 8450 I! '92 CHEVY CAPRICE... S 11 # 995 



'89 LESABRE CUSTOM $ 795Q, 



W.l 



'92 METRO CONVERTIBLE. $ 8650 



^^ , ^^C i r?'^|^ , 7^^^^^ : ^VWt 



'89 FORD C0NV. VAN $ 11 y 95Q ! I '92 PROBE G.L $ 1O # 35O|i ; 90SUNBIRD CONVERTIBLE. $ 7495 , 



tlffl 



'93 S-10 BLZR. 4 DR. 4x4.. SAVE|| '90 GEO jjjjjjTgfij^^ 





Seii Your Car, Truck 
Or Van To USU 






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Lakeland Newspapers 37 



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<j 







OBITUARIES 



'•fiffl*&?^y^^feft# :: ^^ 



Clarence "Bill" G.Dettke 

Age 64, a resident of McHcnry, IL for ihc past 20 years, 
formerly of Chicago, died Friday, September 24, 1993 in Sun 
City Center, Florida. He was bom in Chicago on April 13, 
1929 to Ouo and Helen (Heckcs) Dcttkc. "Bill" later served 
with Ihc U.S. Marines during the Korean War. He owned and 
operated North Center Cleaners, Inc. in Chicago prior to his 
retirement 

Survivors include his wife Theresa (ncc WachUcr); two 
daughters Linda (Tom) Hoffman of Chicago and Jcancttc 
Jones of Lombard; four grandchildren Matthew and Margaret 
Hoffman and Emily and Amanda Jones; and one sister Frieda 
Thcbcrt of Eustis, FL. 

Friends may call from 10:30 until services at 11:00 a.m. 
Saturday, October 2, 1993 at the K.K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, 12 N. Pislakcc Lake Rd., Fox Lake, IL (in the Chapel 
on the Lake). Interment private Memorials can be made to the 
Heart Association of Lake County, 1 117 S. Milwaukee Ave., 
Suite 10, Libcnyville, IL 60048. 

Wanda H. Oftedah! 

Age 9 1 of Antioch, EL passed away Friday, September 24, 
1993 at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, Lindcnhurst, 
IL, She was bom January 15, 1902 in Story City, Iowa and has 
lived in Antioch since 1944. She was 8 charter member of St. 
Stephen Lutheran Church in Antioch and a member of the 
Antioch Women's Club. Mrs. Oftcdahl worked as an office 
manager for Frostcc Foam of Antioch before her retirement. 
On May 17, 1923 she married John Oftcdahl in Camby, 
Minnesota and he preceded her in death on May 31, 1952. 

Survivors include one son Everett (Elaine) Oftedahl of 
Antioch, IU two brothers Sandford (Evelyn) Soma of Fergus 
Falls, MN and Arnold (June) Soma of Fairmont, MN; and 
three sisters Margaret Sisson of Antioch, Alma (Oscar) 
Strombcrg of Fairmont, MN and Hazel Johnson of Blue Earth, 
MN; grandmother of seven, great-grandmother of eight and 
grcal-grcat-grandmothcr of one. She was also preceded in 
death by one daughter, Joyce Hagcmann; one brother Gcrold 
Soma and three sisters Irene Bliss, Jenny Nordaunc and Lois 
Schneider. 

Funeral services were held Tuesday, September 28, 1993 
at St. Stephen Lutheran Church of Antioch with Pastor Charles 
Miller and Rev. Philip Laurin officiating. Interment was in Ml 
Emblem Cemetery, Elmhurst, IL. Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch handled the arrangements. Those desiring may make 
contributions to the Antioch Rescue Squad, St. Stephen 
Lutheran Church of Antioch or to the Guiding Eyes for the 
Blind, 611 Granite Spring Rd., Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 
in her memory. 

Linda Peltonen-Jokela 

Age 76, of Iron wood, Michigan passed away peacefully 
September 23, 1993 at Winona, Minnesota. 

She is survived by her children Rosemary (Michael) 
Forcsta of Round Lake Beach, Michael (Joan) Pcltoncn of 
Lake in the Hills, Susan Vazquaz of California, Richard Jokela 
of Johnsburg, and Dean (Darla) Jokela of Winona, Minnesota. 
Also surviving are six sisters and one brother. She was a 
grandmother of 26, including local residents Dcnisc Garcia, 
Kevin Cox, Kenneth Cox, Linda Cox, Kathcrinc and Karen 
Forcsta, all of Round Lake Beach; Stuart Cox of Round Lake 
Park; Scott Cox of Vemon Hills; Davis Cox of Fox Lake, Eric 
Cox of Lake Villa; and 13 great-grandchildren. She was 
preceded in death by husbands Matthew Pcltoncn (1946) and 
Ame Jokela (1991). 

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, October 2 in 
. Ironwood, Michigan. Arrangements are handled by Kctola 
Funeral Home, Ironwood. Cremation will follow. 



*ju<anas tjrunexalwAafoel, iucC. 




fttMJ^mn 



Fourth Generation Family offering 
sincerity sensitivity Si comfort in your 
time of need. 

We work with your best interest in 
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We encourage you to learn more about 
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Inquiries we always welcome. 



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Insurance Plan 
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Personal caring for over SO years 

410 East Belvidere Rd. Grayslake 

223*8122 



Thomas Heater 

Age 61 of Round Lake Park, IL passed away September 

21, 1993 at Midwestern Hospital in Zion. He was bom April 
26, 1932 in Orlando, West Virginia, the son of the late David 
and Elsie King Heater. He had been a resident of Round Lake 
Park for 26 years, formerly of Wheeling, IL. He was a veteran 
of the Korean War, a member of the Lake Villa VFW Post 
#4308 for 25 years. He had been employed as a maintenance 
engineer for Packing Corporation of America (Ekco Products) 
in Wheeling. 

. He is survived by his wife Diane (nee Walusiak), whom 
he married October 11, 1955 in Chicago; his children Dorothy 
Sartin of Mundelcin, IL; Daniel (Deborah) Heater of Mokena, 
IL; Dennis Heater, Douglas Heater, David Heater and Donna 
(Randall) Wagner, all of Round Lake Park; grandfather of 
Daniel H, Jeremiah, Chantellc, Thomas Wayne II, Jessica, 
Merry, Brandy, Victoria, and Austin; brother of Chris (Thea) • 
Healer of Flagler Beach, FL; Mable Ann (Jack) Wine of 
Canton, OH; Darrel (Nancy) Heater of Lodson, SC; Jack 
Heater and Rebecca Niggemcycr, both of West Virginia. He 
was preceded in death by his son Darren in 1966. 

Visitation was held Friday, September 24, 1993 at Justcn's 
Round Lake Funeral Home, 222 North Roscdalc Court (Cedar 
Lake Road at Roscdalc Court). Funeral services were held 
Saturday, September 25, 1993 at 10:00 a.m. in the funeral 
home. Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery, Lake Villa, 

George J. Kontaxis 

Age 61 of Round Lake Heights passed away Tuesday, 
September 21 , 1993 at Condell Medical Center in Libertyvillc, 
Illinois. George was bom August 4, 1932 in Chicago, Illinois 
to George and Lula Johnson Kontaxis. He had been a resident 
of Round Lake Heights for over 30 years. Formerly employed 
with Skokic Valley Asphalt Company of Grayslake for over 
35 years building roads. Later employed with Meridian Road 
Construction Company of Like Bluff. He was a member of the 
Lake Villa United Methodist Church and served in the U.S. 
Army from 1950 to 1956. 

He is survived by his wife Edith (ncc Bums) whom he 
married on December 21, 1949 in Chicago, Illinois; six 
daughters, Diane (Charles) Franklin of Round Lake Heights; 
Susan (Dennis) Robinson of Round Lake, Park; Barbara 
(Wesley) Scholz of Round Lake Heights; Cindy Jewell of 
Round Lake Park; Mary (Wade) Scholz of Round Lake 
Heights; Gloria (James) Anderson of Round Lake Beach; 
grandfather of 21; great-grandfather of two; a sister Juanita 
(George) Bycr of Oak Lawn, IL. He was preceded in death by 
a son Harold July 26, 1987; two brothers Thomas and 
William, three sisters Evelyn, Christine and Helen. 

Visitation was Saturday, September 25, 1993 from 3:00 
p.m. until time of service at 8:00 p.m. al the Justcn's Round 
Lake Funeral Home, 222 North Roscdalc Court (Cedar Lake 
Road at Rosedalc Court) with Rev. Ralph Smith officiating. 
Interment was at Highland Memorial Park Cemetery, 
Libertyvillc. 

Bonnie R. Lutz, nee Kraut 

Age 68 of Long Lake, IL died on Wednesday, September 

22, 1993. She was bom on May 25, 1925 in Monterey, WI to 
Cornelius and Mary (Manning) Kraut. Bonnie was very active 
in the Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church in Long Lake and 
had been a Sunday School teacher for 24 years. On August 18, 
1946 she married Winfield Lutz at Zion Lutheran Church in 
Ashippun.WL 

She is survived by her daughter Christine (Daniel) Quinn 
of Round Lake; son Gregory Lutz of Long Lake; three sisters 
Alyce (Douglas) Hanson of Oconomowoc, WI; Angclinc 
(Erhard) Pagcnkopf of Ashippun, WI and Rosctta (Phillip) 
Bcahlcn of Palmyra, WI; two brothers Raymond Kraut of 
Watcrtown, WI and Dale (Barbara) Kraut of Milwaukee, WI; 
four grandchildren, one great-grandchild and other relatives 
and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband 
Winfield and brother Robert. 

Funeral services were held on Saturday, September 25, 
1 993 at the Pagenkopf Funeral Home, Oconomowoc, WI. Rev. 
Paul Wceg officiated. Interment was at St. Paul's Cemetery, 
Sugar Island, WI. A memorial service will also be held al 
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, Long Lake. 




Phone: (708) 223-9240 

EVERLASTING MEMORIALS 

FormeriyBUEHLER MEMORIALS 
of Round Lake 

"A Lasting Tribute" 

33107 N. Hwy. 45*WILOWOOD, ILLINOIS 60030 



Finest Design 
Finest Materials 
Finest Craftsmanship 
No Work Too Large Or 
Too Small 



EXPERIENCE 
DIGNITY 
REPUTATION 
Your Personal 
Inspection Invited 



SERVING ALL FAITHS AND CEMETERIES 



V monuments 

V markers 

V bronze plaques 



V mausoleum 
v* cemetery lettering and 
repairs and cleaning 

REASONABLE PRICES - All year long 




DEATH NOTICES 



CARR 

Alice B. Garr (ncc 

Kennedy) of Wauconda,- 

IL. Arr: Wauconda 

Funeral Home, 

Wauconda, IL. 

FORWE 

George N. Forwc, 81, of 

North Chicago, IL. Arr: 
Salata Funeral Home, 

North Chicago, IL. 

JUPIN 

Andrew J. Jupin, 84, of 
Lake Zurich, IL. Arr: 
Ahlgrim & Sons Funeral 
Home, Lake Zurich, IL. 

LENZEN 

Alice M. Lenzen, 76, of 

Grayslake, IL. Arr: 

Strang Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake, IL.' 

LEVAND 

Arthur Fred Levand, 76, 

of Libertyvillc, IL. Arr: 
McMurrough Chapel, 

Libertyvillc, IL. 

MILLS 

Clemens E. Mills, 81, of 

Libertyvillc, formerly of 

Waukegan, IL. Arr: 

Burnett-Dane Funeral 

Home, Libertyvillc, IL. 

PERRY 

Charles William "Bill" 
Perry, 79, of Spring Hill, 
FL, formerly of 
Mundelcin, IL. Arr: 
Private. 



PRICE 

LaVontae Tyrcll Price, 5 
days, of North Chicago, 
IL. Arr: Bradshaw & 
Range Funeral Homes, 
Waukegan & Zion, IL. 
SCHEDULER 
Albert E. Schcibler, 89, 
of Libertyvillc, IL. Arr: 

McMurrough Chapel, 
Libertyvillc, IL. 

SEGER 

Stephen R. Scgcr, 26, of 

Lake Villa, IL. Arr: 
Justcn's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, Round 

Lake. IL. 
SUTHERLAND 

Roger A. Sutherland, 97, 

of Mundelcin, IL. Arr: 

Private. 



TARACHAS 

Harold Tarachas, 67, of 
Mundelcin, IL. Arr: 
Kristan Funeral Home, 
P.C., Mundclein, IL. 

VENTURA 

Charles Ventura, 70, of 
Gumcc, JL. Am Gumec 
Funeral Home Ltd., 
Gumec, IL. 

WARNER 

Louise (Basclcy) 

Schwcrman Warner, 81, 
of Wauconda, IL. Arr: 
Private. 

YORK 

Norma Jean York, 67, of 
Gumcc, IL, formerly of 
Waukegan, IL. Arr: The 
Gumcc Funeral Home, 
Gumcc, IL. 



INMEMOKYOP 




^il To Linda Pierce - My Mother 1^ 

by Mary Pierce 

When you left, I felt the pain 

Thoughts of you still remain 

In my mind 1b 'where you are 

Although you're gone, you're never far. 

In every thought you ore there, 

Even though I'm not aware. 

All my thoughts to you belong, 

I feel much pain, I must be strong. 

You are kept within my heart 

Though you're gone 

- We'U never part. 

In loving memory, we all miss you, 

,_,_ Mary, David, Bruce and John IHcrce, ^^ 

ZTl your brother Leon Oeng and family and your mom. ffE 



Griefnotes\ 

Can children benefit 

from funerals? 

Children are sensitive and emotional when a death 
in the family occurs. Children can benefit from a 
" chance to attend the funeral and say their goodbyes. 
Like adults, children need some time to adjust and 
understand what has taken place. Seeing the 
deceased and understanding that death is different 
than life helps children avoid myths that suggest the 
deceased has only gone away or gone to sleep. 
Children who loved the deceased will gain from the 
chance to be a part of a meaningful ceremony. They 
should be told' that the ceremony and viewing are 
special ways to remember the deceased. Naturally, 
children should only participate if they wish. 

ft/fa #o&*tat„,caf/ 






*<&§, 









^jtfjMW 



12 N. Plstakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
Phone:(708)587-2100 • {815)385-1001 









• ■ 



m 



38 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



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ANNOUNCEMENTS 







Notices 




Personals 



■ROMATIC CANDLELITE 

WEDDINGS' Smotoy Mountains 
'Ordained Ministers 'Elegant 
Chapel 'Photographs 'Florals 
*Umos *Vldeos *8rldal Suites 
with Jacuzzis *No waltlng4)taod 
tests *Galllnburg, Term* 1/800- 
933-7464. 

"REUNION 1 1" 
LAKE ZURICH HIGH SCHOOL 
Class ol 1073 Is Planning their 
20th Class Reunion for Oct. 
1993. 8 you have any MormaBon 
or need any— I you have moved 
or know of anyone who has, 
please contact Sharon (706)566- 
4724 or Debbie (708)516-4313. 
Please call H you would like to 
net). - 

ATTENTION: NEEDY FAMILIES 
NEED HOUSEHOLD GOODSM 
CLOTHES, or CASH 
DONATIONS. Call (708) 
872-9016 or (708)623-3681 lor 
Informallon. 




Lost & Found 



ARE YOU THAT Good 
Samarltlan who FOUND 
someones PET or special lost 
Articte? Call Lakeland Classified, 
and gel results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(708)223-8161. 

FOUND1 BLACK CAT, Vicinity 

of AllansonlnMundeloln, Call to . 
Identify. (708) 566-2654. 

LOVING GRAY CAT, Beautiful 
SEMI-LONG HAIR. Mate. Found 
end of August. VkJnly of Anlioch, 
Deep Lake Rd. For ADOPTION: 
Call (708) 395-4206. delalts. 

FOUND: BLACK MALE CAT, 

green eyes, very tovabto. hgtesfcte 
area. 9/20. (708) 740-7903. 

FOUND: REDDISH SHORT 

HAIR female dog, Wadsworth 
area. Call to Identity, (708) 
244-6969. 

FOUND: YOUNG FEMALE 
HUSKY-TYPE dog, vicinity ol 
Rrverwoods, off PortWIne Rd. 
Call to Identify (708) 945-0538. 



LONELY7 WE WEREN'T 

CREATED TO BE ALONE. 
Singles Cfub, Free application. 
Send S.A.S.E. to The Club, 
P.O.BOX 67, Zion, IL 60099. 

ADOPTION- BECAUSE YOU 

CARE: Our shared pain can 
become shared happiness. Your 
very difficult situation can be 
solved by ours. Alow us to adopt 
your baby. Financially secure 
elementary teacher and 
accountant wit be loving, devoted 
parents. We will give your baby 
a life of love, security, and 
knowledge of a birth mother who 
made a loving unselfish choice. 
Medicaljegal cousellng, and 
court approved expenses paid. 
Confidential. Please call our 
attorney at (708)957-6643. 

ADOPTION- PROFESSIONAL 
COUPLE unable to have our 
own child. We would love to 
adopt an Infant to share our life. 
Have home in a wooded area with 
tots ot neighborhood children, 
good schools, relatives and 
friends who have also adopted 
children and a loving and 
. supportive extended family. Call 
usalourhomeToll-Free 1/800- 
377-1602 Aviva/Lee. 

ADOPTION: WE ARE LOOKING 
to adopt a baby. We are a couple 
In our eaity 30*3 ottering a loving, 
stable and nurturing environment 
with financial security. CAN YOU 
HELP US1 Susan and Kevin. 
Call our Attorney, Jack Rlchlman 
collect (708)223-1500. 



$2,500 CHARGE CARD! 

Guaranteed ua me day 

approval I Also qualify Tor 

NO deposit Major Bank 

Card & cash advances. 

1-80O.737.1000 Ext 3127 




Free 



SPRING CLEANING77 FREE 
AND GIVEAWAY ITEMS CAN 
RUN HERE AT NO CHARGEI 
(We discourage any pet ads) 
CALL TODAY. (708) 223-6161. 

FREE FIREWOOD. 633 
LAKESHORE BLVD. 

WAUCONDA. 1/2 mile north ot 
Rt.176. U-haul ft away. (708) 
980-4797. 



■BBHEBEEEEEB 

S DON'T § 
I CALL | 

B Unless you want ton 
H know your future. H 
E l on 1 live psychic E 
E Your future revealed E 
'3 Love, Health, Wealth E 

5 1-900-737-1818 5 

B Ext. 805 b 

B $2.98 per min. B 

B 18 or older, B 

B entertainment only b 

■EEEEEEEBEEB 



fpj¥Bm5R»¥(<jjjjTWijiTnjyj™«jjw 



EMPLOYMENT 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



APARTMENT COMPLEX 
MANAGER- To live-In and 
maintain building. Must be 
personable, articulate and 
responsible with people and 
technical sWls. Couple preferred. 
Call (708)615-9717. 

EASY MONEY- 
TELEMARKETING. No 
experience necessary, will train. 
Part-time evenings, and 
Saturdays, $5.00/hr. Minimum 
ot 16yr.old. Call Troy after 3pm. 
(708) 918-7734. " 

FRIENDLY HOME PARTIES 
now has openings for 
demonstrators. No cash 
Investment. Part-time hours will 
tun lime pay. Two catalogs, over 
700 Items. Can 1/800-4B8-4875. 



NEED 50 CANDIDATES. 
Incredble Weight Loss Program, 
NO WILL POWER NEEDED. 
Just Patented. 100% Natural & 
Guaranteed. 'Doctor 

recommended. Passed 2yr. 
Medical Study. (503) 727-3569. 

I PART TIMES 
I HOSTESS a 

i New home builder ! 

" weekends. 
Excellent hourly pay. m 

, Please Call Lois § 

|(815) 675-6664 § 

Tea nana BOJoaioaiQar 




I DRIVER S 
t RETIREES I 

S Fan Time % 

J Needed for J 
• Catering Company • 

i (708) 356^7513 i 

8am - 4pm • 
Lake Villa S 



Receptionist 

ORTHODONTIC 
OFFICE 

Duty Ortho office hat 
opening for P/T recep- 
tionist, 3 daya per wk. 
Muil poatest good com- 
munication, computer, 
typing, & organization 
akilla. A poaitive attitude 
and ability to work well 
with people, Noo-amok- 
Ing office. Call Chrit 

(815) 344-2840 



nrnTTimwp^wf^wiTTTTTPmTjpwf^ 



TrT. , . l, .Tr , T. , J. , J. 1 . L -.-.l. , .'.| 



EMPLOYMENT 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



"MANAGEMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES" 

Prtmerica Financial Services ta 
looking for motivated people 
who want positions In upper 
management. Full or Port 

Time. Training provided. 

Contact Kirk Col try 
(708) 473-9953 




HELP WANTED 

AFTERNOONS 

CAR PORTER 

Call Tom 

(708)680-7001 

ENTERPRISE 
RENT-A-CAR 




EARN GASH 
NIGHTLY! 

$7.00-13.00/hr. 




Domino's 

Pizza Delivery 

at Liber tyville 

(708) 367-6200 



PM Dishwasher| 

THE COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY seeks a person to 
do assigned duties Including 
waiting on customers. 

NORMAL HOURS: 3pm 
to 9pm Monday thru 
Thursday. 

FOR APPLICATION form 
or mora information, contact 
Personnel at 708/223-6601 
exi. 2216 (TDD No. for hear- 
ing Impaired Is 708/223- 
5615). 

COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY, 19351 W. 
Washington, Grayslake, IL 
60030-1198 (e.o.e./a.a.; 
women and minorities 
encouraged to apply) 



Substitute 

Teachers 

Needed 

Mln. $60.00 per day 

flOUnD LRHE 
ARffl SCHOOLS 

Dist116 
Call Donna at 

546-5522 



Part Time 
MAELROOM 

Thursdays in our 
Grayslake office. 
Perfect for retirees, 
married couples or 
someone wanting 
to pick up a little 
extra money. Call 
Bob Schroeder. 

(708)223-8161 
(800)442-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



; retail sales; 

I Part lime poahlon tor retail , 
'lumbar building materials 
'& home Improvement ' 
IibIob, Day, evening &l 
I weekend hour* available.) 
1 Ideal lor retlrass or col-, 
legs atudenta. No oxp. 
• necessary. Wit train. ' 

! HILL B EH AN! 
! LUMBER CO. J 

538 N. Morris Ave. 

Mundelein, IL 

1 See Nlatl Judge or , 

1 Dave Finch , 



ADVERTISING 
COORDINATOR 

Great opportunity for the 
multi-talented person. 
Never a dull moment! Part 
time, flexible hours 
Approx. 22-25 hours per 
week. Duties to include: 
outside sales territory 
back-up, typesetting, ad 
layout and design, special 
section promotional coor- 
dination, national account 
sales, light telemarketing, 
trade show participation 
and general office coordi- 
nation. Candidate must be 
organized, responsible, 
assertive and be able to 
handle a multitude of 
tasks. Could work into a 
full time position. 

For interview 
appointment call 
Jill DePasquale at 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 



fire you burned out at 
your current job ? 




Come Join us at Lakeland Newspapers. We 
have positions available In telemarketing - 
experienced or will train the right people. 

We offer: 

•A pleasant work environment 
♦Good hourly pay 
•Commissions 

Contact Nigel at 708-223-8 1 6 1 



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Homes For Sale 



Homes For Sale 



Homes For Sale 




I 



Homes For Sale 



IilTCHaS 

That 
Really 
Cook! 







GAS 

HOMES 

FREE APPLIANCES 

111 Your MEW Wan saw Home... 

| If you order a new home before November 22, 1993, you 
can get a new GE range, refrigerator, and dishwasher 
| absolutely free. . . 

Homes On Your All our homes are constructed 
^SiS*^^ using these Brand Names. 

057,900 

SCHLAGE [SUriUU *&Ux*X»aPacmc KOHLER 
GhTHOMXS EL 

A w 




Cj QUPBE TT 



Armstrong 



UNITED STATES QYPSUM fflTOlHTffll 

.VMonsftekf 



"uaMCifBDUn 



COUNTY LINE 



216 Janet Drive 

Island Lake 

708-526-8306 



TRIPLE "J* 



H 



34390 N. Rte. 45 

Lake villa 

708-223-7900 



BY OWNER- ANTIOCH- Price 
Reduced) Under market value, 
can close ASAP! 4-yoar old 3* 
large bedroom custom Colonial, 
on wooded cuf-du-sac acre. 2-1/2 
bath, cathedral celling In great 
room, fireplace, full basement, 
2, 300sq.lt. Excellent schools. 
Seller MOTIVATED! $199,500 
(708) 587-0035. NO REALTORS, 
Please. 

CRYSTAL LAKE- 0EAL 
DIRECT WrTH BUILDER! Cedar 
2-story, 2-bedroom, 2.5-balhs, 
fireplace, deck, Jacuzzi, central 
air, energy efficient. River rights. 
DRY basement has potential. 
$129.900. (708) 526-8306. 

BY OWNERl LOVELY large 5- 
bedroom In Oary: 2-fuD baths, 
fireplace, fenced yard, nicety 
decorated on 'friendly cul-de- 
sac" $146,000 (708)516-3513. 



BUILD YOUR OWN HOME 
NOWII NO downpayment on 
Miles materials, below market 
construction financing. Can Mies 
Homes today. 1/BO0-343-2884. 
ext.T. 

BY OWNER- $124,900 Brick 
ranch. Round Lake, 3-bedrooms, 
1-1/2 bams on l/3acra lot. (708) 
740-9515 for showing. 

BY OWNER- 3-BEDROOM 2- 

BATH Cape cod, +garago on 
Crooked Lake. $97,000. Call 
after 6pm. (815)337-3231, 

BY OWNER- 802 OEFFLINQ 
DR. Johnsburg.OPEN HOUSE 
SAT. 10/2, and SUNDAY 10/3 
9am-4pra Charming 2-bedroom 
home with 2-car garage. Large 
landscaped lot. Quiet 
neighborhood; $89,500 (815) 
344-0075. 



BARRINGTON VILLAGE- NEW 
Construction from foundation 
upl 3-bedroom, 2-1/2 baths, 
lower level, walk-out recreation 
room, $239,900 S. Fleming, 
Broker. (708) 228-1620. 

BRICK RANCH WITH 3- 

bedroom, 2*1/2baths, centra) air, 
2-I (replaces, paneled basement 
with wet bar, and Berber 
carpeting. Located on cul-de- 
sac, with bto access and private 
beach on Grayslake. $215,000 
(708)223-0552. *-..■ 

WAUCONDA BY OWNER. 

newer end-unit townhome. Very 
private adjacent lo wooded forest 
preserve. 2-bedroom, 2.5 bath, 
full basement, deck and patio, 
2.5car garage, fireplace In IMng 
room. MUST SEE, Must seOH 
Mo ve- In condlbn. Lower 5 1 20a 
(708) 528-0798. 



TWIN LAKES- EASY location, 
close to Richmond lust oft RL12. 
3-bedroom, 1-balh, large living 
room and driing rooms, hartfwood 
floors, new appliances, new 
90+lumace with central air, new 
wel and softener. Many upgrades. 
2-car detached garage and 
16x24(1. storage building with 
freezer. On 2-1 /8 acres ot newly 
landscaped, partially wooded 
with Irutt trees. Includes farm 
tractor with mower. $121,500 
Make offer. (414) 279-8988. 
anytime. 

SPRING GROVE- COUNTRY 
style home with covered front 
porch on over 1/2-acre. 3- 
bedroom, 3-1/2 bath, finished 
basemen*, hardwood floors, oak 
stairs, whlrtoool tub, balcony In 
master suite. Only 2yrs. old, 
$189,900(815)675-2116. 

BY OWNER- ROUND LAKE 
BEACH. 3-bedroom Ranch, 1- 
bath, comer lot. $73,000 (708) 
740-0198. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER- 4- 
bedroom, BHevet home, kitchen, 
dining area, living room, family 
room, 2-full baths, central air, 
2-i/2car attached garage, located 
In Burlington, near schools. 
$129,500 (414) 763-2053. No 
Realtors! 

FOR SALE- TWIN Lakes. Wise. 
Newly constructed 3-bedroom 
townhome with attached 2-car 
garage each sldo. Phone after 
Spm. (414) 763-7171. 

FOX LAKE- COZY 2-bedroom. 
1-bath home, nestled among 
mature trees, boasting Is perenial 
filed 50x245 bt. $88,500. Call for 

appolnlmont (708) 587-5210. 

GURNEE- 1992 3-BEDROOM 2- 
1/2 bath Colonial. Brick and 
aluminum on cul-de-sac near 
park. Fireplace, master bath, 
central air, full basement, 2-story 
foyer. Cedar fence and custom 
deck on large tot. $159,900 (708) 
"\ 360-1145 or (708)470-5192, 
v days. 

GURNEE- TRI-LEVEL 
REMODELED 3-bedroom, 1- 
1/2bath, targe fenced yard, 2- 
1/2 car garage. $125,000 (708) * 
356-2236. 

GURNEE/ GRANDWOOD 
PARK By Owner. Extended 
Ranch. This house Is a 10+. 
Large screened-(n sun porch, 

lots of cabinets, newly romodeiod 
r Idlchen wl h breakfast bar. celling 
fans, 2-3 bedrooms, 1-1/2 bath3, 
2.S car garage. Bus pick-up for 
Ourneo schools at corner. 
Beautiful- yard. Great 
neighborhood Move-In condrtSon. 
$112,000(708)265-1130. 

HOUSE FOR SALE- ^bedroom 
2-balh. Owner finance possble 
$85,900 (708) 272-8854. 



Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 39 



■^ 



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EMPLOYMENT 




Help Wanted 
Part-Timo 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



General Ottlce 

SALES 

SUPPORT 

Part-time 
M-F/1 :00-6:30 p.m. 

Inlrupa Manufacturing Co. has a 
part-time opening avail, (or a 
highly organized Sales Support 
Person. You will prepare paper 



work lor shlpmeniB, keypunch 
and provide general clorcal (unc- 
tions. To quality, a high school 
diploma/equivalent, basic general 
olllco oxporlonco and good typing 
skills are required. 
Inloresled candidates may apply 
In person from 8am - 5pm at: 

INTRUPA 
MANUFACTURING 

95 S. Route 83 
Grayslake, tl 60030 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



GENERAL OFFICE 

RECEPTION 

Light office and phones 

Wauconda 
(708) 526-5055 






DIRECT 
CARE 

Immediate P/T open- 
ings In our residential 
home for autistic 
teens, located In 
Gurnee/Waukcgan 
area. 1st Shift 
Weekends. You will be 
paid for all training. 
Must have valid, dri- 
ver's license and be 
21+. Start $6.03/hour 
with excellent-bene- 
fits. Call Supervisor at 

(708) 263-0097 

EOE 



Customer Service 

Seasonal Positions 

Part-Time Days & Evenings 

What's In It 

For You? 

There's more than groat merchan- 
dise In Ihe JCPonnoy Fall & 
Winter catalog - thoro's plenty ol 
opportunity, tool With an Increas- 
ing share ol customors, wo have 
outstanding positions lor bright, 
courteous individuals to success- 
fully service Incoming catalog 
orders. Waolfor: 
*«.98/Hr. to Start 
•Automatic Pay Increases 
'Paid Training 
'Paid Holidays 
•Merchandise Discounts 
Classes Begin October 1 1 

Take advantage of professional 
training, then choose Irom variable 
daytime hours between opening to 
5:00 p.m. or evonlngs between 
3:00 p.m. to close: Somo week- 
ends are roqulred. Hours may lluc- 
luato with call volume. Those post 
lions also oiler groat potential tor 
continued employment. 

So, II you thought our catalog only 
holds lashlon & value, ihlnkcgalnl 
Apply in person weekdays 8:30 
am. - 430 p.m. or call: 

708-459-2900 

JCPenney 

Telephone Sate Center 

1120 Lake Cook Rd. 

(1 block east of Arlington Kts RdL) 
Buffalo Grove, IL 

EOE M/F/D/V 



YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



RECEPTIONIST/ 
General Office 

'Energetic person wanted for casual office, part 4 
[time Mon.-Fri. Duties include busy phones,, 
.Mac computers (will train), and general duties. 
►Attention to detail a must. Call John Janicki,' 
'10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at (708) 949-4900 or apply at} 
[UPSTAGING, 909 Tower Rd., Mundelein, IL. 

* EARST EXTRA 

* HOOD AY CASH! 

J 10 Positions Available 

Full tLme.beneD.ts, all holidays ofl", all shifte 
* available. Flexible hours. Many positions to 
*. offer. Great opportunity for growth. Call 

$ (708) 615-3110 



4 

A 

A 
4 
A 
4 
A 

A 



Tuesday Morning Incorporated, a gift and 
home accessory store is opening a new store 
in Lake Zurich. We are now accepting applica- 
tions for P/T employees. We need enthusiastic 
people with a positive attitude to work in a 
fast-paced and ever-changing environment. 

Please apply in person beginning JO/4/93 

217 S. Rand Rd. 

Lake Zurich, IL 

(708) 550-1628 



COME JOIN A 
WINNING TEAM! 

Experienced people needed for part time work 
in our office. Pleasant work environment, good 

starting salary and commission. 

To schedule an Interview call Nigel at 

(708) 223-8161 




D 
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Lakeland 
Wi — 


■■ 
1SID " 
BOB SS 
■ (9(1 ■■ 

■aa.55 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS-. TAKE A Turn For 
The Betler... Top Pay, miles, 
and rospect Irom a company 
thai puts people first. Call: 1/800- 
423-7629 MUNSON 

TRANSPORTATION, EOE. 



LICENSED LIFE A Hoalh Agert 
needed. Quality products, Nigh 
commissions win advance before 
Issue, lead system, and benefits. 
(Musi qualify for advances and 
benefits) Call (1/800)252-2581 . 



Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



TRUCK DRIVERS- 

OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY 
FOR single and team drive rsl 
Top pay package and bonuses, 
guaranteed home llome, health, 
dental and life Insurance plus 
401K plan. Must havo 2-yrs. 
OTR drMng experienced. RakJers 
Express, Alloona, Iowa. Call 
24hrs. 1/800-262-1852. 

COVENANT TRANSPORT. THE 
Road to Your Future. Last year 
our top loam earned over 
585,000 * Starting at .270 to 
.29$ per mile with plus bonuses 
to .38« per mile 'Paid Insurance 
•Motel, layover pay Loading/ 
Unloading pay 'Vacation, 
deadhead pay Requirements 
•ago 23 *1yr. verifiable over-the- 
road 'Class A CDL with 
Hazardous Materials. 1/800-441- 
4394. 

■ DRIVERS- ADDING 300 New 
Trucks- Hiring: Shonhaul, OTR 
and contractors. Outstanding 
pay/benefits, sign-on bonuses, 
assigned trucks. Call Anyllme- 
BURL1NGTON MOTOR 
CARRIERS: Call 1/BOO/JOIN- 
BMC, exl 105, EOE. 

TRUCK DRIVERS/CDL 
HOLDERS- DART Transit offers 
outstanding opportunities for 
owner operators and fleet drivers. 
Fast cash. Leaso-to-buy programs 
available. Call 24hrs. 1/B0O-366- 
3278, Depl. X-4. 

WANTED: 100~PEOPLE TO 
LOSE WEIGHT) NO WILL 
POWER REQUIRED. BRAND 
NEW, JUST PATENTED. ALL 
NATURAL. DOCTOR 

RECOMMENDED PRODUCT 
100% GUARANTEED. CALL 
DEBBIE Today 1/800-864-0144. 

OWNER OPERATORSl WE 
otter: Top pay, Weekly 
Settlements, 4 to 6 days runs, 
Dedicated Service, backhauls 
and Insurance Packages. 
Interested? Contact Carol Bennett 
at 800/373-3142. 

DRIVERS: (OTR) J.B.HUNT. 

Do You Want better PAY? Do 
You Want More Miles? Then 
Call J.B.Hunt: 1/800-845-2197. 
It you have a CDL cal 1/800-368- 
8538 'Training available for 
Inexperienced drivers. EOE/ 
Subject to Drug Screen. 



DRIVERS 

Local delivery. Small car 
St insurance necessary. 

Apply 
402 N. Seymour 

Mundelein 



delivery 

Independent delivery contractors 
wanted for weekly delivery of peri- 
odicals to retail establishments. 
Requires a reliable, insured, Irg 
Auto/Mi niVan or Van & valid dri- 
vers license. Excoll. revenue 
potential. For further info, call 

708-430-1589 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 
$35,000 potential. 

Details. Call 
(1) 805-962-8000 

ExtB-4458 



Ron & Brians 

Suzuki of Waukegan 
Experienced, conscien- 
tious person for Parts & 
Accessories Sales. Must 
also have experience/ 
working knowledge with 
computers. 

(708) 623-2004 



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3 RIGBV'S RESTAURANT » 
fl 1910 £ Grand Ave. p 

> Lindcnhurst 

3 (708) 356-4440 or g 
S (708) 356-4441 « 
lj Ask for Pete or Bessy 
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L 



RESTAURANT 
HELP 

Now accepting applica- 
tions for Full or Part 
Time Food Sorvcra 
AM/PM. Experience pre- 
ferred but not ncccsBory. 
Apply in person 
Monday-Friday 
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM 

Parkside Cafe 

5572 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 

(708) 662-2929 



BANKING 

TELLERS 

Friendly and profes- 
sional atmosphere!! 
The First Bank of 
Highland Park is 
looking for energized, 
team-players with 
one year cash han- 
dling experience and 
quality customer ser 
vice skills. Previous 
teller experience is a 
plus! All interested 
applicants should 
contact Deb Elliott at 

(708) 432-7800 

EOE 



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GENERAL 
FACTORY 

I st & 2nd Shifts 

Transformer mfgr. needs men & women lor assembly, 
inspection, and packing assignments. We need energetic, 
sell-starters & team playcrsl 

•4 Day - 40 Hour Work Week, Mon-Thurs. 

•Life, Health & Dental Benefits 

•401 K Retirement Plan 

•Paid Vacation & Holidays 

Apply in Person To: 

ACTOWN ELECTROCOIL 

2414 Hlghvlew St. Spring Grove, IL 60081 
(815)675-6641 



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ADVERTISING SALES 

Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly 
newspaper group, is seeking an Advertising Account 
Executive. The candidate will be responsible for field 
sales calls, developing a key area in Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills in Interpersonal 
communication, creativity and personal responsibility. 
The carKfdate must also be self motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy 
variety and be able to handle multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile Is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professional, energetic and pos- 
sess al of the above characteristics we are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A candidate should have previ- 
ous sales experience. Please send resume or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, H, 60030 

(708) 223-8161 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



SEEKING LAKE 
COUNTY JOBS? 

We can holpl Permanent 
onlyl All types! No tomps. 

ACCURATE 

(708)244-2511 



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HOUSE 
INSPECTION JOB 

S7S0Avkty 

Your area. Will train. 
For info, call 

219-922-7118 Htm387 

=fl 7 days SSp.ttu fr; 



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E Paid gas, call \[ 

g (708) 272-1747 fj 

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HVAC/SHEET 

■ METAL INSTALLER- 

Northern Lake 

5 County Area - Pay J 

i rat© subject to to | 

experience. 

■ Call: (708) 265-1400 \ 

\ and osk for Bruce 5 



Supervisor Trainee 

Days & Evening? 
plus weekends. 

Also part-time positions avail. 

Hex hrs.- Apply wlihln 

W.H. Smith 

Convenience Store 

295 Bradley Rd. UbertyWlle 

Open 6:00-1 0:00 pm 

(708) 295-2770 



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1 CASHIER audi 
I MANAGERS I 
j ASSISTANT | 

1*Higii Starting Wage| 

=*PnoFrrSiiAniNG 
|*Healtii Insurance | 

| Learn convenience | 
| store business 

| Apply at 

1 (^untkvside 1 
ICitgo Mini-Mart! 

f RL 03 and Midlothian Rd. 1 

I Phillips 66 

I IN. Rand Rd. '§ 
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PROGRAM 
COORDINATOR II 

The Northeast Illinois 
Regional Commuter 
Railroad Corporation/Metra, 
the Corporation responsible 
for commuter rail activities 
in Northeast Illinois, Is cur- 
rently seeking a qualified 
candidate to fill an immedi- 
ate vacancy for a Program 
Coordinator II. 

Under the supervision o 
the Senior Program 
Coordinator In the Grant 
Development and 

Programming Department, 
will be responsible for 
developing criteria and 
evaluating projects consid- 
ered for Inclusion in the 
capital program. Prepares 
documentation and devel 
ops project element 
descriptions; conducts and 
Implements technical stud- 
ies as needed. Designs 
programs and enters and 
verifies data on the person- 
al computer. 

Minimum qualifications 
Include a Bachelor's 
degree (or equivalent) with 
special courses In statis- 
tics, accounting, planning. 
Must have good communi- 
cation skills (verbal and 
written) and prior experi- 
ence in developing grant 
programs. 

Position provides excellent 
compensation and benefits. 
Please send resume 
Including salary history and 
requirements to: 

Director 
Office of Employment 

METRA 

547 West Jackson Blvd. 
Chicago, IL 60661 

Minority candidates are 

oncouraged to apply. 

EGEM/F/DAf 




Kelp Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
FuH-Time 



Tl 



EXPERIENCED 
WJtITSTAFF 

Luncheon S evenings 
Phone (708)662-3610 



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POSTAL JOBS| 

$11.78-$l4.90/hr. 

plus benefits. Form application I 

6 information toll 

219-922-7117 ert P25»7 

7 days- 8-8 pM. 



PACKERS 
ASSEMBLERS 

WAREHOUSE WORKERS 

Long a thai Iwm Job* oviilablo Am Lake 

Co «n Tfwr.p to pe™ poisibiUbe*. 

hour (Mill, i diy» • w«ek or 12 hour 

ihiin, 3 diyi ■ week or 10 hour rtltu, 4 

d*y* ■ wwk. C*l kx ippotntmtfit 

708-362-9305 

ADIA PERSONNEL 

BOO S. MlwatAoa Ave., Suits 10 1 

uberlyvUo.ll. 60048 



MECHANIC 
NEEDED 

For gas St diesel equipment 
Call 

(708) 526-0858 



STORE CLERKS 
NEEDED! 

Wauconda Location 
Antioch Location 
Apply In Person 

\BRANSNUTCO.] 

581 Bonner Rd. 

Wauconda 

Between 9-12 p.m. 

(708) 526-0700 



S FULLTIME | 
MECHANIC 

H Must hove experience Jg 

2? wlfh Diagnostic '« 
- Analyzer Computer, irt 

BGood Benefit Pockooe \V 
Apply within 

j A Tire County Service J 

B363 N. Cedar Lake Rd. u 
Round Lake 



RETAIL 
SALES 

Seasonal Christmas help. 
Manager, full & part time 

sales clerks nooded. 
Good handwriting a must. 

CURMEE MILLS 

(414)422-1436 



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Operators g 

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B Top Pay -Paid Fuel n 
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3(708) 272-1886 g 

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• SUPERIOR • 
OPPORTUNITIES!!! 

* General Office To $16,000 

* Telemarketing To $1 5,600 

* Data Entry. To $16,000 

* Jr. Account Receivables ...To $17,000 

* Support Clerk To $18,000 

* Dental Assistant To $19,000 

iperior Jbcrsonncl 




How To 

Stirvive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Q: Dear.. .Search: I started working for a company a couple 
of weeks ago where everyone takes their morning and 
afternoon breaks at the same lime. I was approved to start 
my work day one hour later than the normal work day as I 
need to get my children off on the school bus. I realize that 
is a "perk", however, I was approached by my immediate 
supervisor and told that I am not eligible for break times as 
arc my co-workers. I thought thai it was a federal law that a 
company is required to give a morning break and an 
afternoon break besides a lunch. My former employers 
always complied with that. Have things changed over the 
last few years? R.S. - Libcrtyviilc 

Al Dear R.S. "Breaks" are not a federal requirement but 
rather a state law which with most, slates that employees be 
allowed a paid break of ten minutes for each lour hours 
worked consecutively. As for lunch breaks, it is also not 
required of an employer to pay for meal time if the time 
allowed is at least a half-hour. 'Ihe exception of course is if 
there is an emergency situation that requires the employee to 
stay at their work area. These arc usually situations as 
needing to keep telephone coverage, computer coverage and 
such situations where your employer expects you to stay at 
your work station. In these situations where it has been 
required, the employer must then pay the employee for meal 
time. In your situation you must understand that your 
employer has made a concession to allow ^ou to come in 
later than other employees due to your situation and yes, that 
is a "perk". For them to ask you not to lake morning and 
afternoon breaks, should be accepted by you. It is quite 
possible that other employees have recognized that you do 
nave a special schedule and this may have been brought to 
the employer's attention. Your ability to start work later than 
other employees is a good situation that should be weighed 
against a ten minute morning and afternoon break. You may 
not t find that in another employer. I'd let it be and accept 
their request as is. Good luck I 

Note Ui'our Lakeland readers: Wc arc asking that you 
participate in a survey wc arc conducting by wriung me and 
telling mc the techniques your company uses to motivate its 
employees in different situations. These motivational ideas 
can range from special bonuses. ..group rep sessions. ..or 
planned seminars. All letters will be acknowledged and kept 
confidential. Thank you in advance for your participation. 
Send to: Nancy Sakol c/o Superior Personnel, Inc. 5101 
Washington St., Gumcc, IL 60031. 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gumcc. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 5101 Washington St., 
Gumcc, IL 60031. 



40 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



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EMPLOYMENT 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Help Wanted 
• Full-Time 



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MEDICAL OPPORTUNITIES 



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Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



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Ron & Brians 

Suzuki of Waukegan 

Reliable person to 
answer phones-arid 
do light filing on 
Saturdays., 
(708) 623-2004 



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Start Today! 

No experience 
necessary 

Earn $200-3400 
per week. 

MUNDELEIN 



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FACTORY 
WORKER 

Dependable person, 
good math & verbal 
skills. High school 
degree required. 

Excellent Benefits 
-Gumee Location- 
Call: 

(708) 263-3500 
ext.11 

Please leave message 



SECURITY 



Positions available for 
self-motivated indfvldu 
als. Qualified applicants 
must be 21 and have valid 
drivers license and good 
communication skills 
Must be able to work flex- 
ible shifts. Benefit pack- 
age available. 

Apply in person 

LAKEHDRSTMALL 
MAIN OFFICE 

199 Lakehurst Rd. 
Waukegan 

M/F EOE ADA 




\ 

4 

5 



Immediate 

Full/Part-time 

Openings 

•Waiter/Waitress 
•Cashiers 'Hostesses 
•Cooks •Dishwashers 

Experienced or wc will train 
Must be 18 or over to apply 

-Apply in Person- 

Mon-Fri 
8:30am - 5pm 

1-94 and Grand Ave. 
Gurnee 

EOEM/F 



y *>*+■ 



Food Service 
Worker 

THE COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY seeks an Individ- 
ual (or a Full-Time 
Temporary position, doing 
food preparation which 
ncludes making subs and 
pizzas and walling on cus 
tomers. 

CASHIERING experience 
Is preferred. 

NORMAL HOURS are 
6:30am to 3pm Monday thru 
Friday with some Saturdays 

COMPLETED application 
must bo submitted to 
Personnel, For application 
form or more Information, 
contact Personnel at 
708/223-6601 oxt. 2216 
(TDD No. tor hearing 
impaired Is 708/223-561 5). 

COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY, 19351 W. 
Washington, Grayslako, IL 
60030-1198 (e.o.o./a.a.; 
women and minorities 
encouraged to apply) 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



UTILITY 

COMPANY 

JOBS 

$8.25-$15.7B/hour 
this area. Men and 
women needed. No 
experience necessary. 
For information call 

1-219-7364715 

£xt.TJ9509 

8am -8pm -7 days 



KING 



In 
Fox Lake 

NOW HIRING! 

Full or Part Time 
Closing Shift 

Hours Can Work 
Around School Schedule 

Call 
(708) 587-1414 

To Set Up Interview Time 



PLASTICS 

iForeman for vacuum i 
forming department' 
taust have set-up' 
|experlence. , Send 1 
[resume or apply In 1 
person: 8:00 A.M. to 1 
5:00 P.M. at 

NU WAY SPEAKER 
PRODUCTS, INC. 

945 Anita Ave. 
Antloch, IL 60002 

• EOE 






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sLONGIIORNg 

: STEAK HOUSE i 

* Immediate Positions J 

Available - 

tj Accepting applications^ 

■ for professional expc-J 
^rienced wah-alnff &p 

■ bartcnderi, Thoseg 

Bwho are organized, g 
courteous & commit-l 
Btcd to icrving thc> 
'public with a friendly! 
gimilc & attitude arcpj 

■ welcome to apply: J 



PRODUCTION 
SUPERVISOR 

Hands-on production 
supervisor needed for 
our felting depart- 
ment. Mechanical 
aptitude required. 
Please send resume 
or apply in person at 
Nu-Way Speaker 
Products, Inc. 945 
Anitn Ave., Antioch, 
IL 60002. 



E BUS S 
[DRIVERS 

■ for 1993-94 tchootyear ■ 

£ C.D.L. license and ' 

■ experience required. I 

jj Contact! | 

Big Hollow | 

■ School District ■ 
J (708) 587-2632 I 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 




<==^/ 



Immediate 
openings for 

Direct 

Care 

Workers 

Evening and 
Weekend hours 

only.' Full or 

Part Time. 

Willing to train 

for positions. 



CARE 

NIGHT 

SHIFT 

(0 p.in.-<> a.m.) 

Must include 

weekends 
Work wnli mvmiv- 
lv .mt! pruliiiniillv 



RN/LPN 

Immediate Part- 
Time opening 

11:30am -8 pm 

and Saturday 

Contact 

Candy Sabay 



THE RESIDENT IS 

AT THE HEART OF 

ALL WE DO! 



Please contact Sister Arkne 

(708) 438-5050 




Check this 

Section Each 

Week!! 



7 



(815) 385-9869 
Pally or Paul 



GENERIC 
ASSEMBLY 

i No experience necessary 
: 2nd shift, 4 day work week 

TURRET PUNCH 
i PRESS OPERATOR 

I (Set up and run) 
Some machine shop 
i experience required. 
iMust be able to lilt 
|100 lbs. 2nd shift, 4 
i day work week. 



Experienced I 

BRAKE PRESS I 
| OPERATORS | 

Day Shift 
Apply In Person 
No Phone Calls 

Icanernortmann coro! 







sf Apply In person, § 
| no phone calls | 

1 carter- nonrnanncofol 



11551 McCormick Ave.] 
; Mundelein, I L 60060 j 



GENERAL OFFICE/ 
BOOKKEEPING 

Looking for self- 
slarter to perform 
general office & light 
bookkeeping duties. 
Centra) Lake County 
ocation. Excellent 
salary & benefits. 
Please send resume to: 

BoxZZ 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Gray slake, IL 60030 



DENTAL 
HYGIENIST 

Immediate opening In 
busy and growing 
office. Part time hrs. 
available. Excellent 
salary. 

Please call 

Dr. Thomas Frymark 

(815)385-4140 

Johnsburg, IL 



I 



CNA'S 

Expanding 
skilled/intermediate- 
cam fealty located 
in Long Grove has 

need of CNA's 
Good Benefits/Salary 
Call Suzy M-F 

(708) 438-8275 



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iLPN'Sf 



LakelanTClassnieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



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needed for 

home health 

private duty 

in Libertyville 

area 

Please call 




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1551 McCormlck Ave. 
Mundelein, IL 60060 



PLANNING 
ANALYST 

The Northeast Illinois 
Railroad Corporation 
(Metre) fs currently seeking 
a Planning Analyst. This 
position will be to provide 
support to our Office of 
Planning & Analysis In a 
wide range of planning and 

follcy analysis projects, 
hese projects include 
evaluation of new com- 
muter rail lines, extension to 
existing fines and station 
area impacts. This Individ- 
ual will utilize skills in statis- 
tical analysis (including 
regression), travel demand 
forecasting, survey 

research, spatial analysis 
using GIS, project evalua- 
tion, and report preparation. 

Master's degree In Urban 
Planning, Civil Engineering. 
Geography, or a related field 
with emphasis In transporta- 
tion planning, or a Bachelor's 
degree plus a minimum of 
two years transportation 
plan rung experience may be 
substituted for the Master's 
degree. Familiarity with the 
fundamentals of travel 
demand forecasting and 
skills In statistical analysis, 
Including regression analysis, 
are required. Experience with 
PC and mainframe comput- 
ing environments Including a 
working knowledge of broad 
range of application software 
Is also required. Familiarity 
with transportation planning 
sofrware and the fundamen- 
tals of GIS is strongly 
desired. Excellent oral and 
written communication skills 
are a must 

Position provides excellent 
benefits with compensation 
based on qualifications as 
compared with position 
requirements. Resumes 
without salary histories 
cannot be considered. 

Director 
Office of Employment 

NIRC/METRA 

547 West Jackson Blvd. 

Chicago, IL 60661 

Minority candidates are 

encouraged to apply. 

. EOEM/F/D/V 



GENERAL 
OFFICE CLERK 

Exc. oppty for a detail ori- 
ented, reliable & conscien- 
tious Indlv. primarily 
responsible tor record 
mgmt for our consulting 
engineering firm. 1 yr. of 
office exp req. Various 
dutlee will incl. computer 
work, ewtchbrd & mail 
room relief. Some lifting & 
a valid drivers lie. req 
Competitive salary & 
benef. Please contact 
Florence Norton, 272-7400 
ext. 208 or send a resume 
or letter to: 
PERSONNEL DEFT. 

fWlSS,JANNEY,ELS1NER 

330 Pflngsten Rd. 
Norlhbrook, IL 60062 

Equal Oppty Employer WF 



INSIDE SAIAS 

Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a 
challenge? Do you thrive in a Jast 
paced, dynamic environment? If so, you 
could be the person we're looking fort 

Lakeland Newspapers ts seeking the right 
person to Join our exciting Sales 
Department. You will be a success If you 
possess good organizational skills, com- 
munication skills, and are self motivated. 
If you are looking for a rewarding career. 
Investigate this position today I 

Please send resume to 
Attn: Ann Roberts 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslakc, IL 60030 

Fax: (708) 223-8810 
Phone: (708) 223-8161 



HOUSEKEEPER WANTED 
HARRINGTON 

Experienced housekeeper needed to prepare & 
Berve variety of dally meals, laundry, make beds, 
shopping & errands. MUST HAVE CAR & VALID 
LICENSE. Supervise cleaning staff. Occassional 
overtime when parents have weekend business 
trips. Prepare various foods & serve small dinner 
parties monthly. $450-500 weekly. Send resume or 
letter, references & salary history to: 

BoxBB 
c/o Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



I 



Entry Level 

In-Between Jobs 

Changing Careers 

Tired of not being appreciated? 

GREENE & Associates is a Major National Business Telemarketing Firm. Wc have 
several openings for our Telemarketing Representative position. With our comprehen- 
sive paid training program you will gain valuable marketing skills, improved communi- 
cation ability as well as knowledge about many professions. 

You'll speak with bankers, accountants, personnel managers, attorneys and teachers. Wc 
market products that have recognized benefits to their buyers, 

*No Experience Necessary 

*Full Paid Training 

*Competitive Salary 

^Comprehensive Health/Dental Insurance 

*FuIl/Part Time — Flexible Hours 

*Incentive Programs 

*Tnition Reimbursement 

*Employee Recognition Programs 

*Great Advancement Opportunities! 

Discover why GREENE is one of Ihc largest employers in Central Lake County! You 
owe it to yourself to find out more. 

Call Sue Zickert NOW! (708) 816-2800 

GREENE 

Henry M. Greene & Associates, Inc. 




EOE M/F 



PART TIME 

ANTS & AFTERNOONS 
$7.75 Per Hour Plus Benefits 



IIO.MKMAKKKS. RKT.IKKLS tf STl'DKNTS 



Become an important part of the school tradition for children 
in Lake Bluff and Lake Forest! The nation's leader in 
transportation services has immediate part-time openings for 
individuals who are at least 2 1 years old with a good driving 
record. Convenient flexible morning and afternoon schedul- 
ing available. Consider what we offer 

•PAID TRAINING 'PAID HOLIDAYS 

•MONTHLY BONUS *CREDIT UNION 

•STOCK PURCHASE PLAN •TUITION AH) 
•COMPANY PAH) LIFE INSURANCE 
•LOW COST MEDICAL INSURANCE 

Call Today For Your Personal Interview! 

708-680-9305 
Ryder Student Transportation Services 

EOEM/F/D/V 




Friday, October 1, 1993 



lakeland Newspapers 41 



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EMPLOYMENT 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



^aamisaisniiBBiaQiBQik 

g SOCIAL g 
| SERVICE g 
| DESIGNEES 

BSocial service depart- fl 
£menl has a full timcj 
position for a Social 



B Service Designee ln« 
our expanding, longO 
Qlerm hcallh care facili-g 
gty located in LongjSj 
H Grove. Degree neccs- 
Sjsary and ability to work 
Hwiih elderly preferred. 
§ For information 
B call Marilyn at 

B (708) 438-82758 

S Between 1 0am & 5pm 3 

Monday-Friday 
^nazanatoanafaamsar 



BURGER 

KING 

CASHIERS 

Daytime help needed 

Full time/Part time 

Apply in person 

BURGER KING 

5300 Grand Ave. 

Gurnce 

Before 11:00 am or 

after 2:00 pm 

Monday-Friday 

EOE M/F 






■ i 



Village of Fox Lake 

STREET DEPT. 

Taking Applications for Maintenance 
40 hours per week 
DUTIES: Various typo of maintenance of village streets and grounds 
REQUIRES: CDL Driven License and High School Diploma 
WORK LOCATION: Maintenance Oarage: 

216 Washington, Inglcsidc 

Persons wishing to apply for the above position must fill oot an 
application and return it to STUART HOEIINE/SUPT. OFSTR. 
by October 13, 1993. 

Application forms and further information may be obtained in person 
or by mail from STUART IIOEIINE/SUFT. OF STREETS 

301 South Route 59 • Fox Lake, IL 60020 
(708) 587-8570 



SCHOOL BUS DRIVER 

Lake Villa Dist. 41 Is seeking applications for 
the position of School Bus Driver. Class B dri- 
vers license Is required. Bus driver experience 
helpful. Successful candidates will drive 2 bus 
routes. AM route begins at 7j00 and ends at 
9:00 a.m, PM route begins at 2:00 and ends at 
4:30 p.m. Starting date August 30, 1993. 
Interested persons may apply In person at: 

Lake VlUa School District 41 

131 McKinley Ave. 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 

(708) 356-2385 

EEOC. Equal Opportunity Employer 



Production 
Opportunities 

Looking for a new challenge? Looking for a 
new career? Come join the ECM team. 

Wc are a electric motor manufacturing organization 
with production facilities in Union Grove. We are seek- 
ing quality oriented individuals to grow with us. Full 
and part-lime positions arc available on 1st and 2nd 
shifts; flexible hours arc also available. Previous expe- 
rience in a manufacturing selling is a plus, but not 
required. Starting wages arc S5.38-S5.78 per hour, wilh 
a full benefit package for full lime leam members. 

ECM Motor Co. 

5211 S, Colony Ave. 

Union Grove, WI 53182 

414/878-4491 




Grocery 

HELP WANTED 

NEW STORE LOCATION! 

************************ 



piggly wiggly 




Fresh.friendlv.andclosetohome 



Applications now being accepted for 
our new Piggly Wiggly Supermarket In 
Grayslake, IL. 

Positions Available Include: 

Checkers - Stock Clerks - Night Shift 

Stockers - Baggers - Produce Clerks 

Bakery - Deli - Meat Wrappers 

Full and Part-Time Positions Available 

Competitive starting wage 

with regular increases 

Please apply in person at: 

Piggly Wiggly 

815 Center St. 
Grayslake, IL 

Mon., Tues., or. Wed, 9-6 p.m. 

Equal Opportunity Employer 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

Would you like to 
work in a beautiful 
office? We are seeking 
a customer service 
professional for a 
friendly, stable mail 
order company. Must 
have at least 2 yrs. cus- 
tomer service experi- 
ence, a friendly voice 
& excellent follow- 
through skills. Please 
send resume to: 

Joann Jordan 
U I/EVTE IlVC. 

P.O. Box 460 
Lake Bluff, IL 60044 




Business 

Opportunities 



•• A MILLION $ DEAL" AS 
Seen on CNN. Hoi, Now, Unique, 
No Competition. High Potential 
Income. Minimum Investmenl. 
59,700 Cal Now! Pat 1/800-330- 
8964. 

CLASS AUTO RESTORATtON- 
Very Well established. For sale 
or lease. 4,000sq.tl. building. 
Inground hoist, overhead hoist, 
fully equipped (or restoration 
and collision work. Owner Is 
relocating. 360,000 ol work In 
progress. (414) 653-0188. 

CONVENIENT GROCERY- 
STORE with beer license (or 
SALE; Good neighborhood 
business. $27,000 plus Inverfory, 
serious Inquiries only. Call Joe, 
{414)653-0790. 

HOME-BASED BUSINESS 
MUST have computer with 
Modem. Serious Inquiries Only 
(70S) 578-1753, OVOS. 

STORE FIXTURES- DOUBLE 
chrome dress racks, dress 
hangers, clip skirl hangers, 
shopping bags with handles, 
plastic bags. (708) 566-2090. 

TANNING- WOLFF TANNING 
BEDS, Now commercial- home 
units. From $199.00. Lamps- 
Lotions- Accessories. Monthly 
payments low as $18.00. Call 
today Free new color catalog. 
1/800-462-9197, 



OPPORTUNITY 
KNOCKS! 

Prime location al 83 & 
Lake St., Grayslake. 
Looking for someone to 
Invest in or lease our 
kitchen facility for dining 
& carry-out Pizza. 

For more information 
caitDonor'Salfyat 

(708) 548-2998 

after 1:00 p.m. 




Situations Want 



3 



SNEED EXTRA CASHS Will do 
Sevang, mending, ironing, and also 
babysitting. Live In Gavin School 
Disl. Call Joann (708) 587-3302 
anytime. 

HOUSECLEANING, HONEST 
and reliable Have references 
(414) 862-9448. 

HOUSECLEANING. I will dean 
your house OR apartment at 
reasonable rates In Central Lake 
County area. References 
available. Call Barb anytime. 
(708)223-7401. 

PERSONAL CARE NEEDED tor 
woman WEEKENDS Friday 
evenings Ihru Sunday eve. Some 
lining. Dependable person wilh 
Reliable transportation. (708) 
918-0514. 

RIDE NEEDED from Round Lake 
Park lo Palatine, Monday-Friday. 
Will share expenses. (708) 
740-3945. 




Child Care 



BABYSITTER.NEEDED- FOR 
occassional evenings and 
weekends in my Mundetoln home. 
(708) 263-6900 days or 
(708)949-0865, alter 6pm, 



i 



CHILD CARE 

Needed la your home 

PanUmc/nexlblerirs. 

Fox Lake -Forrest School Dlst 
4 year old and 6 year old 

Call Kay YWCA 
(708) 662-4418 




Child Care 



TENDER LOVING CARE for 
your sweet little angels while 
you work or play, Rollred nurse 
wth child psychology experience. 
Creative activities, slory-tlme, 
library visits, field trips. As well 
as nourishing meals/snacks. 
Loads of love and laughter. Call 
today to reserve your place in the 
FUN. (708) 746-7741. Zlon. 

WILL BABYSIT IN MY 

Ingleslde/Fox Lake HOME FOR 
WORKING MOM's, 1yr. and up. 
(708) 587-0034. ' 

LICENSED, STRUCTURED IN- 
HOME CNkfcaro. 13aJy adMttes, 

cralts, games, and meals provided 
In clean and cozy Grayslake 
home." Also botore/alter school 
care accepted. Please call (70S) 
223-3006, 

LILLIES HOME CARE- 

• OPENING FOR 3/CHILDREN, ■ 

1st shin AND 2nd shift. Full time 

only. For Info cal (708) 689-Q45G. 

MONDAY MORNING MOM'S 
OFFERS Reliable qualy care for 
Infants- Preschoolers, Insured 
monitored. (708) 497-4MOM 
(4666). 

CHILD CARE PROVIDER Round 
Lake Beach (Country Walk) 
Looking to fill part/full lime 
openings. Before and after school 
welcome. Days: Mon-Frl. 
Reasonable rales. Call Laura, 
(708)265-1419. 

CHILDCARE NEEDED: PART- 
TIME for 8-month old. Usually 
Tues. and Thurs. Bam -6pm. Must 
be somewhat flexible. Grayslake 
area. Call (708) 548-1462, 
evenings alter 6pm. 

EXPERIENCED MOTHER WILL 
care for your Infant or toddler In 
my INGLESIDE home 1/2-mlle 
off Rte.134 and Rt.12. Non- 
smoking envtromert, large lencod- 
In yard. Quiet neighborhood. 
(708) 5B7-OB33. 

STAY-AT-HOME MOM OF 2- 

preschoolers, would like to care 
for your child in my Antioch home. 
Reasonable. Wll work wlh single 
parents. (708) 395-3736, 




School/ 
Instruction 



CDL QUALIFIED IN 3-WEEKS. 
Weekend Training Available. 
Job placement assistance. Call 
NOW 1/800-332-7364. Diesel 
Driving School, Sun Prairie, WI. 



TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED 
NATIONWIDE! IF YOU NEED 
TRAINING PDI CAN HELP. 
APPROVED CDL TRAINING, 
JOB PLACEMENT 

ASSISTANCE. CLASSES 
START WEEKLY. 

PROFESSIONAL DRIVER'S 
INSTITUTE 1/800-222-1782 
(AC0267) 



DIESEL-SEMI 
CDL SCHOOL 

Refresher Training 

Available. Scholarship 

Grants/Qualified 

1-800-332-7364 
Sun Prairie, WI 



MARKET GUIDE 




Appliances 



APARTMENT SIZE 

WHIRLPOOL washerand electric 
dryer, 2yrs old. Great shape 
SSOOtoesI oflor. (70B) 587-6948. 

REFRIGERATOR, AMANA 
15CU.FT. 4 -yrs old, $550 GE 
electric stove, $250. (414) 
694-3583. 

THERMIDOR COOK TOP, 36- 
Inch 4-bumers, white, gas, 9550. 
Tappan gas range, 36- inch, now, 
$750. (708) 362-7092 




•WANTED: CRAFTERS* 
GRANT High School Cratl Fair. 
Saturday Nov. 13. 9-4pm. Call 
(708) 587-2561. 

RAYMOND ELLIS SCHOOL 

PRESENTS IT'S 2nd ANNUAL 
CRAFT And BAKE SALE- THE 
SALE WILL BE HELD on 
Saturday NOV. 13 a) Ells School 
In Round Lake Beach, 10am- 
4pm. Tables are $20/bach (9x6ft. 
space). Doors Open Sam for 
sol- up. Due to the flooding, all 
records have been lost, 
THEREFORE NO PHONE 
CALLS WILL BE MADE to 
previous participants. If you wish 
to Enter please phono TINA at 
(708)740-1208 or LAUREN 
(708)740-3549 ASAPH HOPE 
TO SEE YOU ALL THERE. 



n , ,. .>■ y-jv-.r-.. :<■:-.> > •^t r vnAAK*--it. 



-\ 



W.K-v&ftfSM 



MARKET GUIDE 



:.< » ■■■ y;f>.i.-t 




Bazaars/Crafls 



Glen Ellynjr's 

2 5TH Annual 

Craft Show 

Oct. 2nd 10-4 p.m. 

College of DuPircPJ;. bid g. on 

Puk, north of Butte didd. 

200 Booths! Crafts • 

Bake Sale • Concessions 

50* off with this id 




Business/Office 

Equipment 



DI-ARCO NO. 18 TURRET 

Punch, 18-holo sizes, $1,350. 
Whitney Jensen no29 Kick Press 
$400. Nissan 3hch Diesel Trash 
pump wiht hose connector, NDP 
30TA. Nevorbeen used $1,300. 
(815)338-8666. 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT. VOICE 
Mall System, $2,000; 18,000 
BTU spot cooler, $1,600 Metal 
deck and drafting table $450. 
Mon-Frl. 8am-5pm. Ask (or Jim, 
(708)548-1600. . 

SHARP COPIERS, LIKE NEW. 
COMPLETELY REFURBISHED 
WITH FULL WARRANTY, 
MEDIUM TO HIGH VOLUME, 
$1 ,200 -$3,500, LOW VOLUME 
$600 - $700. (708)662-8200. 




Electronics/ 

Computers 



RCA VIDEO CAMCORDER 
WITH case and battery. charger. 
Asking $900/best offer (708) 
546-2952, alter 5pm. 

SEGA CD/ GENESIS 2- 

conlrollers, Numerous games, 
$375. Call for list, Marc or Beth 
(708) B72-^»946. 




] • ii Garage/ 
Rummage Sales 



AFTER YOUR BIG Sale, and 
you stilt have things that just 
did not go.... Call LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It under 
the "FREE/Glveaways" section, 
at No Charge! (708) 223-8161. 

FRIDAY, (10/B) SATURDAY 
(10/9) AND SUNDAY (10/10) 
9am-5pm. Tools, Klchon cabinets, 
i Fans, shades, drapes, glassware 
and many more Items. 32140 
N. Harris Rd., between Rte 
120+137. Grayslake. 

MOVING SALEI FRI. & SAT., 
OCT. 1&2, 9am-3pm. Fumtlure: 
Couches, tables, stereo, chairs, 
lamps, ETC. 915 N. Lakeshore 
Dr., Round Lake Beach, off 
Woodland. 

MOVING SALEI OCT. 1.2.+3 
10am-5pml MANY ANTIQUES. 
3BN. Holly. Fox Lake, off Grand 
Ave. 

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE AND 
CRAFT SALE. Clothing, lumlure, 
toys and games, and many baby 
Hems. (10/2) SAT. 9am-5pm 
(1073)SUN 9am-3pm. 3710 Pftzen 
Rd., McHenry, off Wolngart/Bay 
Rds. 

SATURDAY. OCT.2, BAM-5PM. 
28001 W. Lakevlew Dr., North, 
Lakeland Ests. CASH ONLYI 
Aquariums, compactor, BIG mens 
clothing, Tools. MISC. 

YARD SALE- SAT Oct.2, 9am- 
..?,. Step ladder, clothing, yard 
tools, chairs, household Items, 
books, ETC. 12712 W. 28th St., 
Beach Park, ZION, oft Greenbay 
Rd. 



Bar rington Hills 

Countryside School 

Miss Fitz SALE 

Sat, Oct. 2 
8:30 am - 12:30 pm 
205W.CountylincRd. 
just west of Brinker. 
Gigantic. Thousands of 
items, clothes, house- 
wares, furniture, toys, 
baby items, sporting 
goods & morel 




Good Things 
To Eat 



APPLESI PEARSl CIDER! - 
ANDERSON FARM 

ORCHARDS. 43195 M Greenbay 
Rd. Zton. 2-mHes north of Rt.173. 
(708) 872-2918. (8:30-6pm) 
Evenings call (708) 872-7004. 




Horses & 
Tack 



2/AQHA MARES FOR SALE- 
(l)-6yr.old gray, very athletic, 
(1)-12yr. old Bay, gentle and 
kind. (708) 356-3987. 




Horses & 
Tack 



(2) BRASS HORSES HEAVY 
YET made-to- hang.tull length: 
(1) 24"x26',(1)17*x26" . Sacrifice 
lor $600 pair or. $325 each.(708) 
587-4302 

HORSES BOARDED- LET IT 
SNOWI While YOU Ride Inside 
This Wlnterl Large Box Stalls. 
105x72 lighted Indoor. Near 1-94 
and Rte. 173. Lessons also 
available (708) 838-3010, 
mornings. 

TRAILER WANTED: HORSE 

or Stock. Bumper or Gooseneck. 
Any condition. Also looking for 
Trail Horse. CASH! (414) 
593-8048. 




Households/ 
Furniture 



4-PC. LIVING ROOM set, sofa, 
love seat, recllner and ottoman. 
Good condition, $400. (708) 
740-8348. . 

BAR STOOLS, BUTCHER Block 
dining set with 4/chalrs, Antique 
sewing machine, Twin bods wilh 
mattresses, Double wicker 
headboard, Wicker chair, end 
tables, lamps, tvlng room chairs. 
(708) 549-1626. 

COUCH, LOVESEAT AND Chair, 
apartment size, brand new 
condition. Blue and while floral 
print, $800 (708) 546-9230. 

DARK PINE, MATCHED SET, 
Includes: couch, 2/chalrs, 2/end 
tables, 1 /coffee table, state blue 
upholstery, $250/complete. Call 
(708)587-1144. 

DESK WITH HUTCH AND Chair, 
$125. (708) 234-0975, Mary 
before 5pm, or (708) 356-0678, 
eves. 

DINETTE SET, WOOD 
glass/brass, $135; Playoen, 
Houdlnl $20. Fisher Price high 
chair. $35. (708) 726-0506. 

EASY CHAIR, SOFA, and 
Loveseal, Blue, mauve, and 
cream. Excellent condrtlon, must 
sell. $550. (708)B55-9047. 

EXCELLENT QUALITY 
MAHOGANY dining room set, 
4/chalrsj 3/leaves. and buffet. 
Very good condition. $1,500; 
fiorest green sectional, wilh 
sleeper, brand now mattress, 
Very good condition, $500. (708) 
634-2111. 

FOR SALE "THIS END UP" 

couch and chair, excellent 
condition. $300 or best otler. 
call after 5 pm.(708) 223-4715 

FUTURMAT COMMERICAL 
CAPPACINO MACHINE, 
ANTIQUE black board, 4 bar 
top tables, colfee grinder, 
complete shower stall, mlc. 
equlp.(70B) 566-5631 

GLASSTOP COFFEE TABLE; 
WONDER CHAIR/CAR SEAT 
BUGGY/STROLLER 
COMBINATION. (708) 356-1771 ■ 

KING SIZE WATERBED- 12- 
drawer pedestal, headboard 
has cabinets, Ights, and mirror. 
Excellent condition. $400 (70S) 
SB7-1010. ___ 

KITCHEN TABLE, 4/PADDED 
coaster chairs, $200; Credenza/ 
entertainment unit, $400/best. 
All In excellent condition, (708) 
■ 395-1363. 

MUST SELL1 TRADITIONAL 
FURNmjRE, Beautiul showroom 
condition, Wheelchair, Accorcian, 
China service, Slroller, Candy 
molds and many other Hems. 
Call (708) 838-1716, leave 
message on recorder. 

MUST SELL! RECLINERcouch. 
3-yrs. old, blue mull/earth tones. 
Recllner at each end. $250/best 
Qlfer. (70S) 740-27B9. 

NICE RECLINER COUCH. Blue 
tones, 3yrs. old. good condition. 
$200/o1fer. Must sell! (708)740- 
2789. 

PONDEROSA PINE DINING 
room set, table with 2/leaves, 
4/chalrs, buffet and hutch. Very 
good condition. Asking $600 
(708) 244-1038, leave message. 




Model 

Home 

Furniture 

Beige tweed, couch, chairs, 
tables, desk, chairs. 
$900/all or best olfor. 

Call 
(708) 367-4504 

Open Mon-Frl 9-5 p.m. 




Households/ 
Fum'rture 



SOFA, LOVESEAT SET. Hunter 
green and cranberry. $695. Dining 
Room set, Queen Anne, Cherry 
$1,695. From Builders MODEL 
HOME. (708)329-4119. 

SOFA, LOVESEAT SET. Hunter 

green and crarberry. S695. Dining 
Room set, Queen Anne, Cherry 
$1,695. From Builders MODEL 
HOME, (703)329-4119. 

TABLE AND 6/CHAIR Dinette 
set, Oak finished, $150. Sears 
compact washer/dryer, 2y rs.old 
$500 (708) 497-9341 , after 6pm. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bedroom, 
comptote $1,100 Dining room 
set, $1 ,700 Cherry. All In perfect 
condition. Must Sell! (708)855- 
0611. 

SEGA SYSTEMS 2- 

CONTROLLERS, games, SONIC 
1 &2, Little Mermaids, Spot, 
Mickey s Illusions $230 (414) 
654-5212. 



43A 



Jewelry 



DIAMONDS ARE FOREVERl 
Exquslte ladles diamond ring. 
Stones magnificently, full cut, 
by "Old World' European 
craftsman, giving almost perfect 
brilliant color. Consists of 1- 
center diamond, surrounded by 
8-others, total of 1-1/3 ct.wt. 
Very conservatively evaluated 
by co rtll led appraiser at $2,950. 
(report available) Asking $1 ,950 
lor this unique one-of-a-kind ring. 
Serious buyers wilh cerlitlod 
funds onyt Please no dealers. 
Contact Mr. Braham, (708)548- 
6450. After 8pm or weekends. 

MUST SELL! Beautiful ladles 
I4kt. yellow gold cultured pearl 
and .75 carat total weight 
Diamond ring. Appraised value 
$3,270. (CerJflcate available) 
DIAMONDS ARE WS CLARITY 
- PEARL IS 8.5mm. GREAT 
CHRISTMAS GIFT! Asking 
$2,00Q/bost reasonable offer. 
Call (708)356-5257. 6-8pm. 




Lawn/Garden 



CEDAR LAWN FURNITURE, 
Chairs double chairs- coffee and 
ond tables- swings and settoesl 
(708)473-1312, 

CRAFTSMAN RIDER, 18HP, 
44tnch cut, like new, with 4ft. 
plow and accessories, $2,000 
or wilt trade for boat. (815) 
477-2543, leave message. 




Miscellaneous 



1993 ENCYCLOPEDIA SET. 
Major Brand. New, still in box. 
Originally $1 ,200, MUST SELL! 
$295. (708) 860-0585. 

ARCADE GAMES- FULL size 
commercial amusement for your 
home, dial (708) PIN-BALL. 

ART AND DRAFTING 
SUPPLIES, $500 or best oflor. 
(708) 824M047. 

DESIGNER WEDDING DRESS 
for 5'3" 1 15b Bride. Full length, 
white, all lace with sweep train. 
Bocfce 34B all Pearl and sequin. 
Off shoulder, no sleeve, V-lronl 
and back neckline. $400 Leave 
message (708) 362-1730. 

GOLF CLUBS- LADIES clubs 
and bag, $85; MENS clubs and 
bag, $125. Golf Cart $12. (708) 
295-13B7. 

GOT A CAMPGROUND 
Membership or Ttneshare? Well 
take I! America's Most sucessf ul 
resort resale clearinghouse. Cal 
Resort Sates International. 1/800- 
423-5967 (24hrs.) 

RHEEM FURNACE 75,000 blu, 
Counlerflow gas, 4 yrs, old, $450 
or best off or (414) 862-9329, 
after 5pm. . 

SCULPTURE- LIFE-SIZE 
FEMALE ceramic statue by 
upcommlng prominent artist. 
Starting bids at $7,500. Call Eric 
for appointment at (708) 
740-2789. or leave message. 

THREADMILL, $150; 
STEPMASTER$100; 10-speed 
Huffy bike. $75; Uko new coffee 
table, $45; Twin bed, $40. (708) 
291-0832. 

TOOL BOXES- FITS Fullslze 
pickups (l)saddle, (2)skJeboxes, 
Full ladder rack, $20O/all. (708) 
740-8266, after 4:30pm. 

WEDDING DRESS- IVORY, 

beaded. Never worn, never 
altered. Paid $1 200 asking $400. 
Slzo16. (708) 939-7311, leave 
message. 

WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC 
DRYER, $50; 1978 F100 FORD 
truck, 6-cyiindor, runs good ' 
$800*est. (708) 587-1731. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE- 6-1/2 ft. 
big screen TV wtth remote, $750, 
lawn vacuum- tow behind tractor 
type, perfect tor 1/2 to 4-acres, 
$595. Exorcycle, $45. Stainless 
sleol swimming pool sand flftor, 

$195. (708)356-8209. 



42 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October!, 1993 



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MARKET GUIDE 




Pels & Supples 




Wanted To Buy 



■ ■i ^*WWT 



45A 



Medical Equip./ 
Supplies 




Pets & Supplies 



FHEE TO CHARITABLE 
ORGANIZATION. MANY PAIRS 
OF WOODEN CRUTCHES. For 
More Information call (708)526- 
8992. 




Musical 
Instruments 



CONN 80 FRENCH HORN, wtth 
case, nickel plate, $1,800 (708) 
459^4537, 

FLUTE- GEMEJNHARDT, SOLID 
Silver, mint condition, with case 
and cloanlng rod, S300/best 
(414) 878-3883. 

MUST SELL) ROCKFORD- 
FOSGATE Punch 150HD amp 
$400; 12-Inch Roddord-Fosgato 
Pro woofers, $400, Call Kevin, 
(708) 623-0217. 

PIANO- 49INCH UPRIGHT dark 
wood, good Ivories, minor repair. 
$4S0/oller. (708) 623-4623. 

SEEBUHG, 1960, JUKE BOX. 
plays 80-rscord9, completely 
restored. Play 45's. $895. (708) 
587-5165 atter 5pm. 

UPRIGHT, BUSH & GERTS 
Piano. 51-lnches high; Prairie 
style, Good condition, asking 
5200.(708)438-7001. 



BLACK LAB FEMALE, AKC, 
iO-months. Moving! Needs good 
home. $125. (708) 548-1944. 

COCKER SPANIEL, MALE, 
Butt, housebroken, lyr. excelent 
wtth children, AKC registered. 
Asking $150/best offer (414) 
880-4239. 

BETTER THAN A Kennel! 
DEPENDABLE and MATURE 
ADULTS will care for your 
DOG/Pup while you're on 
vacation. Make reservations 
early! Tender loving care and 
attention In our home. Fenced 
yard. Must be able to get along 
with other sweetheart(dog) 
residents. References and 
Reasonable. Call anytime 
(708)966-6319 Florence. 

WRINKLES, WRINKLES. 

CHINESE SHAR-PEI Pups, AKC, 
9-weeks old, (2)maJes: sable, 
vet Checked, dewclaws, 
"Affectionate and Protective of 
Home". S500/each (414) 
537-2077. . 

STUD SERVICE AKC Basset 
Hound. Excellent lines and 
'Makes Beautiful puppies' (414) 
728-8392. 



BEAUTIFUL CAT, LARGER, 

Longhaired, orange tiger, spayed 
female. Please- special caring 
Inquiries, only.- lyr. old, $20. 
Animal Protection (708)432- 
4799, PAW. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD 
PUPPIES AKC 1st SHOTS, 
WORMED, IMPORT 
BLOODLINES. EXCELLENT 
FAMILY AND PROTECTION 
BREEDING. LARGE. 
GUARANTEED. $350/each. 
(414)835-4618. 

LHASA APSO PUPPIES, AKC, 
Home raised lo make loving 
family pets. Adorable, small 
healthy, non-shedding, 
(shots/wormed /dewclaws) 6- 
wks.old $250/each. (414) 
877-9222. 

POT BELLY PIG for sale, 
$200,toest offer. (708) 740-0087. 



REGISTERED COCKER 
SPANIEL puppies, Champion 
blood, males and females, 
$200/each (414) 857-2469, after 
7pm. 



LOOKING FOR REASONABLY 

priced 4-wheeter/dlri BIKE, that 
you/I would feel safe letting a 
8-10/yr.okt ride on Farm land, 
(backyard). Under $200. Call 
after 5:30pm (708)949-0415. 

PIANOS: ANY CONDITION! 
NO OLD UPRIGHTS OVER 49- 
Inches TALL. NO ORGANS 
PLEASE. QUICK CASH5S 
(414)248-6491. 

SLOT MACHINES, JUKE 
BOXES, MUSIC BOXES, 
Nickelodeon and Cole Machines 
wanted or related parts, any 
condition. CASH! Call. 
(708)985-2742 or wrile Frank 
Zygmunt P.OB0X 542 WestmonL 
IL 60559. 

WANTED- WANTED- WANTED: 
COPY OF 1993 ATLANTIC 
MAGAZINE Cal (708)634-3O25. 

WANTED: PANTRY-TYPE 
KITCHEN cabinet/ broom closet. 
Tatl Full length (64ft.) for narrow 
wall next to (ridge (deep). 
Reasonable, or repairable. 
Prahaps you know of someone 
who has recently remodeled? 
Wood preferred. (708) 740-2789, 
leave message. 



Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 





Homes For Sale 



LAKEFRONT HOME- ON 
Crooked Lake, Lake Villa. 
Spectacular views. 2-bedroom 
older home. Woodburnlng 
fireplace, al appliances Included, 
new furnace, water heater, dryer 
pump, new electrical service. 2- 
lakefrom lots below. Ideal for 
couple $129,500 Shown by 
appointment. (706) 546-3138. 

LAKE VILLA- ON 1- 

ffl ACRE, 3 -Bedroom, 2-bath, 2- 
3^ car garage, completely 
{si professionally remodeled 

$139,900(708)356-6916. 

MCHENRY BY OWNER, custom 

built, 3- bod room ranch, 2-bath, 
£& large country kitchen. Big family 

room, living room, dlnlngroom, 
*} central air, 2/walk-out patios, 

dutch gardens, wooded lot. 2-car 

# garage. $119,900. (815) 
344-1498. 

MUNDELEIN BY OWNER- view 
apple orchard. Cambridge 
Marlowe, Large lot, 2-bedroom, 
1-1/2bath, loft, kitchen, living 
room, den, pallo, all appliances, 
many upgrades. Professionally 
landscaped. 2-l/2yrs. new. 
$145,900 (708) 566-4557. 



LINDENHURST- SUPER 
LOCATION! Priced to SELL! 
This 3-bedroom home features 
a separate dining room. A stone 
fireplace and beamed ceiling 
enhance huge family room. Large 
eat-In kitchen. NEW windows, 
NEW lighting. Celling fans In 
evoryroom. Overlzed nicely 
landscaped lot. 2-1£car attached 
garage. Call tor appointment, 
ONLY $124,900. (708) 26S0443/ 
owner. 



McHenry 

Rent or 

Rent Option 

This 4 yr. old 3 bedroom, 1 
bath ranch with full base- 
ment, 2.5 car attached 
garage on large corner lot. 
Great opportunity to get 
your own home. Long term 
lease $975/$128,000. 
Option deposit $4,800. 

I Land Management 
815^78-4334 






TWIN LAKES, Wl. (203x214.se> 




UNIQUE FENCED ONE ACRE with maluro oaks and varloly ol fruit 
trees. One story homo with finished bsmt, 3 bdroorns, lull bath, living 
room, large kitchen leads you to 12x46 deck overlooking acres of larost 
and Holds where deer tend to roam In to eat apples otfthe back trees. 
Family room (23.6x18) with fireplace, 3/4 bath, (16x11) utility additional 
(19x1 1 .6) bedroom or whatever room. Newly sided, now roof... 

$158,000 BROKER OWNED Call (414) 279-5261 






LAKE ZURICH- 3-BEDROOM, 
eat-In kitchen, large fenced yard, 
l-l/2car garage, central air, new 
appliances. $119,000. (708) 
726-Q927. 

KENOSHA COUNTY- 

WHEATLAND. 7-mlnutes from 
Lake Geneva, Twin Lakes and 
. Burlington. 2yr. new ranch on 
wooded l+acres. 4-fcedrooms, 2- 
baths, masler suite with garden 
tub. Living room with bay window 
and stone fireplace, family room, 
off Ice/den, dining room wtth butt- 
In china cabinets, large kitchen 
dinette, central air, 21x33 deck 
overlooks private setting, 2-car 
attached garage. Quality 
throughout. '$169,900 
Owner/Broker (414) 537-2849. 

TREVOR, Wl. SHARP 3- 
bedroom ranch, new carpeting, 
new kitchen and bath. VA/ FHA- 
O.K. $73.000 (708) 367-8403. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- I will 
pay you $2,500 Cash at closing 
It you buy this 7-room house 
now! $85,000. (70S) 785-9740. 

9am-11amw9pn>10pm-ONLYI 

MUST BE SOLDI Priced 
Reduced. 3-bedroom ranch, 3- 
balhs, 2-flrepIaces, remodeled 
kitchen, finished basement, 
excellent location, pool, Anlloch 
area. $176,000 (708) 395-5435 
or (708)395-221 2 ask tor John. 

NEW HOMES- 1173 and 4 189 
School SI. Silver Lake, Wl. 1 ,450 
sq.ft. ranch, 3-bedroom, master 
suite, fireplace, basement and 
garage. $124,600 OPEN HOUSE- 
- SUNDAYS. (708) 296-4179 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, Small 
cute 2-bedroom cape cod with 
finished attic, stove", rotrigeralor. 
Move-In condition. No agents 
please. $83,500. After 5pm or 
leave message (708)7400358. 



FOR SALE BY OWNER 2-story 
2,500 sq.ft. with attached 2-car 
garage ON 5/acres, large deck, 
walk-out basement 3-bedroom 
possible 4th, 3-balhs. Carpet, 
tile and hardwood floors. Asking 
$195,000(414)862-8494. 

JOHNSBURQ- 1-ACRE 
2 I 500SQ.FT. 5-bedroom, 3-bath. 
Many extras! Complete 10/15. In- 
Law unit. By Owner. $178,500. 
(708)497-4828. 

KENOSHA BY OWNER- 4002 
•7th Ave. View of Lake Michigan. 
Custom built ranch, 1500 sq.ft. 
custom decor plus 1200 sq.ft. 
professionally finished lower 
section wth exterior exl, $1 19,900 
by appointment (414)658-8384, 
or (708) 520-7410. 




Homes 
For Rent 



CRYSTAL LAKE- POSSIBLE 
RENT/BUY Option. On lull acre. 
New Deluxe brick and cedar 4- 
bedroom, 2-story with English 
basement. 3-car garage, contra) 
air, energy efficient 2x6 walls. 
Jacuzzi. Fireplace, optional river 
lotfor boat available. Many 
Upgrades- Deal Direct with 
Builder- $249,900- ($2,490/mo.) 
Similar House also under 
construction in SPRING GROVE. 
708) 526-8306. 

ROUND LAKE PARK- 2- 
BEDROOM, 1/balh. all 
appliances, on nice lot 
$650/monfh +u1Hllles. Section 8 
welcome. . (708) 740-7653. 

ANTIOCH- 3-BEDROOM 1- 
BATH split-level. Family room, 
country kitchen, yard. Lake rights. 
Oakwood Knolls. (815) 338-2759 
or (pager 0708-635-0362.) 

ANTIOCH- HOUSE RENTAL 
Cute, cozy 1 -Bedroom, totally 
remodeled. Updated. Secluded 
on waterfronl. 5650/month. (708) 
487-6161. 

CLEAN, MODERN HOUSE In 

park-like setting with fake rights 
and garage. Sliver Lake/Salem 
area. References and 2 months 
security required. Lease only. 
$775/monlh. (414)889-4921. 






m 



CENTURY 21 Sunshine I 

GET AWAY FROM IT ALLI This 2 bedroom, 1-1/2 story home 
has lake rights and a view. Large living room with stone fire- 
place. 2+ car detached garage. New septic and dock. Noods 
some work, but well worlh the effort I Great starter or weekend 

hldo-a-wayl $62,900 

$ 

HAZZLE-FREE end unit townhouse with 3 bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths. Central air. Family room. Eat-in kltchon with appliances 
and with sliders to patio. 2 car garage. Easy commuting. Close 
to Chaln-O* Lakes. Affordable at $79,900. FHA or VA 

«F # % $ 

MOVE OUT to the boonlos and en]oy fresh air, friendly folks 
and small town shopping. Antioch single family attached home. 
2 bedrooms, 2 baths. Living room with vaulted celling and 
woodburnlng fireplace. Oak trim. Central air. Kitchen appli- 
ances. Finished two-car garage. No Homeowner Association 
duos I You own the land I New commutor lino In tho worksl 
Action priced at $91 .900. 

# ;& 

GRAYSLAKE In-town. Big fenced yard for pots or kids. Easy- 
care stono and aluminum exterior. Hardwood floors. Full base- 
ment. Central air and garage. Value priced, $1 20's. 

CENTURY 21 Sunshine 
5231 Washington St. Gurnee, IL 60031 

ON WASHINGTON ACROSS FROM SIX FLAGS GREAT AMERICA 

360-9200 

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED 



ifllVlichael Lescher| 

"Your fink to the Chain" 



REMODELED 4 BEDROOM RANCH 






(708) 



In Downtown Fox Lake with new rool, siding, 
carpeting and bath. Shows like new, close to 
shopping, train and lake. Family room andi 
1/2 bath in basement. Garage with electric 
I door opener and big back yard with fruit 
I trees. Well suited lor a large family or run- 
ning business out of your home. $99,900 

; re/max advantage; 

(708) 395-3000 






SERVICE DIRECTORY ffl SI6 






Housekeeping 




;--.; Concrete/ 
Cement 




Concrete/ 
Cement 



AGGREGATE PATH) BONANZA 



: : 31 Brisk * 




^^ Artistry in Aggregate 

"The Best in the Business" 
Custom Designed Patios 
Driveways & Pool Decks 

30 years in business 
5 year guarantee 



Color Finishes 
$4,00 sq.ft." 



„ 1 Bdoil Pta Graid 

kale— $3,50 per jq.fi 



(708) 367-1944 



l»nm»m»mmm»m» t »MM»m»m»mmm»m» 



fHo"cLEANINGS 
Too Busy To Clean? I 

H Hive year botue demed on a P 
a monthly, bi-monthly or wwetly U 
J but* *t icuonablo rate* • W 
■ Excellent reforcooe* pfcwkfcd. 

Call (708) 223-1310 or 3 
2 pager *<708) 861-2212 S 



S17 



Landscaping 



CLEAttCUT LAWN SERVICES. 
Lawnmowtng, landscaping, Gutter 
' Cleaning and Installation, raWng, 
call Don. Malzahn, 1524 
MeadowBrook, Round Lake 
Beach. (708) 740-9166. 
•QUALITY AT AFFORDABLE 
PRICES!' ' 

CULLOTTA LANDSCAPING- 
ROCK GARDENS, SODDING, 
SEEDING, PLANTING, 
TRIMMING SHRUBS. AH YOUR 
LANDSCAPING NEEDS. FREE 
Estimates. (706) 272-7449. 



S23 



Moving/ 
Storage 



BASEMENT WALLS CRACKED 
or Bowed? We can Correct the 
Problem QuicJdy and Easily with 
GRIP-Tlte Wall Anchors. Call 
BIX Service at 600/541-9433. 



SI3A 



Firewood 



SI3A 



Firewood 




WAurs 

WOULD 



WOOD 
Seasoned 
Hardwoods 

Mixed Full Cord $1 35.00 

! Oak Full Cord Si 55.00 

FREE DELIVERY 

(708) 305-8801 or 
(708) 356-9364 



FIREWOOD 

Seasoned 2 yrs. 

Guaranteed to burn 

Mix Hardwoods '60 "RC. 

Oak J 65. M F.C. 

Cherry, Birch, 

Hickory »75.« F.C. 

FREE Stacking & Delivery 

Di scount o n 2 or more 

(70&) 483-9300 



^ 



M 



MOVING?? CALL BOB The 
Mover. Furniture; pianos; safes; 
restaurant equipment; Light 
machinery. LHt gate van and 
small crane trucks. PACK RAT 
Enterprise s. (706)662-1956. 

ParaLegaiy 
Typing Services 



S26 



WILL DO WORD PROCESSING, 
SPREAD SHEETS, Graphics, 
and Misc. projects In my home, 
f or smal bustnas ancttx IrtdMdua). 
No job Too Small. (706) 
587-1508. 



S45 



Trees/Planls 



SI4 



Handyman 



SI4 



Handyman 



HOME OWNERS, REALTORS 
AND INVESTORS, CALL 
FAULSTICK BUILDING 
SERVICE. (800)225-0256 pager 
#14323. Installations, repairs 
and Improve merits offered. 



PHOENIX 

Handyman Services 

Electrical, Air GondMoning, Holing, 

Carpentry & General Remodeling. 

'Excellent Workmanship at 

Reasonable Prices' 

(708) 242-9517 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 
708-526-0858 




Homos 
For Rent 



FOX LAKE CONDO- 1 -bedroom, 
attached garage, no pets. Close 
to town and train S550/month 
+secur1ty. (708) 567-4167. 

FOX LAKE- 1-BEDROOM 
house, al utllties, Ideal for 1 fnorr 
smoking adult, no pets, lake 
view, lake rights, $475/monlh. 
(312) 582-9254. 

FOX LAKE- CLEAN 2-bedroom 
house, attached garage, Nice 
In-town neighborhood. AH 
appliances. No pets. S675/morih 
+security. (708) 540-1135. 

NICE RESIDENCE 3- 

BEDROOM, attached garage, 
large fenced lot, near shopping 
and schools In excellent area- 
Round Lake Park. $695Anbnth 
-^utilities. Security: $800, 
Occupancy 10/1/93. (312) 
583-4972, 

LAKE ZURICH- 2-BEDROOM 
house, country setting, ample 
parking, on 2-acres of well 
maintained land. Quiet 
neighborhood, (708) 438-7216 
or (708)436-2433. 

ROUND LAKE PARK- Brand 
new 3-bedroom. New 
development. 5950/monlh (70S) 
740-3945, leave message. 

WADSWORTH AREA, 

BEAUTIFUL.1-BEDROOM 
house, family room, cathedral 
ceilings, basement, garage, all 
appliances. S700/morth -tutillies 
+doposit. (708) 244-0052. 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Marine Midland Mortgage Corporation 

Plaintiff Case No. 92 C 5389 

VS. Judge Undberg 

Wauconda National Bank and Trust Company 
asTAJ/T 88-127, Carol Buonincontro 
DflferKJflfU 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

(IT IS ADVISED TOAT^SeItED PARSES CONSULTTHEIR 
OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant 10 a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on November 10, 1992. 

I Stephen Nagy, Special commissioner for this court will on 

November 4, 1993 at the hour of 10:30 a.m. at the front door ol 

Lake County Courthouse, 18 North County, Waukegan, Illinois, sell 

10 ihe highest bidder for cash, the following described premises; 

2357 Old Hicks Rd. Long Grove, IL 60047 

The improvements on the property consists of single family, 
one story dwelling with an attached two car garage. 

Sale Terms; 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general axes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT bo open for inspection. 

The judgement amount was $187,606.16 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Rsher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalla. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however, under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer ts ncLrequired to provide additional Information other 
than that set forth in this notice. 



RENTAL SEARCH? 

We can helpl Hundreds 
of listings, all areas ol 
Lake County! Sec. 8 OK 

ACCURATE 

(708) 244-2511 



McHcNRy Rent 

OR 

Rent w/OptIon 

This 4 yr. old 3 bedroom, 1 
bath ranch with full base- 
ment, 2.5 car attached 
garage on large corner lot. 
Nice home in great 
location. Long term lease 
S975/S1 28,000. Option 
deposit $4,800. 
Land Management 
815-678-4334 



No. 93 C 1529 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN 

DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS- EASTERN DIVISION 
Home Savings ol America, FSB 
I/k/a Home Savings of America, FA, 

Plaintiff. 
VS. 

Steven J. Gltland and Constance A. Girfand, et. al. 
Defendant. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONERS SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 25060 

(fT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 



Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant lo a Judgment entered In 
the above entitled cause on 6/4/93. 

I, Rhonda Davis/Sweeney, Special commissioner lor this court will 

on October 27, 1993 at Ihe hour ol 10:00 a.m. at the front door of Lake 

County Courthouse, IB N. County St., Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the 

highest bidder for cash. Ihe following described premises: 

5 Oxford Dr., Lincolnshire, IL 60069 

The Improvements on Ihe property consists ol single family, brick 
constructed, one story dwelling, 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, 
certified lunds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes 
and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open lor inspection. 

The judgment amount was 5239,816.99, 

Upon Ihe sale being made the purchaser will receive a Certificate ol 
sale which will enlrtle the purchaser to a deed on a specified dale 
unless the property ts redeemed according to law. 

For Inlormallon cat the Sales Officer al Plaintiff's Attorney, Fisher 
and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois (312) 372-4784 (rom 
1:00 p'.m, to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois law, Ihe Sales Officer Is 
QQl required to provide additional Information other than thai sat forth 
In this notice. 



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Make a new friend... Look for the 
FREE "Personally Speaking" 

coupon in this week's Classifieds! 
Lclkelaild Newspapers 



.?iiiiitiiiiiimitiiiinmimitinimniiiimiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiui mi minimi ti 



Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakotand Newspaper* 43 



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REAL ESTATE 




Homes 
For Rent 




Mobile Homes 



NEWER 3-BEDROOM RANCH 
In Fox Lake, l.OOOaq.fl., all 
kitchen appliances Included, 2- 
1/2 car garage, central air. 
Avaltabte Nov.lst. $775/month 
^security. (708) 223-5186. 

W AU CON DA- L AKEFRONT 3- 
BEDROOM home, al applances, 
2-car garage, $740/month. 
Avaltabte now {708)4 B7-5884 or 
(708)940-7180. 




Homes Wanted 



WANTED TO BUY- Home on 
contract sale by owner. Antloch, 
Lake Villa or Gray stake area. 3* 
bedrooms or more, fui basement. 
Have $10,000 available for down 
payment. Can dose anmedaloly. 
(708) 588-1907 Between 5pm- 
9pm. 




Apartments 
For Rent 




Condos/ 
Town Homes 



OURNEE TOWNHOUSE: 2 
bedroom, don and llreptace, 1 5 
balhs, 1 car garage. (70B)336: 
8971.S86.S0O. 

BY OWNER- 2-STORY 
townhome, In Stonebrook 
Townhomos now subdivision, 
Gumeo. Excellent builder,. 2- 
bodrooms, loft, 2-1/2 balh, fully 
appfanced, 1-car attached garage, 
neutral decor, nicely upgraded. 
Call for appointment. (708)367- 
5900 days Pally, (708) 855-1749, 
eves. 

ONE BEDROOM BI-LEVEL, 
Fox Lake Condo. $33,000. Call 
Beeper #312/703-9340. 




Mobile Homes 



1970 DELTA MOBILE HOME. 
2-bedroom, all appliances stay, 
new windows and doors, $8,000 
(708) 740-8366 or (708)861- 
2577. 

LAKE GENEVA- 1991 like-New 
16x80 Mobile home, 3-bedroom, 
2-bath, all appliances, garage, 
carport, deck, central air. New 
Park. Many extras. (414) 
248-7679. 

3-BEDROOM 1-1/2 BATH, 

14x70. New plywood flooring. 
New kitchen cabinets, Make 
Offer. Call (70S) 623-8216 tor 
appointment; (Sheryl) 



14X70, 2-BEDROOM WITH 
shed. Washer dryer, stove, 
refrigerator. Newly remodeled. 
Kings Way Estates. Must Sell!! 
$l3,ooo/best offer. (708) 
244-2507. 



WAUKEGAN 

"MOVErlN SPECIALS" 
l&2bdims $510-5595. 
• 1/2 month Free Rem 
•1/2 month Security Deposit 
moves you in I Large units, all 
appliances. Military clause. 

1KEY INVESTMENT 
& MANAGEMENT, INC, 
708-260-2900 



used g 

MOBILE 
g HOMES g 
S FOR SALE A 

Call for details 9 
i 414-857-2891 fe 

Rainbow g 
3 Lake Manor g 




2200 Lewis Ave., ZIon 

1 Bedroom From $395 

1 Bedroom From $495 

INCLUDES HEATH 

Appliances • Custom Blindi 

On-Siie Manager • No Pal 

CiU Manager lo view 

708-872-5404 
708-731-1804 




Apartments 
For Rent 




Apartments 
For Rent 




Apartments 
For Rent 



1991 1,B00SO.FT. MOBILE 

Home, central air, dishwasher, 
dock, ^bedroom, 2-balh, 353,000 
wflt negotiate. (708) 263-5955. 

PURCHASE OR RENT/OPTON. 
Uke new 1 -bedroom in Ports of 
Sullvan Lake. (Lakomoore). Fitly 
furnished, central air, celing fans 
on targe lot. Security, swimming 
pool and much mora. Purchase 
for S42.500 or rem $450ftnonth. 
Possible financing with 20% 
down. Day3 (312) 767-6941 or 
eves (708)598-1185. 



FRESHLY PAINTED AND 
remodeled 1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT. Quiet Building, 
North Chicago. Near Base. 
$400/month. No pets. (708) 
473-3513. 

FURNISHED APARTMENTS 
$365-5450. Non-smokers. Must 
be seen lo be appreciated. (708) 
746-68B1. 

ATTENTION MED. STUDENTS- 
SENIORS- SINGLES. 1-bedroom 
and Studio. Qulel, clean, 
remodeled. FREE HEAT and 
water, parking, laundry. Resident 
Manager (708)244-7433. 

BONNIE BROOKE MANOR 

SPACIOUS 1+2 bedrooms. 'On- 
site management and Service. 
•Best location and security "FREE 
Heat, Gas, Water 'A/C, Laundry, 
Storage. Parking. 
•N.W.Waukegan. •Quiet, Comfort, , 
Deluxe. 'Senior Discounts- No 
Pets. (708) 263-8755. 

CANTERBURY APARTMENTS 
1402-16TH Ave. Deluxe 2- 
bedroorn, all appliances starling 
at S465/mo . +security. No pets. 
Credit references. (414) 
694-2525. 



FOX LAKE- STUDIO apartment, 
24hr security, $385/monlh 
+o!ectrlc -t-1/month security 
deposit. Available Oct.15. (708) 
838-0211. 

GRAYSLAKE- 2-BEDROOM, 
BALCONY, fireplace, laundry 
In building, alrcondllonlng, pool. 
$700/month. Pels additional. 
(708)223-1312. 

GURNEE- CARRIAGE HOUSE 
APTS. 1-bedroom apartment to 
SUBLET. $529-$579/month 
depending on arrangements. 
Security may be roquted Includes 
gas, heat, water, Cable, phone 
and electric extra. Pool and close 
to Warren High School. (708) 
263-7875 after 5pm or (703)295- 
2010. days. 

LAKE VILLA- DELUXE 2- 

bedroom apartment, targe 
ktchen, beach rlghls. S600mxnlh. 
Includes heal. (708)356-9112. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake villa. 
$525 and 3650/month. Heat 
water, air Included, 
(708)356-5474. 

LARGE FURNISHED MOTEL 
rooms, private bath, cleaning 
service, Cable-TV. Near town. 
Kitchenettes, SilO/weck. Call 
Lake view' Motel, Twin Lakes. 
(414)877-3043. 

NORTH CHICAGO- 

APARTMENT FOR RENT, 2- 
1/2 bedrooms, 3-bath. 1724 ■ 
Shoridan Rd. Cal kH- appointment, 
(708) 866-7094, Section 8 
Welcome. 



NORTH CHICAGO- 24TH St. 
Nice 2-bedroom with carpet, air, 
f resh paint. No pots. $495Anonth 
•futilities. (708) 336-6682. 

PALATINE- RAND/RTE.S3. 
AVAILABLE Nov.lst. 2*edroom 
apartments. Also Oct. 1 si. Starting 
5650/month +up. Appliances, 
central air, heat Included. (708) 
272-7449. 

UNION GROVE, Wl. 2-bedroom 
apartments. FREE heat. FREE 
1/2 month rentl New carpet. 
Celling Fan. Mini binds. Close to 
schools. No pets. From 
$4B8/month. (414) 878-4809. 

VACATION VILLAGE- 

FURNISHED Efficiency 
apartment. A/C, All New 
applances, tennis courts, marina, 
security, pool, laundry room, 
easy access to parking. 1yr. 
lease. 3385/month +eleclrlc. 
$300/depostt Available Oct 9th. 
(708> 587-8258, after 5:30pm. 

VERNON HILLS- 2-BEDROOM 
in 4-uni buMng. Bright, dean and 
quiet. Laundry. No pets. 
S575/monlh. (70B) 647-8694. 

WAUCONDA- 1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT with Fantastic 
view on Bangs Lake. Boat 
slip/storage. Private entrance 
and parking. Laundry. No pets. 
S850/monlh. (70B) 487-6161. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1 and 2 
bedroom apt. Lake Via, $535 and 
$650/monlh. Heat, water, air 
lnculded.(70B) 356-5474 



FOX LAKE- VERY large 2 
bedroom apartment In quiet well 
managed complex, $575/month 
includes Hoall (708)587-1302. 

LAKE BLUFF- 2-BEDROOM 
apartment In quiet private area. 
Pool and clubhouse. 
$625+up/month. Heat Included. 
(708)615-9717. 

LAKE BLUFF- VERY large 2- 
bedroom apartment In quiet well 
managed security complex. 
S500/month. Garage available. 
(70B)473-3931. 

LAKE BLUFF- VERY largo 2- 
bedroom apartment In quiet well 
managed security complex. 
SSOO/monlh. Garage available. 
(708)473-3931. 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS, 3.5 
rnfes west o! CLC on Washington, 
2-bedroom apartment. Heal, gas, 
water Included. Laundry. 
5545/month. No pets! (708) 
328-6674. 

WAUKEGAN MODERN 1- 

bedroom apartment In quiet 
, security bulking. Laundry facflly. 
5425/month. (708)623.9850. 



~^A WATER'S EDGE APTS. 





•FREE gas heat, cooking + water 
•Spaciously designed apartments 
•Scenic country setting 
•Fully equipped picture window kitchens 
•On site management/maintenance 

250 S. Rt. 59 • Fox Lake/lngleside 
708-587-6888 ■ 



Gumce 

ONE BEDROOMS 
FROM $529 

Pays your 1st month rent 
Swimming Pool 
and cooking gas 

CARRIAGE 
HOUSE 

(708) 244-1616 

Short, term leases available 
*ncw resident, 1 year lease 





I 
1 



Autumn Preview 

Pebbleshire Phase I 

T & 2 Bedroom Apartments from $556 
FREE HEA T & Cooking Gas 

* SPACIOUS FLOOR PLANS 

* PLUSH CARPETING 

* MODERN APPLIANCES 

* LAUNDRY FACILITIES IN EVERY BUILDING 
A ON-SUE MAINTENANCE 

* AIR CONDITIONING 
MINUTES FROM HAWTHORN CENTER 

(708) 367-4504 

1 695 Westmoreland Dr. 



rVWl« 



LAKESIDE 

LUXURY 

APARTMENTS! 

•Microwave ovens 

•Washers & dryers 

•Vaulted ceilings 

•Patios or balconies 

•Dishwashers 
•Convenient location 

(708)356-0800 

705 Water's Edge Dr. 
Uke Villa, IL 

On Route 132 (Grand Ave.) 

Just aast of Route S3 el the 

south side of Deep Uka 



4"^*^ ProttMlonatly 
I mMn*g»dby 

U*n»g»ment 
Rsaltypartifrm 




What's New On the Market 



Round 
Lake Beach 

4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, 
tri-level, 2 1/2 car 
garage, fireplace, deck, 
alum, siding, fenced 
yard, $98,400. 

708-546-6308 
after 6:30 p.m. 



MUST SELL 
IMMEDIATELY! 

Call 708-740-8149 

Pouejjion it closing. Townhome, 
Hound Liks Beach. 3 bdrm, 1.5 
balh, living/dining combo with rue- 
place, eal'in kilchen, separate family 
room. 2 car illached garage. Very 
nice cnd-unll. Aa la or wllh 
upgradei. S8S,I00/offeri. FHA 
approved. NOTE: Will alio aell 
option, ahofl-lcrm only. Call Tor 
delaiU & ttfvlew. MOTIVATED ! 



ROMANTIC 
CONDO 

North Lake Bluff Area 

2 bedroom, 2 fireplaces, 

Jacuzzi, pool, tennis. 

Near to Abbotts & 1-94. 

Only $64,900 

Cornerstone Realty 

Brenda Lawler 
(708) 872-8998 



Your Guide 
To Area 

Real Estate. 
Lakeland 

Newspapers 
Call 

(708) 223-8161 



HOME 

BUYERS 

PREQUAIIFY 

for a. mortgage 
ASK FOR 

MIKE MCHAHON 

FIRST OF 
AMERICA 

244*0884 OFFICE 
959^339 ANYTIME 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY LENDER 
.' PIIA/VA toant ayaflaMe 



LIKE NEW 

Only $89,900!! 

Immaculate 2 bed- 
room home is 9 yrs. 
NEW. Huge 2.5 car 
garage, a 12x18 deck, 
NEW central air in 
'93 and much morel 
Close to Chain-O- 
Lakcs and walking 
distance to train sta 
tion. Must see to 
appreciate! 

Call Mike Buccelli at 

ERA BYRNES 

BROTHERS 

(815) 459-5400 



HOMES 

Large 3 bedroom, 2 
bath, 2 1/2 car garage 
with walkout basement 
on large wooded lot. 
Fox Lake location. 
Home Warranty Policy. 
$119,900. FHA, VA. 

Executive type home 
with 3-4 bedrooms, 2 
1/2 baths, whirlpool tub, 
oak trim in beautiful 
Oak Valley Estates. 
$176,900. 

CHAIN O LAKES 
REALTY 

(708) 587-8233 



Beautiful 

New 3 bdrm, 2 full 
baths, manufactured 
home in Lake* Geneva. 
Vinyl double-glazed 
windows, central air, 
2x6 side wall construc- 
tion, (1,152 sq. ft.) Alt 
this and more for 
$41,900. Pool, club 
house facility, play 
ground & more. Call 
for details.- 

414-248-3831 

Pioneer 
Estates 

Hwy. H South 
Lake Geneva, Wl 




Rooms For Rent 



WATERFRONT ROOM 



Private Entrance 

Private Bath 

$90/week 

(708) 356-2747 




Bus. Properly 
For Sato 




I 



Bus. Property 
For Sale ':'■: 



3G-UNTT APARTMENT. (MAY be 
1 sold as scparato12 or 24-unlt 
'BUILDINGS) Bank M.A.I. 
I Appraised at 51,225,000 on 

7/1 #3. Duo to owner relocation, 
; sacrifice price 5995,000. (414) 

367-5943. .__ 

APPAREL STORE- DUE TO 
PARTNERSHIP TERMINATION; 
new booming business for SALE . 
Come wak+i and Own everything 
Set- up and Ready. All you do Is 
make SALESI Includes all 
Inventory, fixtures, register, 
counters, displays, signs and 
business name, and al advertising 
(or the year. Great Investment. 
Excelent potential. Proven Sales. 
(708) 356-3647. 



3-BEDROOM HOME TO share, 
Waukegan. Oft-slroet parking. 
Laundry. $375/month utilities 
Included. (708)336-4252 after. 
4:30pm or weekends, 

NON-SMOKING 
PHOFESSIONAL- 
MALE/FEM ALE to share house 
InWauconda. $300 +1/3 utlllles. 
No pets. (708) 526-3203, leavo 
message. 

ROOMMATE WANTED TO 

share 2-bodroom, 1-1/2 bath 
townhome In Gumee, $350Anonth 
+1/2 utilities. Non-smoker. (706) 
855-1514. 



ZION- FREE LAUNDRV, FREE 
CABLE, FREE UTILITIES! Clean 
unfurnished /furnished Sludto In 
private home'. Microwave and 
ro I rig orator. Weekly. (708) 
746-7741. 



COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 
FOR SALE or Leaso by Owner. 
S.OOOsq.ft. building. Large lot. 
Ample parking. Long Lake 
location. $165,000 (708) 
546-7474, or (708)546-0368. 

KENOSHA, WISC. 4-UNIT 
apartment building, maintenance 
free. Excellent cash flow. Must 
Soil! $150,000 (414) 694-0592. 




Bus. Property 
For Rent 



FOX LAKE OFFICE Rental) 
Center of Downtown. Utilities 
Included. $250/month. 1 -month 
security deposit required. 

(706)823-44B5. 

GRAYSLAKE AREA- 

3,00OSQ.FT. with (3)overhead 
doore. Great for Heavy industrial, 
etc. Available now (708) 
566-5564. 

GRAYSLAKE- 8S0SQ.FT. 3- 
OFFICES +receptlon -ffile 
room/storage, on Maintenance- 
free tot. Close to Commerce and 
plenty of parking. Call (708)872- 
2956. 

HIGHLAND PARK- 1350 Old 
Skokle Rd., Sublet- 2-ground 
floor storefronts. 2-upstalrs very 
large office suites. Current renter 
will subsidize rent until 6/94. 
(708) 831-4720. 



Car Lot 

onRt. 12 

in Richmond with excel- 
lent visibility. Car lot with 
1 1/2 bays, detached 
garago and sales office. 
|795/month. 

Land 
Management 
815-678-4771 



Business Rentals 

Spring Grove 

1,000 sq. ft. and larg- 
er. Lite Industrial/ 
manufacturing starting 
at $3.95/sq. ft. gross. 

Spring Ridge 

Business Ctr. 

815-675-6183 



I 



BUSINESS 




Vacant Lots/ 
Acreage 



3/4-ACRE WOODED LOT, 
IMPROVED with sewor and 
water. New subefvtsion of custom 
homes. (708) 526-3821. 

1-ACRE LOT, FISH CREEK 

Subdivision, Ingleslde, 
$64,900/negotlable. (706) 
653-8362. 

S-ACRES, FULLY WOODED 
Near WIscortslrvllllnots border. 
Easy access to Highway 12. 
$50,000 (414) 279-3723. 



CHAIN O'LAKES, IL Lakefront 
lot on Long Lake. Also lots with 
beautiful view of lake. (414) 
724-5402. 



44 Lakeland Newspaper* 




Vacant Lots/ 
Acreage 



FOR SALE- 3HOURS from 
Ubertyvllle, 25-acres and old 
trailer near Buffalo Lake, 
Packwaukee, Wise. Good 
'hunting and fishing. (708) 
367-^0841. 

RAINBOW LAKE- ADULT Parte 
2-mlles east of Antloch. Large 
lakeside corner lot, 14x70 
Ottoman, oondal air, washert*ver, 
stove, refrigerator, large shed, 
some furnishings, $20,900 (414) 
857-7071. ED. 

(SUNDIAL FARMS IN Spring 
Grove, 1-Full ACRE Only 
$39,900/ negotiable, in executive 
homes area. Near beautiful 
wooded Stale Park, by Chain 
O'Lakes. Call (708) 
985-7796/0 wner for details. 



I FOUNTAIN HEAD ' • 
'CORPORATE CENTER j; 

ONRT. 12 IN RICHMOND I 
! Superior 2,650 sq. fL r. 
B to 5,100 sq. ft. unit a 
£ Overhead door/lock J[ 
A/C Office 



LAND MANAGEMENT J 
(815)678-4771 

D0 BfS BOI DO DO BO OCT 

BUSINESS 

IPROPERTYi 

FOR RENT 

'Chain O' .Lakes' 
'Marina w/approx. 50' 
'slips, launch, boat' 
rentals, sails & 
'repair. Good income' 
'& room to grow.] 
[Lease or option; 
' Michael Lescher 

•Your link to the Chain"". 

i Re/Max Advantage | 
(708) 395-3000 




; Resorts/ 
Vacation Rentals 



MYRTLE BEACH, SC. 
Oceanfront. Weekly rates- $125 
October- March 15. Dally and 
Monthly rates also available. 
Call Firebird Motor Inn 1/800- 
852-7032 tor Brochure/ 
reservations. 

NAPLES FLA. AREA- 
BON1TA BEACH. Gull View, 
Immaculate 2-bedroom, 2-balh, 
Luxury Condo, Pool, Tennis On 
Premises, Easy Beach Access. 
1-month minimum Avalabfe Nov., 
Dec., Jan. Cal 1 (516) 261-4788, 
after 7pm. 

|iMFJ!C0-PUEHT0 VAlLARTAl 

peaches, shopping, golf,' 
[deep eea fishing, Stay In a| 
[luxurious villa, a Richard| 
| Burton property. 

Free brochure 
(803) 842-6633 



Out Of Area 

Property 



Ml. THUMB AREA 

Casovllle. 60* Lake Frontage on 
No. Shore of Sand Pto. w/5br, 2 
level homo. LC Tom*. Port AuWai 
Village. 3BR, yrtound home, excel 
condition w/1 Iff fmtg. SI8QK. other 
Lakotront properties also avail. Cal 
Dole, Real Estate One, 

517-874-5181 



WISCONSIN 
GREEN LAKE 

5BR, 2 story home on 14 acs. Horm 
built In 1930. Cunrenty operating as a 
Veal Farm wllh 156*142* Metal CJad 
Wood Fromo facility. Potential to be 
used for alloc nate purposes. Jutt min- 
utes from Big Green lake. $250,000, 
PSuim Dot/ma RE.. W5559 Hwy 496, 
Waupurv Wl 53963. 414024-4314 



Wisconsin, OC0N0M0W0C 
Only 1 1/2 hr. drive to ski, 
fish & swim on beautiful 
Okauchoo Lake. 3BR home 
w/gorgoous sunsets. $160's. 
Oconomowoc Realty. 

414-567-3611 



NO. MICHIGAN 

Lower Peninsula. 490 ac rolling 
lorrain w/soml pvt. lake. Wooded 
pvt retreat for family or group, 5br 
guest unit & 3br 1200 s.f. cottage 
i dock. Workshop, boathso. 
I425K, I125K down w/tormi 
avail. Call Mike Sherwood, 616- 
627-0Q9t or write 846 S. Main SL, 
Cheboygan, Ml 49721. 



FOR SALE...0no of a kind year 
round lakefront vacation home. 
On chain of 28 lakes nr. Eaglo 
River. Wl. Great fishing, boating, 
swimming, snowmobillng, screen 
porch, stone frpl, 4-6br, $ car gar., 
J133K. KonH. 

800-992-0722 day 
303-670-3440 eve. 



WISCONSIN 

Veiy Lew Crime Aroa. 4BR, 2 
l/2bth classic colonial home 
on very wooded lot In River 
Oaks Subdivision. Close to 
the IL line off 1-94. Asking 
$239K. By Owner. 

Call 414-694-2947 



MICHIGAN 

Corey Lake, 3 Rivera. Lge dean 
lake. Ski. swim, active Yacht 
dub. 4BR, 2bTh, grt rm, hot tub, 
lge deck. CA, guest hse, sandy 
beach, IrgbL $259,900. 

616-244^388 ev^Mnds 



COLORADO VAIL 
SPECTACULAR 

Baavor Creek, 5br. 5bth, finest qual- 
ity, on flolf course, 5000 e.t, B 
Person Jacuzzi, gams rm. decks, 
great views, $870,000. Also avail. 
Condos. homes, ranches. Cal Parti 
Brave, Century 21 Veil VaBey. Ire 

1-800-397-1889 



WEST VIRGINIA 

AN ELEQANT APPROACH! 

Executhro homo w/lncrodifcJo floor- 
plan In Jefferson Co., WV. 
Includes in-door lap pool & court 
yard. Brochure avail. $360,000. 
Nancy Wilson, REM AX 
1-800-296-7140 



Friday, October 1, 1993 




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^i6Uuit&S^!m^^'Cy?i^7A^}^i^y^'iyi.^ , y'i^ : 7. i^V^r'l 



REAL ESTATE 



n/Kr^^M^».«^^g«»»3^3^.<|f^^ 




Boats/ 
Motora/Bc. 



TRANSPORTATION 




i 



Care For Sale 




Out Of Area 
Property 




Out Of Area 
Property 



■RETIRE IN ARIZONA' Free 

Video, Retirement Homes for 
less than $39,900 In the "Valley 
of the Sun*. CalTo* Free 1/800- 
955-6360, We'l Do The Rest. 

1-BEDROOM LAKEFRONT, 

WITH appliances, (air, fridge, 
stove) 1-1 te-cargargage, electric 
heat, dec* aJI around, own pier, 
Owner will finance at 0% 
Interest. Must selL 1hr. north of 
Delta. $69,900 or offer. (708) 
395-4641. 



BURLINGTON, W1. 

Browns Lake, Best Shore. 
3br w/frplc, gravel bottom 
& seawall. Beautiful view, 
spac wood deck, pier, 
boats, etc. Incld. $320,000. 
Call Dr. Hammes 

41 4-767-1 SSUvmsg. 



SAILBOAT- BUTTERFLY, 12FT. 

With trailer. Excellent condition. 
Extra sails, Great Starter Boalf 
$1,295.-(708) 381-2727. 

SEA RAY 1989, 268, SUN . 

Dancer, 330hp, 370 hours, . 
Camper canvas, extended 
warranty, etras clean. $38,900 
(708)367-1128, 




Camping 



KANSAS/S.E. 

Tired ol cty IIa7 Old couple tell- 
ing beaut, 2700 si farm house. Mi 
ml. US Hwy 64 frontage. One ol 
nlcetl properties, W tenia & JopBn. 
SOac, leveral ponds, orchard, 
wildlife, tncfdt 2800 if eomrrtl 
bldg, no zoning. J10OK owner. 

316-939-4872 



MICHIGAN 

Contemp. 14 sided 5 yr. old home 
overlooks scenic lake. Beautiful 
landscaped 3br. 2 i/2bih. all oak 
trim Interior, cedar caih colls. 
Upper level decks, brick frpJc. Into. 
& pictures avail 

61 6-651-4225 wkdays, 
616-651-7626 other. 



PULL-BEHIND CAMPER 
TRAILER, wflh air conditioning, 
toilet with shower, stove. $600 
(708) 546-8405. 




Travel/Vacation 




Real Estate Misc. 



YOU ALWAYS Hrr 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



WE BUY MORTGAGES AND ; 
TRUST DEEDS NATIONWIDE. 
OBELISK FUNDING. (708) 
395-1140. 



W!1!BKOn!SF>f3STSS^!SlSSSSSl^iftSSBeB3SBaEesaWBBnBI 



RECREATIONAL 



24FT. TRAVEL TRAILER setup 
In beautiful camp site. White 
Water Late, 75 miles form fflnote. 
Hasbultt-ln addition. Extra nice. 
Must sell! $4,000/or TRADE for 
snowmobile or 7? (708) 
652-5617. 

TRAVEL TRAILER, 1878 35ft. 
Great for hunting, fishing and 
vacationing. 20ft. mil out awning. 
Microwave, a/c, plus lots more. 
$3500best offer. (70S) 546-7548. 



r™*H*********™****™*a*™flf»***Ftfrifm 




Recreational 
Vehicles 

107/ CHEVY SANTANA camper, 

conversion van. Sink, stove, 
refrigerator. Sleeps 5. Very nice 
condition. $1 ,500/or reasonable 
offer. Must seflil (708) 497-9041 . 

1882 20FT. MOTOR home, 

50,000 mles. Very good cone* ion 
Inside and out. Asking $5,500 
(708) 336-6790. 

20FT. 1977 MIDAS Motor Home 
In very good condition, Moving 
Must Self! $3^60 (708)438-3198. 

29FT. TRAVEL TRAILER, Extra 
nice, 4yr.old Terry, awning and 
screen room Included. $8,000. 
(414)889-8214. 

FORD EXTENDED CAB truck, 
wth 35ft. Shasta 5th wheel Must 
sell due to death In family. 
514,000/bost offer. Call Jerry 
after 6pm. (708) 223-2925 

FORD- 1985 350 CHASSIS 
Diamond Motor home, 30,000 I 
miles, perfect condition, all 1 
automatic; $10,000. ADMIRAL 
8cu.fL refrigerate, grxxlcondton, > 
$80; 3400 FORD Tractor with 
some oqulpmont, $6,200; 206ft 
doubte OUNCOLN Copper Weld 1 
Cable $500. (708) 872-2197. 




Sports 
Equipment 




Snowmobiles/ 
ATVs 



SNOWMOBILE- 1986 POLARIS 
Indy 400, carbides, cover, hand 

and Biumb warmers, low mloage, 
very dean, $1 ,950 CaJTom (708) 
634-3265. 

YAMAHA- 1975, GPX 433 

Snowmobile. In very good 
condition $350/best offer (815) 
338-8363, Keith. 




Boala/ 
Motors/Etc. 



1 6FT. HOBIE CAT, fantastic In 
fight air, unbelievable thrill In a 
heavy wind, Harken equipped, 
fully battened jib, dual trapeze, 
canvas cover, custom trailer, 
$2,200 (706) 816-7261 mornings 
orevenlngs. 

A FUN BOAT- You can afford. 
Caravelle with 115hp Merc 
outboard, runs great. Trailer 
hduded. $3,2oat>est offer. (708) 
526-1996. 

BOAT- 1986 SEA RAY, with 
100hp Mercury outboard motor, 
E-Z loader trailer Included, walk- 
thru V-hull. tape deck, bulttln 
cooler, excellent like new 
condtion, $550Qbest offer (706) 
356-1294. . 



BOAT- CENTURY ARABIAN, 
1974, 330hp Chrysler, low hours, 
with trailer. $3,000 (708) 
496-4070 leave message. 

BOAT- 1SFT. FIBERGLASS 
With 2Shp Evlnrude, trailer, 
$1.10Miest otter. (414) 878-0683. 

BOAT LIFTS ADDITIONAL 

DISCOUNTS ON REMAINING 
93 INVENTORY! All size IHts, 
canopies, piers, boat & pontoon 
trailers. New & Usedl Jet ski 
Trailers & Ufts. AS Aluminum by 
Triton and Karavan. Snowmoblo 
Trailers. Pre- season sale prices. 
DAN'S SURF & TURF 1-800- 
646-2744. 



TOTTER STORAGE 

$200.00 

Winterizing/Cleaning/ 
Wrapping 

Call (708) 356-2747 



1988 SEA RAY 221t Cuddy, 
excellent condition, extrasl . 
$11,500/llrm. (70S) 515-9080, 
days or (708)620-7240 eves. 

1993 WELLCRAFT ECLIPSE 
196SS, Shours on boat. All 
warranty. 175hp, V6 engine, 
55mpg, fully equipped. Boat in 
water for test. $18,500 (708) 
395-71 B2. - 

2S.5FT. 1990 MIRAGE 257 , 
Trovare cuddy, 455 Magnum 
with trailer, excellent condition, 
very low hours, Must see! (708) 
426-4693. | 

BOAT STORAGE! CALL 
(414)857-2525 Between 61m 
and 5pm. (Mon-Frl) or 8am- 
3pm Saturdays. Ask for DON 
or LEE 

17FT. BOAT WIHT95hp Motor. I 
includes Land to shore radio I 
and 1 roller, $1,500/best offer 
(708) 546-5946. ! 

BOAT- 197S LARSEN, 

Fberglass, 19ft. Irboard, 175hp, 
V-6, SSOhoure. $2,B00Vbest offer 
(414) 694-6475. 

BOAT- 1986 SEA RAY, 21ft. 
MidCabin, loaded, 170 Merc I/O, 
shorepower, microwave oven, 
refrigerator, stand-up head, 
tandem trailer, much more, 
excellent condition, $13,000 or 
best offer. (615) 344-0564. 

1975 HYDROSTREAM WITH I 

1l5molor, motor has less than [ 
100 rw3, apodal prop, srnal hote • 
in hull. Boat, motor, and trailer | 
$1,500 Alter 4pm. (70S) 
395-1345. ' 

BAYLINER, 19891/2 SPECIAL 
EoHJon, 235 hp, 21" cuddy cabin 
with trailer, stlil under warranty. 
Take over payments. Mint 
conation with tow hours. Testing 
available. (708)837-3669 after 
5pm. (708)437-7040 days. 

CABIN CRUISER- 31 FT. South 
Hampton Marine Corp, Flybridge, 
remodeled living area, twin V-8 
MerCrulsers, $19,900 May 
consider partial trade (414) 
052-^865, days (414)657-5446, 
after Bpm. 

1981 225 SEA RAY Day Cruiser, 
260hp, 10, E-Z Laoder trailer, 
Marina radto, extras, A-1 condtlon. 
Stored Inside, $11,500 (708) 
382-7040 or (708)934-9292. 

KAWASAKI, 1992750SS NEW 
Stainless steel Impeller, aprox. 
20-30 girl driven hours, super 
fast, with trailer. S4 ,950.llrm. Call 
Cindy (708) 838-0442. 

LUND- 16FT. 1992 40hp 
Evlnrude, console, stereo, live- 
well, $5,700 (706) 862-9591, 
eves, 

MASTERCRAFT 1987 287 
hours, Very clean. $10,000 firm. 
(708) 336-3727. > 

NEW EAGLE TRAILER, I 

capacity: 24 It. boat, bunk bed, | 
hydraulic brakes, $2,20Qfllrm. 
(708)515-0080 days or(708)620- • 
7240, eve3. 

OUTBOARD MOTOR- 7SHP 

Johnson Stinger, controls 
Included, recently rebuilt, runs 
excellent $2,00QVbost offer (708) 
680-7728. 

PONTOON BOAT- 24FT. Sea 

Nymph Suncmlser, 1985, 40hp 
Evlnrude, al new upholstered 
seats, like new floor, new 
aluminum top covered with 
canvas, comes with 1992 new 
Tralimastor tandem trailer. In 
water. Complete $7,500 (70S) 
879-0649 or (708)679-0648. 



BAMBOO FLY RODS and old fly 
fishing equipment Bought, Sold 
and TRADED. (414) 694-1759. 

EXERCYCLE, SCHWINN AIR 
Dyne deluxe stationary exercise 
bke, fuDy computerized, like new 
$495.(815)675-2148. 



TRANSPORTATION 




Cars For Sale 



FORD PROBE, 1969, red, tinted 
windows, sunroof, automatic. 
Highway miles. Must seel (414) 
694-7330. 

FORD, 1977 FAIRMONT, 

excellent engine, new lies, needs 
body work and 1 -front brakeHrve. 
$400/bost (708) 587-1302. 

FORD, 1977 T-BIRD, runs good, 
body good, new tiros, exhaust, 
muffler, battery, 76,000 miles, 
$600/best offer. Needs Valve 
job. (706) 272-^1474. 

CHEVY, 1988 CAMARO, V-6, 

automatic, white, mint condtlon, 
no rust! Bra and louvers. Excellent 
runner, diagnostic test done. 
S4.200ibest offer (414) 656-1559. 

FORD, 1988 T-BIRD, V-6, Runs 
good. First $3,950 of best otter. 
(708)593-2270 9am-5pm or (815) 
344-6850. 

FORD- 19S7, MUSTANG 5.0 
GT T-tops, mags, low miles, 
stored winters, balance on 
warranty $7,850/bost (414) 
652-2110 or (414)556-5169. 

GEO, 1992 METRO, Slick shift 
5-speed, 24,oooAnies, Uko New. 
White with pin stripe, You'll Get 
51mpg! $5,350 or best offer. 
After 6pm Call (708) 395-6546 
ask for Debbie. 

HONDA, 1981 PRELUDE, 5- 
speed. sunroof, runs well, 
5450/bost offer. 1981 OLDS 
CUTLASS, 6-cylnder, automatic. 
runs well. $600; JOHN DEERE 
1010 CRAWLER with loader and 
backhoo. $6,500. (TQ8) 776-7571. 

JAGUAR, 1982 XJ6, British 
Green, automatic, full power, 
Ngh mles. Newer battery, starter, 
brakes and tires. $5,500 (708) 
587-5306. 

LEXUS, 1990, LS400, 

sliver mist metallic, only 26K 
miles, loaded wflh numberous 
standard features +optlonal 
traction control, memory seat, 
moonroof , remote &CD changer, 
Grey leather Interior Includes 
dealer Installed phone. 1-drfver- 
Corp. Lease Return. $28,695. 
EM KAY INC. (706) 3TO-95Q0. 

MAXDA, 1985, RX7, automatic, 
air, 56,000/mllos, alarm, extra 
dgan. Must see (708) 490-0714, 

MAZDA RX7, 1980, good 

condition, new tires, air, 5-speed, 
arrvfm stereo cassette, $800Aest 
Offer. (615)675-2431. 

MAZDA, 1987 RX7, red, 5-speed, 
sunroof, afr, cruise, arrvTm cassette 
$5^00toest offer (708) 548-1163. 

CHRYSLER, 1989, LEBARON, 
35K mles, aibag, ami m cassette, 
new tires. $6,60abest offer (706) 
395-6014. 

CORVETTE, 1971 

CONVERTIBLE, big block, 
automatic. Asking $19,00, 
Evenings. (414) 889-4161. 

DATSUN, 1981 200 SX, 5-Spood, 
Loaded. $1 ,250/bost offer (708) 
587-7180. 




I 



Cars For Sale 



BUICK CUTLASS 

OLDS MOBILE, 1976, groat body. 
good running, needs a Kilo work. 
Best offer. (708)432-7404. 

BUICK, 1965 SKYLARK GRAN 
SPORT, 2-door coupe, 401 4- 
speed, comes with extra engine, 
trans, dutch assembly, trunk Bd, 
rear talldghts, original Interior, 
- front bumper grille. Needs to be 
restored. $1,000. Call (414) 
889-4092 or (312)235-2751 . 

BUICK, 197S CONVERTIBLE, 
5,250 original mfles, red with 
white top, while Interior, Never 
been In rain or anow! 
520,000/best Offer. (708) 
251-4249. 

BUICK, 1978 PARK AVE Good 
running condition, Best offer. 
Can after 5pm. (708) 587-2052. 

BUICK, 1983 LESABRE, 4-door, 
V-6, very clean, air conditioning, 
power windows, power door 
locks and more. 54,000/mIles. 
$3,000 (708) 526-9385, after 
6pm. _^ 

I BUICK, 1988 CENTURY Wagon. 
Dealer serviced. Heavy duty" 
engine, loaded with options, 
$4,5O0/best (708) 295-6241. 

BUICK, 1989 REGAL, custom 
coupe, sparkling black, loaded. 
Excelert condlton. $6,900. (708) 
, 356-6537. . 

CADILLAC.DEVILLE, 1987, 
LOADED, grey/grey, very clean 
$7.500. (708)430-6423. 

CADILLAC, 1984, SEDAN 

Do Villa, Loaded, super excellent 
running condition. No rust, low 
miles. Owned in South. $3,300 
(815)356-6106. 

CADILLAC, 1985 COUPE 

DeVUIe, good condition. Loaded 
with extras, $2,400 (815) 
385-71 17, after 3pm weekdays. 

CAMARO, 1986 Z-28, T-tops, al 
power, excellent condition. 
55,900/best (414) 275-3565, 
eves. 

CHEVROLET- 1964 CAMARO, 

excellent runner. $2,000/best 
Offer (414) 697-1317. 

CHEVY BLAZER SILVERADO, 

1986, K-5, V-8. Automatic, loaded, 
black, silver. Sharp. Reese hlch, 
55k original owner. $7,800 /best 
(70B) 356-6578. 

CHEVY, 1971 CHEVELLE. M 

original, $1 ,0O0A»est offer. 1 980 
FORD CROWN VICTORIA, 
excellent condition. $400 (708) 
360-1675. 

CHEVY, 1979 M ALIBU wagon, 
140K, V-8, Good runner, 
$750/best offer (708) 623-5034. 

CHEVY, 1979 M ALIBU, 267 V- 
6 engine, body and Interior dean, 
very little rest. $1 ,950Aest offer 

(708) 356-9552 or (708)356- 
95B7. 

CHEVY, 1980 PICKUP. Good 
condition, runs great, fiberglass 
cap. new (Ires, double gas lank. 
Nice and dean. Asking $2,650 
(708)546-1240. 

CHEVY, 1987 CAVALIER 

wagon, automatic, very clean, 
good running family car. 
S2,20Obesl offer (708) 265-9664. 

CHEVY- 1978 IMPALA 8- 

cylinder, slatlonwagon, $1,200 
Cash and FIRM. Evenings and 
weekends (70B) 526-3718. 

CHEVY- 1983 

STATIONWAGON. New 

transmission, new exhaust, 
brakes. Body In good condition. 
$1,995(7081587-0691. 



*We Buy All Makes* 
Cars, Trucks, Boats 

RVs and Motorcycles 
Good Credit? Bad Credit? 
Bankruptcy No Probleml 

Buy Here/Pay Here 

'84 Nissan Senlra Wagon „$ 1995 

B5 Saab 9003 .„ $3995 

04 Pont. Flero „,„...$3495 

"92 Joop Wrangtar „„.„..$t2,995 

•69 Farias SurfcW. $4096 

65 Mazda FIX 7. ................ t4 995 

86 Pontlac Grand Am SE..$4995 
'85 Plymouth Voyagor Van ..S4 995 
88 Mercury Tracor Wagon .53995 

"82 Cavalier ..._, ........$995 

88 Escort QT _.$4995 

'87 Cruyskx LeBaron Convert. JS009S 
'88 Dodgo4x4 Pickup „__.$799S 
■89 Butok Le Sabre Umriod _$7995 

'88 Pontic 6000 LE $5995 

86 Plymouth Lazor XT 52995 

•81 VW Rabbit $1995 

85 Morcury Cougar ...$2995 

'83 Toyola Turcot..... „.$1995 

We Lease All Makes 

Morquardt 

!!oteffl0o9i^y.rfrroda.ft nr 



On RL 41 at 

Washington St., East exit. 

JtGurnee, IL (708) 249-T300* 




I 



Care For Sale 



PONTIAC, 1973 CATALfNA 
400, 46,000 miles, 4-door, power 
steering/brakes, air, am/lm dual 
exhaust, fire engine RED. No 
■rust! $2,500/bost offer (708) 
223-8163. 

PONTIAC, 1984 SUNBIRD, 
corrvertble, red with black top, 
many new parts, $3,750/best 
offer (708) 546-6521. 

PONTIAC, 1985 GRAND AM, 
loaded, new tires, no rust $2,500 
(708) 546-6312. 

PONTIAC, 1989 GRAND AM, 
2-door, air, 5-speed, $5,300toosJ 
offer. (708) 356-6474. 

PONTIAC, 1989 GRAND PRIX 
SE, 3.1/ljlor, Leaded. Garage 
kept. Excellent condition, 
43,000/mlles, $9,500. (708) 
432-1849. 

PONTIAC, 1990, 6000-LE, 
CLEAN, 47,000 mfles, $7,000 
(708) 587-2409 or (708)497- 
3745. ■ 

PONTIAC GRAND PRIX, 1985. 
burgandy with grey cloth interior, 
now exhaust, llres and turie-up, 
Power Everything. Very nice, 
dependable car $2,700. 1980 
CORVETTE, BLACK wtth oyster 
Interior, newly rebuilt 300hp 350 
engine and trans. New tires, 
exhaust. $7,800 Call Robyn, 
(708) 587-6925,jiny1ime. 

OLDS, 1978 CUTLASS, white 8- 
cyllnder, automatic, $3007llrm 
CASHONLYI (708)395-1836. 

OLDS, 1986, HOY ALE 88. 2- 
door, loaded, clean, well kept, 
$4.S00 l best offer (708) 265-0180. 

OLDS, 1990 CUTLASS 

SUPREME SL, 4-door, dark btue 
and silver. Every possble optbn 
hdudhg clgtal irtrurnentatbn and 
computerized Informal ion center. 
Exceptionally maintained, like 
new condition, 83.000 mostly 
expressway miles. $8,000 (708) 
244-8603. " 

OLDS- 1968 TORNADO Green 
wtth tan interior, service reelects 
since 1985, Service manual, 
Olds club contacts. Excellent 
running condition, $3,800A>est ' 
ofler (708) 973-1343 Fox Lake. 

OLDS- 1988 9B TOURING 
Sedan Ex cdtort condMon, Whle, 
83k miles, $6,900 (70S) 
390-3783. 

PLYMOUTH, 1933 TURISMO, 
RED wth Maroon Interior, 66500 
miles, new brakes, tires. 
$1 ^OOnSest ofler (708) 740-8366 
or (708)661-2577 . 

DEAL OF THE CENTURY! 1985 
Otdsmoblle CUTLASS. The best 
In town or anywhere around. 
Everything you could possibly 
want and more $3,80Gvbest (708) 
838-4039. 

DODGE, 1983 DIPLOMAT, 4- 

door, loadod. 68,000/mlles, 
$1 jOSOAest offer (708) 356-7470, 
let phone ring. 

DODGE, 1989, COLT Vista 
51 .OOOAnlos, 7-passonger $6500 
(414)857-2911. 

DODGE- 1979 OMNI, new clutch, 
exhaust system, runs good, 
Clean! $850 1982 PLYMOUTH 
HORIZON, S650t»st offer. (414) 
652-8943. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE- 1970 
Buick Wildcat, 455 motor, air, 
rust tree, $1,400A>est ofler (708) 
546-7984. 



Good News 



Bad Credit! 



•Divorced? 
•No Credit History? 

We can help! 

By calling today, 

you could be 
driving tomorrow! 

Call 

708-360-5000 

Ask for Mr, Stcwcrt 



MERCURY, 1982 CAPRI 2-door 
hatchback, $900 or reasonable 
offer (706) 740-2244. 

j MUST SELL- 1985 MERCURY 

: LYNX. Canl Keep! 4-cyIInder 

• automatic, DEPENDABLE DttJo 

car. Low mileage. Si,iooA>est 

offer. CaJI (708) 740-2789, or 

leave message on recorder. 

NISSAN, 1986 MAXIMA SE 5- 

speed, 129,000 original owner. 
Good runner. $4,200 (708) 
566-6554. 

NOVA SS1 973, Big Block, 1200 
miles on rebuilt, 4-speed, 343 
Posl, Red with black stripes, 
black Interior, 15x7 Ratty wheats. 
$4,500feest offer. CHEVY 
CUSTOM VAN 1980, parting 
out, complete grey Interior, 4- 
captains chairs, rear sola, 
carpeting, Hat*, door panels and 
windows , 4-mag wheels, Radial 
white letter tires. CaJI for price 
(708) 587-1477. 

OLDS, 1977 CUTLASS SALON, 
many new parts, excellent 
condition, $1,500/best offer 
(708)688-2043, days, (708) 
265-9076, eves. 

PONTIAC- 1989 FIREBIRD 
Formula 350, T-tops. aB power, 
52,000 miles, excellent condUon, 
$8,900 (708) 949-0533. 

MPONTIAC- GRAND PRIX SE, 
1989, LOADEDI 5-speed, 60k 
mles, excelent conrJuon, $7,000 
(708)587-7741. 

SAAB, 1988 900S automatic, 
4-door, al power, sunroof, new 
tires, looks/runs greai! $6,995. 
(708) 634-8079. 

SEDAN DEV1LLE, 1985, rnd^t 
blue, very dean, solid, air, V-8, 
leather Herior, auto load te voting, 
trip computer, new llres and 
brakes. $3,900 Ask for Chris or 
Kim (708) 546-5160. 

SUBARU, 1985 WAGON, 

automatic, power everything. 
Rear. wiper and defogger. 
$1 ,30Qbest offer (706) 249-2312. 

THUNDEHBIHD- 1978, GOOD 
dependable starter, no dents but 
rusting. 31,000 miles on an 
overhauled engine. 131,000on 
car. Asking $850 but no 
reasonable offer refused. Call 
Roger (414) 862-2133. 

TOYOTA 1987 CAMRY Deluxe, 
Burgandy with burgandy Inside, 
1-owner, Mint condition, B7k 
mfles. $5,600 (615) 344-2017. 

TOYOTA, 1989 TERCEL Deluxe 
Coupe, gray, 62,000/mlles, New 
tires and exhaust systems. 
$4.300. (708) 336-3072. 

TOYOTA- 1986 CRESSIDA, 
wagon, loaded, runs like a lop 
$3.750 (708) 336-3072. 

TRANS AM, 1985. Tinted T- 
tops, 5-speed, V-8, $4,450 or 
best offer. Used, nol abused! 
(414) 942-4127. 

VOLVO, 1991 240, black, 
automatic, power windows, heated 
seats, am/lm cassette stereo, 
22.000/mies, exceleri condrton, 
still under warranty. $14,000 
(708) 263-6654. 




Classic 
Antique Care' 



Saturn 
o/Waukegan 

500 S. Green Bay Road 
WiBkegu 




Rental Leases 



STORAGE SPACE: SUITABLE 
FOR Boat, Camper, Motor Home 
or car. Steel Buldhg at my Union 
Grove, WI. Home. (414) 
878-3304. 




Classic 
Antique Cars 



CHRYSLER- 1964 NEWPORT 
Corrvertble in running condriloa 
$1,500fagt ofler C708) 351-9602. 

EARLY 1937 FORD fastbacM- 
door Sedan with suldlde doors. 
98% oompleto, original engine has 
30-miles on protessbnalV robulL 
Must Seel $3,500/tlrm. (708) 
360-4959, days or (708)746- 
1 729 eves or weekends. Ask for 
Stan. 

CADILLAC, 1972 ELDORADO, 

Restorabte, runs good, tow miles, 
needs some body work, 
$595/best. (815) 728-0200. 

1950 PONTIAC 

SILVERSTREAK, 4-door, straight 
8, automatic transmission, new 
tires, brakes. Runs groat! $3,200 
(414) 658-0400 leave message. 

1955 PACKARD PATRICIAN, 4- 
door, Rust FREE, Tennesseo 
car, Runs good, $2,500 (414) 
862-2681, alto r 6pm. 

ARIZONA CAR- 1971 Monte 
Carlo, 50,000 original miles, 
350cu.ln. 350hp. Showroom 
conrJUoa $4500 (414) 654-6314, 
after 5pm ask lor Rocoo. 

PONTIAC, 1969 FIRBIRD. 

Project car, runs Saoofeest ofler 
(708) 395-6196. 



MUSTANG, 1973, 

CONVERTIBLE, 78,000 ortfnaJ 
mles, Excelent condfUon. Must 
Set $8,00fJUbest (708) 697-8720 
or (708)836-6677. 

NASH 1961 METROPOLITAN, 
Coupe, black and while. 4- 
cyffnder, 3-speed, New interior. 
Unique head turner. Runs and 
looks great. $2,700 (708) 
587-9351. 




Service & Parts 



15X8 KMC TERMINATOR, 2- 

chrome wheels, $500 (or al 4, Be 
new. After 4pm MorvFrt. Anytime 
weekends. (708) 546-6322. 

1956 MGA, NEEDS Restoration, 
1958 MGA solid body, needs 
restoration. 1962 MGA- very 
sold body, atot of extra parts, 
Needs part work and assembly. 
WI sel as package or hdvVfcaly. 
(414) 653-6188. 

CHEVY TRUCK PARTS: 1978, 
Tr a n sm i ssi on and transfer case, 
complete front axle, door glass. 
ALSO mid 1970's Ford 9toch 
Rearend Power steering gear 
box. (708) 336-2387. 

CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 
SALE. Mustang, Camaro, Nova, 
Chevelle, Cutlass, Mopars, 
Pontlac, Chevrolet, morel Trunk 
pans, floor pans, doors, fenders, 
bumpers. New and California 
rust free. MARK'S PLATING 
AND SUPPLY, 217-824-6184. 

FOUR MOPAR MAGNUM 500, 

14 inch 5-epoke wheels, Original 
late 60*8 wtth cap and trim rings. 
Excellent condUon wflh minor 
bumps and bruises on mount 3- 
Cooper Cobra 60-sertes tires in 
great low mile condition. $350 
or best takes al. Call After 6pm 
(708)587-8670. 

FRONT BUMPERS- CHROME 
stainless mirrors. Wheel well 
mouldings. All for 1988*93 
Chevrolet Truck (414) 657-1215. 

j MOVING! MUST SACRIFICE! 

! Al most new grey/green 
SOFTTOP for Full door 1989 
Jeep Wrangtor, best offer (708) 
945-9250. 

NEW UNUSED SPARE TIRE 
and Rim 245X75R 16M+S tor 
1988 and up 1/2-ton 4 -wheel 
drive Chev, GMC, (2)Fkestone 
Mud/snow tires, P155/B0R13, 
no rims: GR78-14 tire and rim, (Is 
OLDS; L78X15, Ure and rim. FIs 
Lincoln, (706) 356-6920. 




Vans 



Friday, October 1,1-993 



1 990 FORD AEROSTAR, Excel 
7-passenger MWvan. Loaded, 
Ctean. $8500best ofter. Excelert 
condition. (708) 872-4625. 

CHEVY 1 969 ASTRO CUSTOM 
Craft Conversion van. Loadedl 
Abhe CD&lereo. 2-sets of tires, 
45k mles. Lke new! $l0500ftm 
(414) 857-7156. 

GMC- VAN DURA 25, 1978, 
engine excelent condition, 8- 
cyltnder, automatic, passenger 
/an. Interior carpeted. $800. 
;414) 694-2369. 

CHEVY, 1988 ASTRO, 4.3, V- 
6, With overdrive, seats 8, 
Winnebago package, roof rack, 
running board, Rally wheels, 
power brakes, air conditioning, 
tilt, cruise, excellent condition in 
and out. Garage kept. GMC 1yr. 
warranty. For motor and drive 
train. Suburban driven. (708) 
697-5747 or (708)697-5572. 

CHEVY, AEROSTAR XLT, 1 989 

1-owner. 62.000/mlles. GREAT 
CONDITION. $8,250 (708) 
223-^1159. eves. 

CHEVY- 1987 GLADIATOR 
Conversion Van, 1-owner, 51 ,000 
miles, power steering/brakes, 
tilt, cruise, exhaust system and 
tires lyrold. excellent condition. 
Asking $7,900 (708) 336-3143, 
after 6pm. 

DODGE, 1972 

WINDOW Van, automatic, power 
steering and brakes. Rusty but 
runs good! $500. (708)587-1 706. 

DODGE. 1979 ROYAL 
Sportsman Window VAN, 1 02,000 
miles, runs but needs minor 
repair, $575/best offer (414) 
862-9539. 

DODGE, 1983 7-PASSENGER 
Family mlnl-van, V-8, automatic, 
am/lm, air, 89,000/mDes, $2,800 
(414)669-6108. 

DODGE, 1990 CARAVAN LE. 

Tan/Beige, 53K, fully equipped 
7-passenger $8.600rbest offer 

(708) 263-1650. 

GMC, 1984 1-TON Cargo Van, 
Runs excellent, some minor rust, 
100k. Asking $3,000. (708) 
740-0718. 



Lakeland Newspapers 45 



. 1 



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. i • : 



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3.4C2 



rttvtaJrBUia*! 



. . -. . ,■>.-■<■■■ I 



(• 



. I •)' 



TRANSPORTATION 




Trucks/Trailers 




Trucks/Trailera 




Trucks/Trailers 



0)1 5-TON DUMP, 50,000 GYW, 
23.000 miles, dtosei. (1)12-ton 
DUMP. 2fl,ooo mles, gas, (1)65ft 

conveyer, (2)forkfllls. Also 
ir equipment (or sale. (708) 

-1018.. 




Trucks/Trailers 



.*,': 



TLT TRAILERS- NEW 4x8 $435; 
5X8 $475; 5X10 $500. (708) 
740-3949. 



C J-7 1 979, ro re great , 
needs body work, $900/best 

oHer (414) 843-2720. 

FORD 1 989 F-250 XLT LARIAT, 
. Super Cab truck. All options and 

accessories. Excellent condHlon, 
'New paint. $8,900/(Irm. 

(708)921-2410 

FORD, 1959 S-YARD DUMP, 
WORKS, $800 (708) 540-9883. 



CHEVROLET, 1977 
SUBURBAN, work truck, good 
condition, Ssoobest otter. (414) 
657-7322. 

FORD, 1973 F250 pickup, Very 
tow miles. Runs excellent, body 
needs work, $700. Will consider 
trade. Call lor details. (70B) 
263-7114. 

CHEVY 1 975 PICKUP 350 4-boI 
main $500*esl oiler. Some rust, 
Dual Wheels (414) 697-1317 

CHEVY, 1987 S-10 4X4 $6,900 
BEST OFFER (414) B62-9750. 

CHEVY BLAZER, 1979 4x4. 
350 manual transmission, very 
dependable. $1,200A>est otter. 
Call Tom after 5pm. (414) 
534-5006. 



FORD, 1987 BRONCO, WORK 

truck, 4 WO with overdrive, 
snowptow, sunroof, running 
boards by ZIEBART, new battery 
and alternator, new muffler and 
tailpipes, new brakes, tires good 
condition, 64,000 miles, 
36,295/otler. Ask lor Bob or 
Rona. (708) 844-6334. 

FORD- 1969 DUMP Truck, 
26,000b. gross weight. $900/or 
best Ottor (414) 876-3883. 

GMC 1980 CREW CAB, 1-ton 
with enclosed 12ft. trailer. Both 
tor only S2,250/bes! offer (708) 
367-1810. 

GMC 1982 CREW CAB, 4-door, 
1-ton dually with utility box, 
$4,000. 1973 F600 FORD TOW 
I duck, dual wheels, 2-speed. rear 
end, $1,000; 1965 IHC FLAT 
1 Bed, duaJ wheels , 2-speed, rear 
end, excelent concftton, $1 ,000. 
Sell or Trade? (414) 652-5617. 



GMC 1 992 JIMMY SLT, 4.3L, V- 
6, 4x4, Forest green, excellent 
condition. All power, towing 
package, leather bucket seals, 
CD/player. 1 -owner, 29k mites, 
(mostly highway) 6yr/60,000 mile 
warrarty, Too many options to 1st 
$17,500/bost offer (815) 
385-0041. . 

CHEVY, 1973 PICKUP DOLLY, 
$500.(414)697-1317. 

CHEVY, 350 MOTOR, 4-speed 
truck transmission, 1871 Chevy 
truck, (615) 943-8254. 

DODGE- 1983 1/2-TON pickup 
truck with cap, mint concfcion, 318 
engine, low miles, $3,300/best 
offer (708) 223-7724. 

F350 FLATBED, 1987 Ford 1- 
ton white, 4x2, V-8, 351 CI, with 
automatic, 12-1 Si , Midwest bed, 
68,000/mllos, $7,900/best offer. 
(61 5)385-5275 or (815) 385-0841 . 



EH 



Trucks/Trailera- 




Motorcycles 




Motorcycles 



GMC, K-5 JIMMY 4x4 1988, V- 
8, automatic, air, new tires and 
mags, 54,000 actual miles, like 
nw, original owner, $8,200 (70S) 
356-7454. ■ 

INTERNATIONAL 5-YARD 1978 
Dump. Runs good, looks good. 
On Ihe road In Wonder Lake. 
$3.00CLt)Gsl offer (815) 653-0015. 

MUST SELL11 1986, NISSAN 
4x4 King Cab, 91 ,000 miles, 
$3^00best offer (708) 546-0530, 
after 6pm. 

TRAILER HITCH TO Fit Chevy 
•GMC S-series Pickups or 
BlazerAJImmy. 3,500 GVW, 300 
tonage weight. Good condition 
with ail mounting hardware. $50. 
(708) 5B7-8670. 

UTILITY TRAILER, 1991 8x8ft. 
with sides, 1, 1001b. capacity, 
title, 5550/best offer (708) 
548-2073, after 6pm. 



SUZUKI QUAD RACER, 1889, 
Ike new, wtth extras. $2,100&est 
otter. (706) 546-4803 

HARLEY- 1975 SPORTSTER 
1000CC, $2,700 Good runner. 
(708)215-1957, Dawn. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON- 1975 XLH 
Motor has 6,000 miles on 
complete overhaul, Including 2 
now cases. All numbers match. 
New general or, pipes, sea), paint, 
O-rlng chain, and new wiring. 
Fal Bob Tank Leather Bags. 
This Is one Good LOOKING 
BKc! $3,950. Cal Mko (708)949- 

8014. . 

HONDA- 1964 INTERCEPTOR, 
fresh paint job, very well 
maintained. $l,800/best offer 
(414) 551-0262. 

HONDA- 1986, VFR 750 teat 
and while, 24.000 miles with 
Supertrapp extausl, K&N Jet kit, 
$2^0CVbest offer (708)662-4500, 
askforKellh. 



HONDA- 1991 GOLDWING, 
•40,000 original miles. $2,000. 
Trahsterlng In 2-weeks, MUST 
SELLI (708) 473-5832. ' 

KAWASAKI, 1975900, 15k 
miles, Very dean. 51.650/best 
Qtfer (708) 587-1477. 

KAWASAKI- 1985 900 Nlnja, 
low miles, new tires, good 
condition. Must sell NOWI 
$1^50Aest offer (414) 694-6919 
aftor 6pm. Kenosha. 

KAWASAKI- MUST SELL 1975 
KZ-400 New clutch, tune-up. 
Runs great. $450/best offer. 
(708) 855-8219. 




Wanted To Buy 



WANTED: JUNKERS, 

KLUNKERSAND RUNNERSI 
Reasonable prices. Same day 
Removal. Junks towed FREE! 
(708) 838-0173, call Bob. 



jt! 
> 
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■ I 



V X i 



(<:■■ 

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MEN SEEKING 
WOMEI 






WOMEN SEEKING 

■■■: ■■-■ ..:■..;:■. : v.'H- ;, : 'v. ,: ,.,>i .. '.:-;, ',,:■, ■•:: 




WOMEN SEEKING 






BEAUTY IS AS BEAUTY 
DOES 

Slnglo while tomato In soarch ol 
malo companion. Senior and seri- 
ous. 5'3", 110 lbs., potito. #20690 



SEEKING SPORTS; 
INTERESTS 



ENGLISHMAN NEW TO 
COUNTRY 

Scoks companionship with lady, 
25-45. I'm In my 30s, and onjoy a 
wide rango ot Interests, #43087 



MEN SEEKING 
WOMEN 



MOVING TO THE AREA. 

Single white malo. 22, 6T, seeks 
single while female, 18-2B, who Is 
intelligent, sincere, honest, likes to 
have tun. I liko sports, outdoors, 
Chicago, hard rock, concerts, 
movies, I will reply to all. #80687 

SINGLE WHITE MALE 

6'2", 23, seeks single while female, 
19-25, for fun weekends, movies, 
companionship. Likes sports, cud- 
dling, dancing, if you want the 
whole package, call. #20267 

SINGLE WHITE MALE 

5'6", 150 lbs., 23. Soeks mature 
single white female, 19-25. Enjoys 
working-oul, performer, college 
wrestler, movies, tun with friends, 
#20266 



SINGLE WHITE MALE 

24, 6', 160 lbs., seeks thin, potito, 
single/divorced female for lasting 
relationship, I am great with kkts, 
and animals. #80910 

SINGLE WHITE MALE 
Seeks fun and romance. It you're a 
single/divorced whlto lomalo, 20- 
30, seeking friendship, lun and 
companionship, call mo. #22176 

SEEKING PLAIN JANE 
Fox Lake single while malo, 35, 
5'9", nice-looking, Athletic. Soeks 
non-materlallstlc, active woman. 
Straight hair a plus. #20270 

LADY'S MAN 

Single while male, 5*11", 180 lbs,, 
seeks attractive while female. 20s. 
If you like to be taken care of and 
water sports, I'm your man,#81 873 

HEY LADIES 

Single whlto male, 23, seeks fun- 
loving woman for companionship 
and a good time. I like music, 
movies and dub hopping, #43090 

ATTRACTIVE, 43 

Ex-hipp<o, desires attractive 
female, 35-45, for fun. Possible 
long-term relationship. II Interest- 
ed, ploaso call. #22364 

SINGLE WHITE MALE 

6*1", 23, alhletlc-build, anjoys 
sports, being with friends. Sooks 
attractive slnglo white female, 16- 
26, who enjoys boating, skiing, and 
romantic evenings. Call. #801 88 



TIRED OF THE BAR 
SCENE 

Single while malo, 23, 5'10". 185 
lbs., seeks slnglo white female, 18- 
24, attractive, athletic. Enjoys 

sports, walks on Ihe boach.#40250 



Make Some New Friends 




Call Personally Spaaklngll 



WOMEN SEEKING 



WHITE FEMALE, 50 

5'4", 160 lbs., 'aubum/grooji. Would 
liko to meet Christian man for din- 
ners, dancing, theatre, short trips, 
church. #43192 

CLASSIC, CHIC WOMAN 

Blonde, 5'5", energetic, attractive, 
educated, well traveled. Seeks 
well-groomed male, 40s, similar 

height, with sense ot humor. #20682 

SEEKS COLLEGE MAN 

While female, 18, wants lo moot 
man, 18-22. I am 5'4\ 125 lbs. 
Enjoy dancing, movies, volleyball, 
being with a outgoing guy. #80551 



I'M SICK OF LOSERS! 

While female, seeks romantic sin- 
gle/divorced while male, 25-35, lo 
have fun with. I am smart, Indcporv 
donl, with much lo share. #20047 

SINGLE WHITE FEMALE 

Seeking single white male, 30-39,. 
Enjoys boating, Ira voting, Ihe finer 
things In life. I'm wailing, #81844 

SINGLE MOM OF TWO 

Seeks white man, 30-43, financial- 
ly and emotional stable. I am whlto, 
35. I love kids, sports, camping, 
and cuddling. #43084 

NO MORE TIME ALONE 

Attractive lady 81 -years-young. 
Enjoys walks, quiet evanlngs at 
home, dinner out, travel and danc- 
ing. Please respond. #43147 

, LET'S GET CREATIVE! 
Single white female, 25, brown 
hair, hazel eyes. Loves animals, 
classic cars, walking. Soeks some- 
one lo have fun with. #20279 

ATTRACTIVE SINGLE 

Professional, degreed, secure, 
attractive, slnglo while lady, 57', 
120 lbs., groerVblonde, 30. Sooks 
attractive, professional, single, tall, 
alhlolic man, for friends possible 
relationship. #47876 

HEAD BANGERS 

Culo, Utile lady with long hair, 
Sooks cool dude with big half, 
Uko Panlom, Kiss or Tossla, This 
one's for youl #43091 



MATERIAL GIRL 

Living In a material world, looking 
for a material man. Only real "Boy 
Toy* types need lo reply. #22225 

TRUE ORIGINAL? 

Single white female, 24. Interests 
in art, fun, rock-rwotl and blues. II 
you use your brain, I'm a cheap 
date. I'm out of practice. #20241 

NO DORKS, PLEASE 

Looking for antl-BoavIs and Intel- 
lectual with decenl vocabulary to 
have colfeo and discuss lilo and 
ihe social order. #80261 

FRIEND IS A BLESSING 

Single while female, 35, looking for 
single male, 30-35, lor fun and 
adventure on a small hobby farm. 
Must be a church-goer. #21569 

SPECIAL SOMEONE? 

Very Intelligent woman looking for 
a very intelligent man. Have to be 
financially secure, honest and 
exciting. #43207 

LINDENHURSTLADY 

Active, Intelligent. '40s, seeks best 
In life: fun, romance, companion- 
ship, Lot's' find oul all about each 
other. If you think you're pretty 
good loo, call me. #40078 

WHITE FEMALE, 43 

Seeks lo meet whlto malo, 45-55. 
I'm a secretary, 5'4", blonde hair, 
who enjoys dancing, movies, 
spans, going for casual drink ond 
being wttn nice men. #40245 



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8anv9pm CST. 

The cost of the call is 
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this service you must be 
18 years old. Average 
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r 



5 Lines for 4 weeks FREE 

Mail to: Personally Speaking P.O. Box 780388, Wichita, KS 67278-0388 
or call 1-800-362-4799 or fax it to 1-800-597-9225 



r 



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CIRCLE ONE: Men Seeking Women Women Seeking Men 

Seniors Seeking Seniors Sports Interest Mutual Hobbies 



Lakeland Newspapers 



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Ads containing sexually expticit/imptlclt/anatomical language will not be accepted. The LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement. Ads may be submitted for 
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• ■?. 



46 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 





T & C METAL CO.-i 

We recycle aluminum canst 



W© also buy 
•Copper • Brass 
•Aluminum Siding 
•Auto Radiators 



Buyers of non-ferrous metals. 
Industrial accounts welcome. 



•Insulated Wire 
•Lead • Stainless 
•Batteries • Zinc 
•Catalytic Converters 

; 378 Prairie St. 
Crystal Lake, IL 



The Original #1 Name in 
Fence for Over 30 Years 

1 00 Ccdai Styles ■ Ctiain Link • Wioughl If on ■ PVC ■ Aluminum 



815-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl. 8-5; Sat. 8-1 



1 Blocks, of Hwy. 176 
Behind J & L Gas Station 



u 



FLOORS U WALK ON, inc 



Carpcu • Ilutlwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 
Kitchen & Balhroom Remodeling 

Retidcniial & Commercial tnilalLaicn 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Free Estimates 
(708) 356-2500 
(708) 310-5220 




iiiiiiiiiUiU 

*CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC.! 

Jk LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS & CONTRACTORS Jl 

A Saving LaOf County Since 1960 *■ 

* •Computer Design 'Seeding ; — 
, A 'Flagstone Patios -Sodding. ± 

A •Stone Walls 'Planting A 

* •Texture Gardens "Grading A 

1 (708) 746-8953 £ 



■3 



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Top Brand Names 
Unbeatable Prices 
Expert Installation 

DuPont stalnmaster 
Scotchgard Stalnrelease 

American Carpet Brokers 



■ I . ■-,-'. I 




» 



s 








PREPARE FOR FALL 
DRAFTS WITH 

WINDOW PAINES 

Putty & Paint Service 

Scraping • Painting • Putty 
Light Carpentry 



FREE ESTIMATES^ 
.;^\ (708) 336-7038 (^ 

s<Vy TTD Available 



-* L 



No Job rToo Small. Ill Do It All. 
•Remodeling 

Kitchens, Bathrooms & Rec Rooms 

fainting And Wallpapering 
►Flooring 

(All Types) 
•Siding And Roofing 

•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

ill Work Very Well Done 

FREE ESTIMATES, CALL 
(414) 537-2439 



COMPLETE TREE ■ 

SERVICE 

•Landscaping •Deadwood 
•Storm Damage •Trimming 
•Tree Removal •Hevation 
Yard cleaning for brush & 
overhanging branches 
REASONABLE FALL RATES 

1 00/0 OFF SENIORS 

GARTH UHWAT 

(708) 587-7551 
BOB ROGNSATD 

(708)395-8060 




HOME IMPROVEMENTS 
BASEMENTS 

• Competitive Prices 
•Quality Work 

• Kitchens - Baths 
•Closets/Shelves 

• Free Estimates 

SMALL JOBS OUR SPECIALTY 
(708)438-5975 








*■ -•*• WttM^fc 



m 



*JV* ******* ^Xftw, 

$F* From $259 ^?i* 

NO AFTOMEYS, FASF, SIMPU, NO WAIIING^C^ 

BUSINESS PLANS • RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 
WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 
(708) 548-1300 





RICHARDS 
PAINTING 



'3 




Top Quality Professional Work 
-Vety Reasonable Rates 
■Fully Insured 
•Wallpapering 
■Drywai I/Taping 
•Light Carpentry 
fiALL NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATE 

1-800-246-2720 



ALUMINUM 8 
VINYL SIDING 

Soffit & Fascia 
Window Trim • Vinyl 

Replacement Windows 
Work Guaranteed 

Insured -Free Esti mates. 
25 yrs. Experience 

i. EAGLE SIDING GO. 

(708)526-7222; 



■■■I ■•■< 






Visit Our Showroom & Factory 
Meier's Fence 

Froa In Home CK^ 
Estimates 726-7665 SB7-7711 

B00-824-1857 lakezubich fox lake 




BASEBALL CAPS! 



Polyester, Mesh Back 

Light or Dark Fronts 

$2.49 each! 

144 or more with imprint. 



Call ITEMS and IDEAS (708) 438-7488 



rlday, October 1, 1993 



EXCAVATING 

& 

BACKHOE SERVICE 

•foundations & Additions Dug 
•Shrubs & Fences Removed 
•Garages & Sheds Tom Down 
•Concrete & Blacktop Driveways Removed 
•General Cleanup 
Small jobs wekomt/FREE Estimates 



CONCRETE 
WORK 

iDRIVEWAYS 
WALKS 
PATIOS 
CURBS 



iARAGE SLABS 

20 years experience 
C7QB) 356-1724 



How you get there is just as important as where you're going" 



•Distinct, Personal and 
Reliable Service 

•Full Equipped 
Limousines 

•Custom Wedding 



ffi 



Packages 

Amber %r- 

Limousine Service, Inc 



•Daily & Nightly Charters 
■Proms & Sporting Events 
•Frequent Rider Bonuses 
•Senior Citizen Discounts 
CASH ORTRAVELER'S 
CHECKS ONLY 
FOR YOUR 
RESERVATION CALL 

800-286-6816 



|(708) 837-6290 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



.ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS 'DOORS 

DECKS* AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Wbrfr 



(414)279-6653 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 




Adult & Pediatric Allergy 



DR. DANIEL YAMSHQN 




•ASTHMA 
•HAY FEVER 



'HIVES 
•HEADACHES 



•ECZEMA 
•FOOD ALLERGY 



FREE ALLERGY SCREENING 




Buffalo Grove Round Lake Beach 

1 50 Half Day Rd. 2 East Rollins Rd. 

(708) 913-0300 (708) 546-5800 

24 Hour Ana. Service J312) 989-8729 



STAGG ASSOCIATES, INC. . . - 

SPEOALISTIN HOME AND REMODELING PLANNING 

PATSTAGG .- v- 1 

^ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTSMAN | 



m 



VI 



APPROVED, STAMPED^WORiaNG^RAWINGS^ 
^p^|^|5|7a^ FAX(708^5frr8747j 



P _ " ^ 



_». ■ ■: 



Piano Tuning 
& Repair 

Call John 
(708) 548-1403 




RICKTHE 
HANDY GUY 

'For Quality Workmanship' 
We will do tno smal Jobs no one 

wants, and the big lobs 
everybody does, we just do it 

10% OFF WITH THIS ad! 

FREE (708) 540-7890 

ESTIMATES (815) 5*4-5768 

• Plumbing • Kitchen ft Baths • Decks 
I • Electrical • Carpentry • Painting * Basements 



Time To 




1 


t Clean 


DEPENDABLE 


House? 


CLEANING 


V 


SERVICE 


\ Let Us 


. 


\ DoIt 


• Expert Home, 


\ ^ or 


Apartment & 


\ Ynu! 


Office Cleaning 






ANYSEE-RETEREKCES 






FieePfcoBeBUmuej 






(708)263-1557 



J 



GINOW 
DECORATING 

Light Carpentry 

Call Now 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rates 

Fully Insured 

Quality Work with Written 

Guarantee 



J 



' JACK'S fl 
REMODELING 

Siding • Soffit • Windows 
Decks • Bathrooms • Basements 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 
CALL JACK AT 

(708) 546-3759 




Colonial 



CONTRACTORS 



COMPLETE REMODELING 
SERVICES 

ALUMINUM SIDING. GUTTERS. 
DECKS. GARAGES. ADDITIONS, 
KITCHENS and BATHROOMS 
708-973-2120 



johnCrr-OiuiH- 



f 
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COUPON-' 



^mmmmsiGN&iSM^Fmi^G^m i 



r-== i = °™ 
BUYING 

Aluminum Cans 

♦COPPER *BRASS 
"AUTO RADIATORS 
*LEAD 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708)587-0788 

HOURS: 

Mon. - FN. 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m. -1 p.m. 

closed 12-12:30 for lunch 



Receive 2« MORE per po 
over our current prices 
|V^fc_ aluminum cans 

i^-^- 

j Expires 10-31-93 



r pound V 
Ices on I 



I 



Lakeland Newspapers 47 



i 

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1 

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SCHNEIDER 
BUILDERS 

Additions -Kit & Baths remodeled 
'Garages "Dormers 

•Decks 'Handyman Services 

FREE EsTi mates 
CAllToby at 
(708)546-4311 



For Ihe Finest 
in Custom Work 



1 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS i 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 
33261 N. Highway 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 
(708) 223-8691 




»U»l&jft 




- Is Shopping * 
A Chore For You? 

We offer a variety ofieroieeia^ 
•GROCERY SHOPPING .^O. 
•GIFT SHOPPING ^Q 
•ERRAND RUNNING '^gU, 

I IT'S AFFORDABLE! jm 
||/ (708) 949-3170 £j§ 



E&AHOME 
>ROVEME] 

Kitchens • Baths • Decks 
Room Additions 

\N0 job too small 

{ free estimates I 

(708) 526-3976 



HEATING & 
COOLING 

LENNOX - 

DUALITY HIGH EFFICIENT 
AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE 

•10 POINT SUMMER EFFICIENCY 
CHECK 

•AIR CLEANERS-WATER HEATERS 

•HUMIDIFIERS 

'COMPElJin* Pnas 

(708) 526-6286 
(815)459-2300 

L Serving Your Community 
J> % SALES-SERVICE 

V An Independent Lennox Dealer 
^ For 25 Years. 

Locally over 40 years. 



Financing 

Available 



24 Hour 
Service 



BORS1C & SON 
LANDSCAPING 

Landscape Contractors 

and Maintenance 

Slit Seeding 

Complete Renovation 

•Seeding *Sodding 
•Trees "Shrubs 
•Topsoll •Woodchips 
Free Estimates 
(708)662-3134 




Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 
(708) 740-8800 

Hound Lake Park 




RENTAL imc 



PIEESOftS 

Heating a Cooling 

24 hour Service 
Sales & Installation since 1 959 



Professional Furnace 

Cleaning 
$15.00 OFF Fall Special 

reg. $63,00 Now $48.00 



(708) 872-5353 



iHMBHaaonaa 




*fc 



1 "PRIVATE AFFAIRS" HEMYS INSIDE 
S BANOUETHALL fil / S T fiAGE 

J Location Long late chain a LAKES AREA 
1 ParffeS Of 75-200 BOBHEANEY 
B (708) 587-7606 

1 -Boats, Cars or Trucks- 

S Seasonal or RV Equipment, 
5 Snowmobiles, Motor Homes 



YVONNE'S 




HOUSE CLEANING 

•Personalized, Reliable Cleaning 
at a Reasonable Price. 

•Supplies Furnished and 
English Speaking. 

•House & Office Cleaning. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 
Fully Insured & Licenses 

(708)816-1928 



4 

I ■ 



ft. VI 



f Replacement Windows 



BAY & BOW WINDOWS 
STORM WINDOWS A DOORS j 
ENTRANCE DOORS 
PATIO DOORS 

i WINDOW SPECIALISTS 
BiCC'i Bnaallalionl 

We Soil, Install fk Repair 

708-546*2008 

SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT 



atfvaaigsby&#% 

T>- PSYCHICSCONSWIANT ** 

She dgctn't l»lk to pie»« you. 

but ihi lelh lh« inith, good or bad, 

Shi t«n tell >h« P«it. VtMMt.ua 

piedlct the fuluic. Dm to ANNA i 

Psychic abfliir lha einiolv* your tiouMw. 

•Builncw /iSr^N "Alcohol 

•IJOVO I CHARACTER' 

■Marital M 

►Financial t£9v 

ALL READINGS $10.00 

(708) 255-6010 

Located In Arlington Hgts. 

Book Now For Halloween Parties! 



'Drug 

•Weight 

'Health 



ADAMS 
HARDWOOD 

FLOORING 

Boarders Free Fully 

to Rare Woods Estimates Insured 



Installing • Sanding • Refinlshing 
Round Lake (708)740-0718 j 



JACK COLLINS -INSURANCE 

25357 W. PARK COURT 
LAKE VILLA, ILLINOIS 60046 

(708)356-3135 

A resident ofChcsnoy Shores for 18 years! 
IMEDICARE SUPPLEMENT , 

LONG TERM CARE (nursing home) 
AT HOME CARE 
LIFE INSURANCE 
MEDICAL INSURANCE (ages tinder 65) 
SMALL CROUP HOSPITALIZATION 




pflWG/A/Cl 
HUMIDIFIERS 



furnaces & Air Conditioners 

Installed & Serviced 

Honeywell »Trlon 

Rheem •Aprllarle 

• Plus other brands available 

COMPETITIVE PRICES 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Cl«G< 3 nAxiiJjvuU^ Jtuu 
=^ (708) 438-5^75 »lnce 1984 



JP 




FREE ESTIMATES 

INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR 
RESrorI>rnAL/COMMERCIALflNDUSTRlAL 

WELL BEAT ANY ESTIMATE BY 10% . 

PAINTINO. PAPERING & POWER WASHWO. 

WE ARE FULLY INSURED & LICENSED & 

ALL WORK IS FULLY GUARANTEED. 

~> CALLUSTODAYl 

(S PHONE (T708/526-7308 

rsamwa i(8O0)580-97O0 



TROPP 
GREEKHOUSIE 

•Fresh cut (lowers - , 3 M a bunch 
•Potted plants of all kinds 
•Perennial plants 
3" Peat Pots - 95* each 

SMllcsnorth of Long Grow 
1/2 mile north of Route 22 

m Old Mdlenry Road. 




DUNCAN 
PAINTING 

interiors/Exteriors 
FREE ESTIMATES 

Insured Quality Work ; ; 
References - Top Line Materials | 

WE DO OUR OWN WORK 

Call Preston 
(708)566-1002 



tur 

Cc 

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Th 

I re< 
j fi\ 
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P^BOSl 






Leafblad Grading 
& Concrete 

• Backhoo and Bobcat work 

• Cr n vol Driveway* 

• Landscape work 

• Stono, sand, topsoll delivery 

• Tree removal/lot clearing 

-CONCRETE- 

• Removal , 

• Installation 

(708) 356-3050 

"No job too kmail to appreciate 
or loo large to mitimala * 




OPTIMUM 

PAINTING DECORATING 

Expertise In all wall coFerings. j 

Fine Decorative Painling 'Multi-colored spray 
•Staining 
Dry waD Repair 

' "Yaui Sold/action Is My fluiinea' 




708/263-1504 



Frw estimateflriaif eo-Gfodiat* d 
U.S.School of ProhoiJonjl Paparhongjrtg 



1 




ft DeeoratMUg I 

fe eWallpaper Hanging I 
A •Int/Ext Painting g 
I FREE ESUMATES g 

n All work insured & g 
i guaranteed 

I (815) 3M-8613 J 



Custom Decks, Patios, & Walks 

By Outdoor Living Specialties 

CONSULTATION & DESIGN 

Free Estimates! Also Available: 

Full Line of Maintenance for Decks 

• Water Seal • Restoration • Staining 

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for all types of roofing, 

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Reasonable rates, 

licensed & insured. 

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A Pressure Washing $» 

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•Fences •Docks + 

Pressure Treated Wood is - 
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& (708) 395-8428 £. 



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WORKERS 

All work guaranteed. No job too big 
or too small. Free est. 40 yrs. exp. 

QUALITY WORK AT 
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Also we do patch work & remodel 

work and water damage repair.' 

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SPECIALISTS 



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Personal Attention To 
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48 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1 , 1993 



6 f 



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Vernon Hills 

The "Spirit Moves" Liturgical Dance group will be fea- 
tured at Faith Community Church on Sunday, Oct. 3. Faith 
Community has a "Family Sunday" service on the first 
Sunday of the month, featuring an intergenerational service. 
The "Spirit Moves" group is from Crystal Lake and is di- 
rected by Missy Spengel, They have been performing for 
five years and have now formed a children's group, "Chil- 
dren of the Lord." Faith Community Church, United 
Church of Christ holds their service at 11:15 a.m. and is Vcvnon HHlS 
located at 21 Hawthorn Pkwy (Temple Or Shalom). Call 
367-0071 for more information. 



beginning of each service. A "Celebration Time" for 
children and youth begins at 10 a.m. Adult Sunday classes 
also begin at 10. Youth groups meet on Sunday evenings 
with the junior high starting at 4 p.m. and the senior high 
at 6:30. '• 

On Sunday, Oct 3 Pastor Jim Scorgie will deliver a 
sermon, entitled "Gospel." 



Libertyville 

The United Methodist Church of Libertyville, 429 
Brainerd Ave., will hold its Sunday morning services at 
8:45 a.m.; 11 aim. and 6:30 p.m. (informal service). 
Children's Sunday School begins 15 minutes after, the 



St. Gabriel's Church announces Sunday service for 
confirmations and baptisms with the Right Reverend Frank 
T. Griswold, the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of 
Chicago. Service begins at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Oct 17 at 
the Hawthorn Middle School in Vernon Hills on Route 60 
and Aspen Drive. Join the members of St Gabriel's for 
Eucharist followed by a special reception and time to greet 
Bishop Griswold. For more information contact Fr. Paul 
Heal at 367-5510. 



ghair^ofLakeg 

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH 
SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP 10.45 

Special Groundbreaking Celebration 

Combined Worship Service 

Sunday School at 9.45, Children's Church at 10.45, 
Nursery and Cry Room for all services 

NO SUNDAY EVENINGS SERVICE 

Don Sweeting, Senior Pastor 
23201 W. Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, 838-0103 



PET PfiRfiDE 




Try three R's of obedience in dog training 



H 



There are few things 
more frustrating to a pet 
owner than a dog who is 
disobedient. If Spot re - 
fuses to come, sit, or stay 
on command, try the 
three "r's" of obedience 

training. 

According to Dr. Ian 

Dunbar, of the Center for 
Applied Animal Behavior 
in Berkeley, California, 
the basis of dog obedi- 
ence training involves re- . 
quest, response, and re- 
ward. Dogs that receive a 
reward for responding 
$ appropriately to a given 
request will continue to 
perform the desired be- 
havior. For example, If a 
pet owner makes a 
request if the dog 
responds favorably, and 
the owner rewards the 
dog, then the dog will 
continue to perform the 
behavior upon request. 
But, it Is Important that 
the request, response, and 
reward repeatedly occur 
in the same order so that 
the dog understands why 
It Is being rewarded. 
"Rewards must be ef- 
M fective, immediate, and 
I not too exciting, " says 
I Dunbar. "Punishments 
S must be effective, imme- 
I diate, instructive, not too 
^ overbearing, and admin- 
istered every time the dog 
misbehaves. Re- 
ward-training, therefore, 
is easier, more efficient, 
more effective, and more 
'enjoyable compared with 



punishment training." 

According to Dr. Dun- 
bar, praise is the most ef- 
ficient reward, and In- 
structive reprimands are 
the most efficient pun- 
ishments. It Is important 
to warn the dog before 
using additional punish- 
ment If the dog is not 
warned beforehand, It 



cannot learn the meaning 
of the warning. 

In the art of dog train- 
ing, a lure is often used to 
entice the dog to perform 
a desired response. The 
lure may be food or a toy. 
It can be used to entice 
the dog into the preferred 
place or position. The dog 
hears the request, sees the 



lure, and responds ap- 
propriately. The lure is of- 
ten given as the reward. 

The American Animal 
Hospital Association is an 
international organiza- 
tion of more than 10,000 
veterinarians which will 
study obedience training 
at a conference this sum- 
mer. 



rmrrbei 

JBKk 

American Boa/ding 
Kenrato Association 

BARK 'N' TOWN 
KENNELS 

•Boarding 
J -Grooming -Pet Supplies 

MAKE YOUR HOLIDAY MSERVmONS NOW. 
27607 W. Brandenburg Rd., Ingteside 

(815) 385-0632 

Hours: Mon., wed.. Fri. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 
Tugs., Thurs., Sal 6 a.m. - Noon * {other times by appointment) 





Office Hours By Appointment 

Open Daily 8 am • Wed & Sat 'til Noon 
Closed Sun 

ANIMAL CARE CENTER OF LAKE VILLA 





EDWARD V. MCCINNISS, D.V.M, 

101 S. Milwaukee Ave. 

Lake Villa, 1L 60046 

Telephone: (708) 3S6-VETS (8387) 



* 



B.C. DOG TRAINING 
GROOMING AND 
PET SUPPLY 




WHY PEOPLE 
NEED PETS 

In their classic book 

Between Pets and 

People: The 

Importance of Animal 

Companionship, Dr. 

Alan Beck and Dr. 

Aaron Katcher list nine 
important ways ani- 
mals increase their 
owners' health and 

resistance to disease: 

1. They provide companion 
ship. 

2. They give us somelhing 
to caro lor. 

3. They provide pleasurable 
activity. 

4. They are a source ot 
constancy in our chang- 
ing lives. 

.5. They make us leel sale. 



• 



FOUR PAWS 

TRAINING CENTER 

"Positive Training With Positive Results" 

All training methods are not alike. Come visit us during classes and 
observe a different approach to dog training. Our methods utilize food, 
enthusiasm and praise, and exercises are broken down into pieces both 
dogs and owners can manage. We have classes tor puppies and older 
dogs, and for all levels of obedience competition training. For more 
Information please give us a call. 

NEXTTEHM STARTS 



Q0UR5E 


SCHEDULE 


General Obedience: 




•Puppy Kindergarten • 


Thu. 6:30 PM or 




Sat. 10 AM 


•Basic Obedience 1 • 


Thu. 7:30 PM or 




Sit. 11 AM 


•Basic Obedience II • 


Thu. 6:30 PU 


Competition Classes: 




•Novice (CD Tine) - 


Mon. 7 PM or Thu. SAM 


•Open (CDX Title) - 


Mon.8PMorThu.10AM 



Decembers 
November 6 
December 9 
November 6 
December 9 

December 6 or 9 
December 6 or 9 



20970 White Road • Antioch, IL 60002 « (708) 838-0523 



* 



Freedom Fence 

Electronic Dog Containment System 




Keep your dog in 
your yard AND out 
of your garden (or 
wherever you 
choose). 



708/726-1100 



ANNOUNCES 

FUN FILLED EVENTS! 

•Wednesday, October 6, 1993 

CONFORMATION FUN MATCH 

JUDGE - MR. STAN MATSUMOTO 

DOORS OPEN AT 6:45 P.M. 

JUDGING STARTS AT 7:00 P.M. 

(NO MAJOR POINTED DOGS PLEASE) 

•Saturday, October 16, 1993 
CANINE GOOD CITIZEN TEST 

AND 
TATTOO CLINIC 

HOURS - 9 : 00AM - 5 : 00PM 

CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO 
MAKE AN APPOINTMENT 

(708)566-1960 



day, October 1, 1993 



Lakeland Newspaper* 49 



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NATURE'S BOUNTY 




Fried apples with curry 

This is a great side dish or relish for 
any kind of meat course. The flavor is 
mild but sweet, and the curry sets the 
natural sugar of the apples. 
4 apples (Granny Smith are best, but 
any can do) 

1 medium yellow onion, peeled and 
sliced thin 
3 Tbls. butter 
1 TbI. curry powder 
salt and pepper to taste 

Core and wedge the apples with an 
apple/pear corer-cutter or do the same 
by hand. Heat a frying pan and saute 
the onions with the butter until they are 
clear. Add the apples and sautg until 
the apples are not quite tender. Add 
the seasonings and toss. 




Apple beef brisket 

Viewers send me recipes all the 
time. Most of the time I am very anx- 
ious to try such offerings. On occasion, 
though this is rare, someone will send 
me a list of prepared mixes that he or 
she blends together to get a. . .dish of 
some sort. Not so with this offering. It 
takes a while to cook, but you can do 
much of the work ahead of time. It is 
very good. 

1 beef brisket, 4-5 pounds, trimmed of 
fat 

1 large yellow onion, peeled and 
quartered 

2 large cloves garlic, peeled and 
chopped 

10 cloves garlic, whole . 

1 jar (10 ounces) apple jelly 
1/3 cup dry white wine 

3 Tbl.s Dijon mustard (Grey Poupon is 
fine) 

2 green onions, chopped 
1/2 tsp. salt 

3/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 
3/4 tsp. curry powder 
1 cup apple juice 
1/4 cup chopped parsley, for garnish 

Place the brisket, onion, chopped 
garlic and garlic cloves in a large Dutch 
oven. Add water to cover and bring to a 
boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 2 
1/2 hours, or until the brisket is tender. 
Drain brisket. (If you wish you can keep 
the brisket covered with the water and 



refrigerate it overnight. This will help 
prepare for the next day.) 

In a small saucepan mix together 
the apple jelly, wine, mustard, green 
onions, salt, pepper and curry powder. 
Heat until the jelly melts. (This can be 
done in your microwave in just min- 
utes.) 

Place brisket in a shallow roasting 
pan and brush some of the jelly mix- 
ture over the top. Bake at 325 degrees 



t%JI 






IPICK! 



for 45 minute, basting 3 or 4 times with 
the remaining jelly mixture. 

Remove the meat to a platter -to 
keep warm. Place the pan on a hot 
burner and deglaze with the apple 
juice. Reducethe juice for a moment 
and place in a gravy boat Serve along- 
side the meat 

Slice brisket and serve with parsley 
garnish. 

Serves 8 to 10 



ZIEGLER'S 
ORCHARD 



JONATHAN'S, MACINTOSH, BANANA APPLES, 
RED & GOLD DELICIOUS 



'J\>$4-ftii ', '•■/,*-'-• 



PICKING SEA3^p 

Sat. & Sun. 9*5, Open Columbus Day 

■■;l Starting 9/25 & 26 until October 3 is t 






Ready-picked apples & pears, tart frozen cherries, apple pastries, 

FRESH PRESSED CIDER, honey, pumpkins, squashes, gourdes, 

{lowers & plants, colorful mums & all sorts of fall decorations. 

(708)546-1228 

Our FAMOUS STRUDEL, Give the BEST, Unlike the Rest 

We <velocaiMWofGrayskdceonBaconR±,JustSofHwy. 120&2 miles WqfHalnesvilLe 









FALL VEGETABLES & APPLES 

NOW READY 

Squash Peppers Beans Cabbage 

Tomatoes Potatoes 

Fresh Cut Flowers 

HARDY GARDEN MUMS IN FULL BLOOM 
FRESH APPLE CIDER 

RICHARD STILE'S VEGETABLE FARM 

11717 Sheridan Road, Kenosha (1 mile N. of State line) 
OPEN Daily 9-6, (414) 694-5256 

HALLOWEEN DISPLAY OPENING SOON 




PICK YOUR OWN VEGETABLES 

M 
;Call (414) 694-5256 for crops available 








^-JtixxJlazJl/ 



THE 
NURSERY & GAR.DEN SHOP 

lii 




Free Design Assistance 

Pre-Dug Trees & Shrubs 

Firewood • Bulbs 

We Plant Or You Plant 




with coupon • North Chicago Chalet only 



■SINCE 1917- 



THE CHALET NURSERY & GARDEN SHOPS 

22nd Street & Hwy. 41 In North Chicago 

I7Q81 688-0565 



PICK YOUR OWN 

GOLDEN DELICIOUS 

& PUMPKINS 

BEGINNING SAT., OCT. 2ND 

•Jonathans Beginning Sept. 25 
•Red Delicious Beginning Oct. 9th 

FRESH APPLE CIDER 

Visit Our Country Smokehouse 

Featuring: Ham, Bacon, 
Sausage, Cheese 

36116 128th St. 
Twin Lakes, WI 53181 

414-877-2436 

OPEN DAILY 9 A.M. - 6 P.M. 







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DIRECTIONS: Take 173 W from Antioch. Take first road (Siedschlag) to right 
after stop sign. Go to the end of the road & turn left 2 miles to Orchard. 



50 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



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Pendleton sprints his way to standout status 



Each day, Kenye Pendleton can count on 
a challenge from Titus Mason as the two 
Carmel running backs duel in the 40-yard 
dash. 

"I usually win," Pendleton said. 

The one-on-one battles are important as 
the Corsairs prepare each week to throw 
their triple threat offense against.the oppo- 
sition. After three games, Pendleton has 



by STEVE PETERSON 

.Lakeland Ni-uspapi'is 



been just one of the Carmel weapons ca- 
pable of breaking one, as he as 78 and 72- 
yard touchdown' runs as Carmel won two 
of three games. 

"You need that quick burst," Pendleton 
said. 

Pendleton knew early on in his football 
career he had the speed to make those 
jaunts. Just ask any player who played 
against the Waukegan Chiefs in the late 
1980s. "I was always the tallest and, 
fastest," Pendleton said. 

Going into the St. Joseph game last 
week, Pendleton had reached the 326-yard 
mark on 20 carries. 

"We always knew he was going to be 
good," Carmel Coach Mike Fitzgibbons 
said. "He is better in games than in 
practice." 

Pendleton likes to imitate the style of 
Philadelphia Eagles QB Randall Cunning- 
ham, "He improvises and that is what I 
like to do," Pendleton said. 

Pendleton, a Waukegan resident, has had 
to make changes this year due to the sea- 
son-ending injury to Erik Janseens and in- 
juries on' the offensive line. But B. J. 
Coleman and Matt Larocca have filled in 
ably, the running back commented. 

Pendleton and the Corsairs traveled to the 



Knox College "passing camp .to learn the 
new high tech offense. 

"That is when he first introduced it. That 
is what I First liked it. It spreads the de- 
fense out. It does not contain you. We 
used to run a wing 
T. This is more balanced. You have two 
guys instead of one. You do not have one 
guy carry the bulk of the load," Pendleton 
said. 

"You have to adjust. I was on the right 
side, but I can hide behind Larocca (6-4). 

The 16-17 yards a carry surprises me be- 
cause of the injuries on the line. I did not 
think I was going to get the ball that 
much," Pendleton said. 

"I hope teams key on me. I get the ball 
like 15-20 percent of the time, so if they 
key on me, someone will do something," 
Pendleton said. 

"I can't say any defense has stopped us. 
Marian Catholic caused a lot of turnovers, 
but we made a lot of mistakes on our 
own," Pendleton said. 

Working with a running threat like quar- 
terback junior J.R. O'Campo helps. "J.R. 
is smart. He is comfortable with pitching 
the ball on the option. They say when the 
defense goes slow, you go fast, when the 
defense goes fast, you go slow," Pendleton 
said. 

This is a Thursday afternoon at the 
Mundelein High School and the standout 
running back will be going through his 
normal ritual before a game against previ- 
ously winless St. Joe. Pendleton has been 
preaching that the Corsairs cannot look 
past their East Suburban Catholic Confer- 
ence opponent, although he is confident 
with a healthy club, the Corsairs can make 
a run for the league title. 

"During the day, I can talk normally and 
go through the school day, and do a lot of 
stretching and get everything ready for 3 



p.m. When the 3 p.m. bell sounds, I am a 
different person on the field," Pendleton 
said. 
Pendeleton went out for the basketball 
team his freshman year, but did not make 



the cut and did not follow in his father's 
footsteps in Waukegan. Instead, he con- 
centrates on track and field in the spring, 
as he will be running in the 100, 200, 400 
and mile relay. 




Carmel Corsairs senior running back Kenye Pendleton runs for more yardage as 
he and his teammates are beginning to run up high offense totals with head 
coach Mike Fitzgibbon's new "triple option" offense. Pendleton is averaging 
more than 1 5-yard a carry this season.— Photo by Gene Gabry. 



Carmel 1 s 'triple option' scores 50, si 



Carmel 50, St. Joseph 22 

CarmePs quarterback J.R. O'Campo ran for 
: two touchdowns and passed for a third in CarmGl's 
f 50-22 victory over St. Joseph in an East Suburban 
1 Catholic Conference game in Mundelein. Scoring 
I for (he Corsairs were Nick Yeager, a 22-yard field 
l goaJ and two touchdowns. Hamilton, on a 13-yard 
pass from O'Campo, Mason, twice on 25 and 13- 
yard scoring runs. 

Cary-Grove 16, Lake Zurich 3 

The Lake Zurich Bears offense managed 182 
I total yards, but only one field goal in three chances 
[inside the Cary-Grove 20-yardline and fell to the 



highly rated Trojans 16-3 in Lake Zurich. Arik 
Eggleston's 26-yard field goal was the only score 
for the Bears against their Fox Valley Conference 
foes. 



Fenton 18, Mundelein 6 

Mundclcin's offense wailed until late in the 
fourth quarter to get a score and fell to Fenton 1S-6 
in a North Suburban Conference game in 
Mundelein. The Mustangs only score came on 
quarterback Mike Hodges' 1-yard sneak into the 
end zone. A two-point conversion attempt fell 
incomplete. 




Montini 26, Wauconda 7 

Wauconda's quarterback Chris Van Alstine 
showed the Bulldog faithful his strong throwing arm 
and connected with Cory Kazimour for a 57-yard 
scoring pass early in the second half, but Montini's 
strong running game proved loo much for the 0-4 
Bulldogs as they fell 26-7 in Wauconda. Wauconda 



Football Report 



, 







Lakeland Newspapers Prep Player of the Week 

O'Campo stars 
in 50-22 romp 

• Carmel junior quarterback- J.R. 
O'Campo showed his emerging star 
qualities against St. Joseph when he ran 
for two scores and threw for another in a 
50-22 Carmel victory. O'Campo's efforts 
earned him Lakeland Newspapers Player 
of the Week honors, the first Carmel 
player to do so in 1993. 

. O'Campo, a 5*9", 150-pound 
quarterback, runs the controls for the 
Carmel "triple option" offense, which is a 
variation on the standard option where the 
defense can never key on just one running 
back. 

Carmel improved its season record to 
3-1 and 2-0 in the East Suburban Catholic 
Conference. 

Congratulations to O'Campo, Head 
Coach Mike Fitzgibbons and to the entire 
Carmel Corsairs varsity football team for 
the Lakeland Newspapers Player of the vtnmeirr^asT- — 
Weekaward. J * K * ucar[1 P 




hosts Northwest 
Grayslake this 
homecoming game. 



Suburban 
weekend 



Conference rival 
in Wauconda's 



St. Edward 20, Grayslake 19 

Dan Dillon's Grayslake Rams team posted its 
highest offensive output of the season and look a 
13-7 lead into halftime, but a 14-point fourth 
quarter blitz by visiting St. Edward (Elgin) and a 
missed extra point kick by the Rams on the 
apparent go ahead touchdown caused the Rams to 
drop to 0*4 and lose to the Green Wave 20-19. 
Scoring for the Rams were Mike Spychala, a I- 
yard run, Jay Horvalh, a 17-yard pass from Jason 
Lake, and Lake on a 20-yard run. 

Libertyville 7, Stevenson 6 
(in overtime) 

Stevenson head coach Bill Mitz's decision to go 
for a game winning two-point conversion in 
overtime against a stingy Libertyville defense 
proved fatal as the Wildcats stopped the Patriots 
Faraji Leary on an off-tackle play and hung on to 
defeat Stevenson 7-6 in probably the most exciting 
game in the North Suburban Conference this 
season. Libertyville improved its record to 4-0 in 
the NSC, while Stevenson dropped to 1-2, 2-2 on 
the season. After the game ended with a 0-0 tie, 
both teams attempted to score from the 10-yard 
line. Libertyville's Andrew Robertson scored from 
the 5-yard line to draw first blood. Leary scored 
two plays later to close the gap and the scoring at 
7-6. 

Antioch 13, North Chicago 

Antioch continued its improved play by beating 
the North Chicago Warhawks 13-0 in a steady rain 
at Antioch and improved its record to 2-2 on the 
season and 2-1 in the North Suburban Conference. 
Scoring for the Sequoils were Mike Ipscn, on a 
three-yard run and Mike Stephenson on a five-yard 
run. 



St. Joseph 

Lake Forest 7, Warren 

Warren's offensive line was not able to protect 
quarterback Tony Largo, who was sacked five 
limes, and Lake Forest's defense held the Blue 
Devil offense to only 12 total yards as the Scouts 
defeated Warren 7-0 in a steady rain in Lake 
Forest. The Warren running game was reduced to 
minus 15-yards rushing on the day. Warren 
dropped 10 2-2 on the season. 1-2 in- the North 
Suburban Conference. 



Driscoll 48, Round Lake 20 

The Round Lake Panther went into halftime 
lied in their home opener with Driscoll 20-20, but 
the Round Lake defense gave up five consecutive 
scores in the second hatf to fall to the non- 
conference visitors 48-20. Scoring for the 1-3 
Panthers were Bob Swanson, a one-yard run, 
Bobby Tcltez, a 54-yard run, and brent Bums, a 
three-yard run. Round Lake opens the Northwest 
Suburban Conference season on Oct. 2 at home 
against Johnsburg. 



Marmion 20, Grant 7 

Grant ended its four-game non-conference 
season 0-4 as they dropped another heartbreaker 
20-7 against Marmion Academy. Bulldog 
quarterback Shawn Powers scored the lone grant 
touchdown on a five-yard run to cap an impressive 
first drive for the Bulldogs. Grant opens its 
Northwest Suburban Conference schedule against 
Marion Central on OcL I, 



St. Francis 26, Johnsburg 20 

The 1-3 Johnsburg Skyhawks played a solid 
game but fell just short as Wheaton-St. Francis 
scored with :1 1 left in the game to defeat Johnsburg 
26-20. scoring for the Skyhawks were Chad 
Germann (2) an eight-yard pass from John Paul 
Dudley and a five-yard run. Scott Bierman also 
scored on a three-yard touchdown. The Skyhawks 
will face Round Lake on Oct 2 in their Northwest 
Suburban Conference opener. 

Richmond-Burton 17 
StUlman Valley 14 

The Richmond-Burton Rockets came back 
from a 14-3 deficit to win 17-14 in Stillman Valley. 
Scoring for the Rockets were Jeff Christcnsen, a 
25-yard field goal, Lucas Dehmlow, a three-yard 
run, and Eric Rasmusscn, a 38-yard pass from 
Christensen. Richond plays at Genoa on Oct 1. 






' 



I 






[Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 51 



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Friday, October 1,1993 



52 lakeland. Newspaper* 



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' 






Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 



Triple-threat option leads CHS to showdown in Joliet 



Carmel High's .football 
team will be using the old 
adage of "going with what 
brought you to the dance" 
when the Corsairs travel to 
Joliet' to take on East Sub- 
urban Catholic Conference 
rival Joliet Catholic at 8 
p.m. Oct. 1. 

"Not a thing will be 
different. I think that is a 



throw out of - I think we 
have the best of both 
worlds," Fitzgibbons said. 

The Corsairs went with 
the triple threat offense after 
first using it in a camp at 
Knox College this summer. 
Players experienced the 
strategy during Carmel's 
summer camp. 

"You can run up the 



multi-look offense. 

The Corsairs, had their fans 
planning the trip to Joliet 
with an explosive 30-point 
first half. 

The defense stopped a St 
Joe drive with the score 17- 
7, and O'Gampo jaunted for 
53 yards and a CHS score. 



mistake that everybody middle, outside, inside or 
makes and maybe I made it, throw," Fitzgibbons said. 



too. You change everything 
for Joliet. But we're a 
playoff team, too. They're 
great, and we will have to 
play a great game to beat 
them," Carmel Coach Mike 
Fitzgibbons said. 



" Yeager (Nick) and Mason 
are weapons running the 
ball and O'Campo is a force 
in himself," Fitzgibbons 
said. 

The Chargers had to try 
and defend all of that and 



The Corsairs triple-threat then some. Carmel gained 

offense was in fine form 290 yards rushing led by 75 

against winless St. Joseph yards and two touchdowns 

at home Friday, picking up by sophomore Nick Yeager. 

more than 350 yards in a It was the first score, a 13- . 

50-22 romp. The offense yard pass from O'Campo to 

has chalked up more than Pendleton, which turned the 

1,000 yards as Carmel is 3- game in Camel's favor, 

1 overall, 2-0 ESCC. O'Campo believes., That 

"Right after the first score, made it 10-0 after Yeager 

They were keying on Titus had scored three of his 19 

(Mason) and Kenye points. 

(Pendleton)," quarterback O'Campo audibled to 

J.R. O'Campo said of the adjust to what the St. Joe 

confidence. defense gave the. Corsairs, ; 

Carmel now has had a 50 . such as the pass to 

and a 42-point game. Pendleton. 

"You never envision 50 O'Campo played football 

points a game. I envisioned in the Waukegan Chiefs 

us getting the good players organization, like Pendleton 

the ball more in different and former QB turned 

ways. I also knew J.R. defender Tony Longmire. 

could run the option. An Longmire gives the hew 

option offense you can signal caller tips on the 



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Mason, a senior running 
back, scored the first of his 
two touchdowns on an 11- 
yard run for the whopping 
30-7 halftime margin. 
Yeager took - over in the 
third quarter, scoring on 
runs of 38 and seven yards. 
"Yeager is a good player," 



Fitzgibbons said. 

The Corsairs could not 
stop Jeron Hines. He had 
191, yards as his team also 
eclipsed the 300 yard mark. 
He scored all three St Joe 
touchdowns; 

The defense played well in 



key situations, with two 
interceptions and two 
fumble recoveries. 

"We made some mistakes, 
but these kids are so easy to 
work with," Fitzgibbons 
said. 




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Hanson going to World Series 
game even if White Sox do not 



With the Chicago White Sox 
clinching the American League 
Western Division title last week, 
numerous Lake County Sox fans are 
trying to figure out where they will be 
watching if the Sox get to the World 
Series later this month. 

As for me, I will be in front of my 




For 

the 

Record 

by THOMAS STEVENS 
Sports Editor 



50-inch television in the easy chair. 

But let me tell you a tale of a 
lucky White Sox fan who also won 
big last week, 

This lucky Lake Zurich native and 
Sox fan, however, will be attending a 
World Series game even if his beloved 
White Sox do not make it into the 
Fall Classic latter this month. 

How's that? .Well Lake Zurich's 



Duanne Hanson was named by MCI as 
the 1993 Chicago White Sox Fan of 
the Year and will be attending the 
World Series as a guest of MCI, along 
with 20 other Major League Baseball 
team's representatives. 

According to Hanson, he was not 
even supposed to go to the White Sox 
game on the night he was selected as 
Fan of Game and qualified for the Fan 
of the Year drawing and the prized 
World Series trip, that could include 
his White Sox. 
Talk about luck. 
Hanson said he has a friend who 
had an extra ticket to a Sox game 
earlier this season, but could not find 
anyone that could attend the game . 
with her. 

She tried her boy friend, several 
girl friends and co-workers before 
asking Hanson to attend late in the 
day, on the day of the game. 

For being selected Chicago White 
Sox Fan of the Year, Hanson will 
attend one of the four World Series 
games with three of his friends. 

. Maybe Duane will invite me to go 
along. Probably not. 



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MICHAEL F0HRMAN 
OF FOHRMAN DODGE 

Here's an amazing football 
fact. A son and his father were 
BOTH voted "Coach of the 
Year" in college football the 
SAME yearLJohnny Majors 
was voted "Coach of the Year" 
for major-college football in 
1973 when he coached 
Pitt— and his father, Shirley 
Majors, was voted ."Coach of 
the Year" in small-college 
football for his coaching at 
Sewance that same season. 

• • * 

One of the strangest things 
that ever happened in 
baseball was when a batter hit 
a fly ball that NEVER CAME 
D0WNL.lt happened at the 
indoor Minneapolis 
Metrodome on May 4, 1984 
when Dave Kingman of 
Oakland hit a high fly ball 
that got caught in the netting 
of the fabric ceiling of the 
domc.Thc ball stuck there 
! and didn't come down...Thc 
umpires decided it was a 
ground rule double. 

• * • 

Incredibly, a team in the 
National Football League once 
played a whole game without 
gaining ANY yardage!... 
Seattle, in a game against the 
Rams in 1979, had an official 
total of MINUS 7 yards rushing 
and passing for the entire 
day...UnbcIicvab!c, but true. 

• • * 

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Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspaper* 53 



■ 



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Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 






L-5 






I 



v\ 



m I 



Vikings offense keep pace ag 



Lake County Vikings will 
be seeking their seventh 
win in eight games when 
they host the Chicago Fal- 
cons at Round Lake High 
Oct. 2. 



The 6-1 semi-pro Vikes 
managed to defeat both 
Mother Nature and the 
Thunder 40-6 in Chicago. 

"Our offense is clicking 
and the defense looked out- 



standing, "\ player-owner 
Rick Starosta said. 

Carey Haith and Chris 
Tavajian both had two 
touchdowns. 

The passing game was a 



Johnson may get start vs. Purdue 



North Chicago native Johnny Johnson 
may start at quarterback for the University 
of Illinois Fighting Ulini when the team 
faces Purdue University in W. Lafayette 
in the team's Big Ten opener. 

Although head Coach Lou Tepper will 
make the final decision before game time, 
Offensive Coordinator Greg Landry said 
the Johnson probably would start at 
quarterback this weekend due to starting 
quarterback Scott Weaver's inability to 
lead the offense during the teams three 
straight losses over non-conference 
opponents. 

Football Standings 



Johnson entered the game for Weaver 
in the second quarter of the illini's 13-7 
loss to the Oregon Ducks and engineered a 
touchdown on the team's first possession 
with Johnson at the controls. Johnson 
was 13 for 33 with 190 yards on the day, 
including a 21-yard run, which was the 
Illini's longest of the season. Johnson's 
34-yard touchdown pass was the Illini's 
longest since 1991. 

The 0-3 start is the worst Illinois start 
to a season since 1972 when the Illini 
lost seven straight games before winning. 



Fox Valley Conference 




Fenton . 
ANTIOCH 


3-1 
2-2 


3-1 
2-2 


Overall Conf. 


STEVENSON 


2-2 


1-2 


Cary-Grove 4-0 


2-0 


WARREN 


2-2 


1-2 


Dundee-Crown 4-0 


2-0 


Zion-Benton 


1-3 


1-2 


Crystal Lake South 3-1 


2-0 


NORTH CHICAGO 1-3 


1-3 


McHenry 2-2 


1-1 


MUNDELEIN 


0-4 


0-4 


Crystal Lake Central 1-3 ' 


1-1 








Jacobs 2-2 
LAKE ZURICH 2-2 


0-2 
0-2 


Northwest Sub. 


Conference 


Woodstock 0-4 


0-2 




Overall 


Conf. 






Marian Central 


2-2 


0-0 






ROUND LAKE 


2-2 


0-0 


North Suburban Conference 


JOHNSBURG 


1-3 


0-0 


Overall 


Conf. 


GRANT 


0-4 


0-0 


LIBERTYVILLE 4-0 


4-0 


GRAYSLAKE 


0-4 


0-0 


Lake Forest 3-1 


3-0 


WAUCONDA 


0-4 


0-0 



force as Starosta caught 
four Jon Shoemaker passes 
for 66 yards and Frank Ruiz 
had two for 58 yards. 

"We were ahead 28-7 at 
halftime and it started to 
pour rain, so we stuck to 
the ground in the second 
half," Starosta said. 

The secondary could be 




tested when the Falcons 
come to RL High for the 6 
p.m. game. 

"They play an aggressive 
4-3 defense and try to rattle 
you on the line. They like 
to throw a lot of 40-yard 
and more passes," Starosta 
said. 

The best news of the week 



may have come at practice 
Tuesday, The Vikes learned 
the lights had been rewired. 
Flickering lights caused a 
stoppage of the Sept. 18 
game against the Chicago 
Heights Broncos. There is 
no word on when that and a 
Sept. 4 game with Palos 
will be made up. 



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MASTER NAK SUNG SONG - 7TH DEGREE BLACK BELT 



Mailer Nalc Sung Song It a native of 
Seoul, South Korea, wliere In 1959 tie 
began hit itudlef of Tae Kwon Do and 
Kung.Pu. He was appointed by the 
Korean government to train the 
kcpuhllc Mariner from 1971-1972, 
after which he returned ■ to the 
inouiiiain ichool to continue ,hl* 
philosophical and martial arts training. 

After completing the Technical 
Instructors: course, he, served as a 



martial arts Instructor in the Korean 
Marine Corpi. for three yean. 
Following that, be was appointed ai 
the Instructor for the Korean Police 
Force. 

Matter Song hat achieved the level 
or 7th degree black belt in Tae Kwon 
Do and Kung Fu. He If active In 
giving demonstration! and leaching 
self-defense - classes to adults and 
children. 



Song's Martial Artt Liitltulet ore 
located In Mundeleln, Antloch and 
Graytlake. The Inttitulet are membert 
In good s landing with Die World Tae 
Kwon Do Federation and the United 
Sinter of America Tae Kwon Do 
Union, which it a member of the 
Olympic Committee, The liulltulet 
ore alto membert of the Pan American 
Moo Dulc Kwon Federal Ion, 

Matter Song llvet by the 



philosophic of Tae Kwon Do. lilt 
contribution to society It to rebuild, 
enhance and strengthen each 
Individual 1 * character. lilt focus is to 
leach hit students not merely the 
physical aspects of martial arts, but 
the philosophical, artistic and cultural 
counterpart* (hat when used In 
combination will allow oneself to 
receive the full benefits of martial artt. 



Sign Up Now - Call 566-4665 



54 Lakeland Newspaper! 



We 1 re Opening 
Up A New 
Location In 
Mundeleln 
Starting In 
Mid-October 
...and We're 
Offering Special 
Savings For You! 







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Friday, October 1 , 1993 









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I 






rl 




Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 



Antioch continues T new ? 
streak with another win 



by THOMAS STEVENS 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Antioch Sequoit varsity head football 
coach Del Pechauer has his team on a 
"new" streak, however this streak is 
nothing like the one the Sequoit football 
team endured for the past two and a half 
seasons. 

With a 13-0 victory over the North 
Chicago Warhawks, the Sequoit winning 
streak continues at two and the season 
record improved to .500 at 2-2, 2-1 in the 
North Suburban Conference. 



"We have some talent on this team," 
said Pechauer. "This year's junior class 
was undefeated as sophomores last year. 
These kids can play." 

Improved play of quarterback Casey 
O'Connell and running backs Mike 
Stephenson and Kent Ipsen have improve 
the .team's overall outlook on the 
offensive side of the ball. 

On defense, Kenin Denzel and Derek 
Lang made big plays in the North 
Chicago game that helped end serious 
North Chicago scoring opportunities. . . 



Lindenhurst youth soccer 
teams continue to impress 



The first-place U-15 Blitz traveled to 
Geneva to face the Geneva Blue team in a 
IWSL Division A contest and played to a 
2-2 tie to remain undefeated in league 
play. The tie kept the team in first place 
and extended the streak of games without 
a loss to 20. Stacie Morely and Carrie 
Gofron scored goals for the Blitz. 

The U-13 Stars hosted the Fichte 
Rams and defeated them 3-0, despite this 
being the team's first year in the league. 
Led by. a strong defense of Becky 
Sosnowski, Sarah Rimkus, Amy Smit 
and Elly Elfering, held off the Rams and 
scored a shutout. Scoring goals for the 
Stars were Mandy Fasano, Cheri Case and 
Emily Ayre. The Stars are now 3-0 on the 
season and are in first place in their 
division. 

The U-13 Power played to a 2-2 tie 
against a tough team from St. Charles. 
Scoring goals for the Power were Kristina 
Giangiorgi and Jenny Barbera. 
Outstanding performers included Nicci 
Estep, Teri LaRouche and Traci Forster. 

Other girls traveling team scores 
include the U-19 Engma defeating Buffalo 
Grove 3-0, while the U- 11 Lightning lost 
1-0. 

The Lindenhurst boys traveling teams 
gained a win and three ties last weekend in 
Northern Illinois Soccer League action. 
The U-13 Eagles defeated the Hononegah 
Lions 3-1. Coach Ron Wetzel praised the 
aggressive play of Carl Wheeler, who 
scored two goals and controlled the 
midfield with Alex Burger. Justin Weeks 
turned in a strong performance in goal to 
help secure the victory. The Eagles season 
record is now 2-1. 

The U-14 Lazers fought to a scoreless 
tie in a home game against the Lisle 
Stingers. Coach Frank Marshall cited 
goalie Tim Chilcote as the team's 
outstanding player of the game with 17 



93 



saves. The Lazers travel to Rockford next . 
week. 

The U-12 Lightning faced the 
Glendale Heights American Eagles in a 
showdown of undefeated teams. When the 
dust has settled, the teams were still 
undefeated after a 3-3 tie. The Lightning 
midfield corps of Kevin Earl, Ryan 
Hlinak, Keli Owens, Scott Bender, and 
Kevin Nelson generated the scoring 
opportunities for the front line. Quinn 
Gooch, Matt Nolan, and Andy Lyon 
scored goals for the Lightning. 

The U-10 Royal Eagles traveled to 
Naperville and faced the Express, The 
game resulted in a 2-2_tie as Mike 
Persman and Kaleb Barrett scored goals 
for the Eagles. Good defense by Brian 
Harvey, Nate Rimkus, Ryan Jordan and 
Matt Boiler kept the pressure on 
Naperville the entire game. 

Lindenhurst 
ladies golf league 
crown winners 

The Lindenhurst Ladies Golf League 
ended its 22nd season at Countryside Golf 
Club in Mundelein, with 24 women from 
Lake Villa and Lindenhurst competing 
from May through August. The groups 
wasrd banquet will be oct. 2 at Hogan's 
restraurant at the Antioh Golf Club. 

Taking top golfer honors in the A 
flight was Diane Rogala, while Jean 
Agree finished second, and Suzi Dale 
finished third. B flight winners were 
winner Billie Porter, Georgeann 
Vanderheiden placed second and Debbie 
Egger placed third. Winning the C Flight 
was Jan Blanas, followed by Ellyn Lanz 
and Fae Cole. 




■1 



Lindenhurst Soccer 



Standings 
Boys 1st grade 



Antigua 

Venezuela 

Peru 

Chile 

Bolivia 

Trinidad 

Bahamas. 

Belize 



W 
9 
5 
6 
,3 
3 
3 
3 



L 
1 

2 
3 
4 
4 
5 
5 



T PTS 

18 
3 13 

1 12 
3 9 



8 



3 
2 
2 
2 



9 
8 
8 
2 



Boys 2nd-3rd grade 

Russia 8 2 18 

Finland 8 1 1 17 

Scotland 6 4 12 

Iceland S 4 1 11 

Greece 4 



Netherlands 3 



Poland 
Sweden 



3 




4 
4 

5 
7 
7 
9 



1 


1 



Blackburn 3 5 2 8 

Liberpool 3 5 17 

Aston Villa 2 5 3 7 

Girls 1st grade 

Chile -90 1 19 

Argentina 4 5 19 

Brazil 3 6 17 

Colombia 1 6 3 5 

Girls 2nd grade 

Luxemburg 8 2 16 

Treland 7 3 14 

England 5 5 10 

Scotland 10 

Girls 3rd-5th grade 



Boys 4lh-5tli grade 



Belgium 

England 

Denmark 

Italy 

France 

Ireland 

Austria 

Germany 



8 1 
6 4 



5 
4 
5 

3 
3 

2 



4 
3 
5 
6 
6 
7 



I 17 

12 

1 11 



3 

1 
i 
I 



11 

Id 

7 

7 

5 



India 

China 

Singapore 

Taiwan 

Indonesia 

Japan 

Korea 

Tahiti 

Thailand 

Australia 



6 
5 
5 
5 
4 
2 
4 
3 
3 
2 



2 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
6 



2 
2 

2 



14 
12 
12 



1 U 



3 
5 




5 - 2 
5 2 

5 3 



11 
9 
8 
8 
8 
7 



Boys 6tli-8th grade 

Shcffied 7 1 2 16 

Arsenal 6 1 3 15 

Ipswich 5 5 10 



Girls 6th-Slli grade 

Germany 9 18 

Scotland 4 4 2 10 

Netherlands 4 4 19 

Denmark 4 5 19 

Italy 2 6 2 6 

England 2 6 2 6 



Scores 
Boys 1st grade 
Antigua 2, Chile 
Belize 2, Trinidad 2 
Bolivia 1, Venezuela 1 
Peru 4, Bahamas 1 

Boys 2nd-3rd grade 
Finland 7, Poland 
Iceland 1, Sweden 1 
Netherlands 3, Scotland 2 
Russia 5, Greece 3 

Boys 4th-Sth grade 
Denmark 2, Italy 2 
England 3, Ireland 2 
Belgium 4, Germany 
Austria 4, France 2 

Girls 1st grade 

Argentina 1, Brzil 
Chile 2, Colombia 

Girls 2nd grade 

England 2, Scotland 1 
Ireland 4, Luxembourg 1 

Girls 3rd-5th grade 
India 0, Tahiti 
China 3, Taiwan 2 
Indonesia 2, Thailand 2 
Australia 3, Singapore 1 
Japan 3, Korea 

Girls 6lh-8th grade 
England 2, Italy 1 
Germany 7, Scotland 2 
Denmark 1, Neiherland 



Arm tackle 

Antioch sophomore Jason Breen arm tackles North Chicago's Shaun Glass 
in Antioch's 13-0 win over the Warhawks. Antioch plays at Rockford Boylan, 
while North Chicago hosts Zion-Benton this weekend.— Photo by Steve 
Young. 



Girls Volleyball 



Libertyville undefeated 

The Libertyville Wildcats volleyball 
team upped its season record to 12-0 after 
beating Carmel 15-7, 19-17 and North 
Chicago 15-1, 15-2. Arian Adams, Lindsey 
Celba, Katie Sriver, and Jamie Vinci scored 
well for the Wildcats. 

Stevenson wins again 

Stevenson bounced back from its loss to 
Antioch in the Stevenson Invitational by 
drilling Lake Forest- 15-1, 15-12 in North 
Suburban Conference action. Stevenson is 
now 14-4 on the season, 3-1 in the NSC, and 
were lead by Tiffany DeBolt, Tamika 
Catchings, Anna Hamilton and Staci 
Sliwinski. DeBolt finished with 20-21 
serving points and an ace. Stevenson also 
defeated North Chicago 15-2, 15-4 in 
another NSC match. Lisa Kolay lead the 
Patriots with three kills. 

Mundelein defeats Antioch 

The Mundelein Mustangs despite 
missing three key players, including 
Christy Sabo, defeated Antioch on the road 
15-2, 15-12 in North Suburban Conference 
action. Mundelein was lead by Kandace 
Kcssel, Lynn T'Niemi and Lisa Guilianclli in 
a balanced attack that stunned the talented 
Sequoits. , 

Carmel defeats Guerin 

The Carmel Corsairs volleyball team 
improved its season record to 6-2 after 
beating East Suburban Catholic Conference 
foe Guerin 15-3, 15-3. Jenny Logue and 
Kelly Penny lead the way for the Corsairs. 



Wauconda 1-2 for the week 

Even a great performance by Wauconda's 
Allison Goebcl was not enough to save the 
Bulldogs from the Johnsburg Skyhawk 
volleyball team in Johnsburg's win 15-6, 
15-10 in a Northwest Suburban Conference 
match. Laura Jessonge (three kills) and Kim 
Donahue (6-7 serving) lead the for Wauconda 
in the loss. Goebel was 9-9 serving with 
three aces. Wauconda however, earned a 15- 
11, 13-15, 15-5 win against Lake Forest 
Academy as Donahue and Megan Brill lead 
the way for the Bulldogs. Wauconda also 
- lost to defending Northwest Suburban 
Conference champion Grayslake 15-1, 15-5 
in Grayslake. 

Johnsburg rolls 

Johnsburg's volleyball team defeated 
Round Lake 17-15, 15-6 in Northwest 
Suburban Conference play. Lynnette Regner 
played an outstanding game for the Lady 
Skyhawks with 14 service points and eight 
aces. Johnsburg's record improves to 10-3, 
6-0 in the NWSC. 

Round Lake splits games 

The Round Lake volleyball team defeated 
a wounded Wauconda team 15-5, 15-9, but 
lost to powerful Marion Central 15-8, 15-0. 
Tina Cordoba and Rene Pierson, two setters, 
have lead the team in points said Round Lake 
coach Diane Eiserman. Karen Minkalis and 
Jamie Mcilke were also noted for their play 
as outside hitters. Round Lake is at 
Grayslake on Oct 4. 



Boys Cross Country 



Carmel earns record 

The Carmel boys cross country team's 
double* wins over St Joseph and Holy Cross 
in East Suburban Conference matchups were 
a day for the record book. Martin Barco ran 
the three-mile course in 15:33 for a record. 
Carmel's Jim Fieberg was second at 15:34. 
The Corsairs had seven of the match top 
eight runners and had eight runners break 
the 17-minutc mark. The previous team 
record for a three-mile course was 15:59. 
Carmel improved its record to 4-0 in the 
ESCC. 



Stevenson splits tri-meet 

The Stevenson boys cross country team 
split a tri meet with Fenton and Zion-Benton 
at Varblc Park in Bcnsenville. Fenton beat 
Stevenson 21-39 and Zion-Benton 15-50. 
Stevenson beat Zion-Benton 15-49. 
Stevenson's Michael Camopelta won the 
three-mile event with a time of 16:11. Other 
Stevenson finisher included Chris Rocus 



(7th), Brian Dcnard (9), and Steve Kapclli 
(12th). 

Libertyville wins 

The Libertyville Wildcat boys cross 
country team defeated Lake Forest 17-46 in a 
dual-meet at Adler Park. The Wildcats took 
nine of the top ten finishers in the 
convincing win. Libertyville's Drew 
Leffelman won the three-mile race at 16:43, 
while Andrew Willgress and Mike Inkmann 
finished closely behind. 

Antioch wins NSC tri-meet 

The Antioch Sequoit boys cross country 
team defeated Warren 17-45, and Mundelein 
20-43 in a North Suburban Conference tri- 
meet. Warren defeated Mundelein 26-29. 
Antioch's Tony Ringelstctn won the three- 
mile race at 16:57. Mundelein's Jeremy 
Garbacz finished second at 17:02 and 
Warren's Brian Twadell finished fifth at 
17:55. The Sequoits had seven finishers in 
the meet's top 10. Warren had two top 
finishers, while Mundelein had one. 






Friday, October 1. 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 55 



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Rain postpones Night of 




2 



For a record-setting tenth time this 
season, Mother Nature was the only win- 
ner on Sept. 25 as constant heavy rains 
throughout the morning and afternoon 
forced Toft Auto Racing officials to post- 
pone the Night of Championships pro- 
gram. 

The complete program which includes 
all five divisions; sprints, modifieds, 
sportsman, Old Style mini-sprints ami 
mini-modifieds has been reset for Satur- 
day, Oct. 2 with a ralndate of Saturday, 
Oct. 9. 

As a result, the Coors Light Silver 
Bullet Wisconsin Modified Challenge 
Round II winged program has been pushed 
back to the opening night of "Wisconsin's 
Clay Center of Speed" 41st season on 
Saturday, April 9, 1994. 

With the schedule change, track 
championships will either be decided or 
have been clinched in all five classes on 
Oct. 2. 

The newest division at the one-third 
mile clay oval is giving the fans the clos- 
est championship battle ever in the track's 
40 year history. The mini-modifieds find a 
tie atop the standings with two competi- 
tors from Paddock Lake, Glen Vernezze 
and Dr. Ken Johnson, a dentist, knotted at 
476 points. That title will be determined 
by the way they finish in the season 
championship feature. 



In the sprints, Mike Frost of Zion, a 
four-time modified champion, holds a 30- 
point advantage over three-time sprint 
king Dick Colburn of Muskego, 882-852; 
heading into the final night. 

In the modifieds, defending champion 
Lenny Ostrowski, Jr. of North Cape 
moved a step closer to repeating with the 



Wilmot 
Speedway 



rainout. Ostrowski holds an almost in- 
surmountable lead of 48 points, 748-700, 
over second place Jimmy Uttech, Jr., of 
Kenosha. Uttech still has to worry about 
a fast-closing Dennis Spitz of Kenosha 
who is 19 points out of second in third 
with 681. 

The wet weather also aids Ed Devall 
of Waukegan, in quest of his first-ever 
track title, second place Scott Kuxhouse 
of Round Lake trails the front-runner by 
39 points, 894-855. 

Elkhart Lake's Scott Sippel clinched 
his first track crown ever with a feature 
win on Sept. 18. Rubicon's Romy Baus, 
1992 champion, is solidly in second. 

The 22nd Annual Collis A. Pearson 
Memorial Modified Invitational will be 



on the Oct. 2 program. The event, named 
after the late father in-law of former 
Wilmot modified competitor Ken Monroe 
of Pell Lake, is held to recognize the 
modified drivers who do 'not win the 
feature events and often times fail to make 
the main. 

Beginning with 1993,- the race adds 
extra significance in that the winner will 
earn a berth in the 1994 modified feature 
chajienge. The 1993 winner, Kenosha's 
Tim Ammon, came close to winning a 
feature on SepL 1 1 but ended up second 
after going wheel to wheel with Spitz for 
the final half of the race. The 1993 field 
will be open to competitors who have not 
won a modified main event ever and who 
have competed in a minimum of 85 per- 
cent of the completed TAR programs. 

"We hope the new format will help 
the competitors and fans to realize the 
importance of the Collis A. Pearson event 
and will be in keeping with the spirit 
with which Penny Pearson, his widow, 
and the Monroe family continue to sup- 
port the race," said prompter Ray Toft. 

A total of 17 races are scheduled for 
the Oct. 2 program with no increase in 
grandstand admission. 

Motor Sports Unlimited with producer 
Bill Wildt will be on hand at Wilmot 
Speedway on Oct. 2 recording a one-hour 
cable television program on "Wisconsin's 



Clay Center of Speed." The show will an- 
on various cable systems throughout the 
Chicago metropolitan area as well as 
numerous suburbs during the winter 
months as well as next spring. 

Each race night for the remainder of 
the season, fans, competitors and crew 
members are encouraged to bring a single 
canned item to be donated to the Midwest- 
ern Flood Relief effort. Collection con- 
tainers will be placed at the grandstand en- 
trance and pit gate. 

Tickets for and Annual Toft Auto 
Racing Night of Champions Din- 
ner/Dance on Saturday, Oct. 23 at Mar- 
avella's Restaurant in Fox Lake are avail- 
able at the Speedway souvenir trailer on 
race nights for the remainder of the sea- 
son. Tickets are $18 each for the sit-down 
prime rib dinner. Groups who have pur- 
chased ten tickets may reserve a table by 
contacting Joan Toft at the Speedway. 
Tickets may also be purchased by mail by 
sending a check or money order to Toft 
Auto Racing, Inc., P.O. Box 786, Anti- 
och, 111. 60002. Include a stamped, self- 
addressed return envelope. 

Gates open at Wilmot Speedway at 5 
p.m. with the first race at 6:45. There 
will be no time trials on Oct. 2. 

For additional information on Wilmot 
events, contact the track office at 395- 
0500. 



ACHS Athlete of the Week for Sept. 18 



Congratulations to Mike 
Stephenson for being 
selected Athlete of the 
Week for the week ending 
Sept. 18. Stephenson 
gained 1 1 3 yards and scored 
three touchdowns in the 
Sequoit's victory over 
Warren. Stephenson was 
also named player of the 
game by U.S. Cable and 
player of the week by 
Lakeland Newspapers for 
his performance. The First 
Chicago Bank of Antioch 
will make a donation to the 
high school scholarship 
fund in Stephenson's name. 




Boys Golf 



Varsity football coach Del Pechauer presents 
Stephenson with his plaque and check. 



Stevenson defeats Antioch 

Consistant scores helped Stevenson 
defeat North Suburban Conference foe 
Antioch 165-207 at' the Arboretum Golf 
Course. Dan Murray led the Patriots with a 
score of 40, while Jason Scarborough (41), 
Scott Harris and Nale McCabe (42). scored 
for Stevenson. 



Lake Zurich splits games 

The Lake Zurich Bears defeated the 
Jacobs Golden Eagles 163-179 as Bears 
golfer Michael Keeter (39) was the only 
golfer to score under 40. Eric Ppss and Dan 
Schuh both shot 40s to score for the Bears. 
However, the Bears played poorly against 
Crystal Lake Central and lost to the Tigers 



161-184 at Turnberry Country Club. Poss 
lead the Bears with a team low 43, while 
Nick Micoletti (44), Rick Haering (48) and 
Tony Strobl (49) scored well. The Bears 
season record now stands at 6-4. 



Mundelein defeats Rams 

The Mundelein Mustang golf team 
defeated. Grayslake 171-180 behind 
medalist Dan Porter (38), and Matt Veccic 
(43) at Four Winds Golf Course. However, 
Crystal Lake South shot a team score of 177 
to defeat Mundelein (182) in a non- 
confcrnce dual meet at Four Winds Golf 
Course in Mundelein. Porter shot a team low 
42 to lead the Mustangs. Mundelein is now 
4-6 on the season. 






Antioch wins NSC tri-meet 

The Antioch Sequoit girls cross country team. won a 
North Suburban tri-meet by defeating Warren 15-45, and 
Mundelein 17-40. Mundelein defeated Warren 22-33 for 
second place. Antioch's Beth Lennon lead the way for the 
Sequoits as she won the race with a 12:59 time. Sequoit's 
Lauren Burke, Megan Durney and Mandy Dale finished 
second through fourth behing Lennon. Mundelein's Laura 
DiJbseph finished fifth at 13:27, while Warren's Raegan 
Taylor finished eighth at 14:31. 

Stevenson takes tri-meet 

The Stevenson Patriot girls cross country team won a 
tri-meet with Fenton and Zion-Benton at Varable Park in 
Bensenville. Stevenson defeated Fenton 25-36 and Zion- 
Benton 25-34. Stevenson's high finisher was Kate Steger 
(5th) at 14:45. However, Stevenson landed the next 13 out 
of 15 positions to win the tri-meet easily. The top seven 
school's finishers count in the team's final score. 



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56 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1 , 1993 



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Lakeland Newspaper 57 



Friday, October! , 1993 



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Leadership and anti-gang 
effort keeps Scouts strong 



The second-grade class hones their computer skills at the Millburn School 
Computer Lab. All grade levels use the lab. Pictured is second-grade teacher 
Laura Jendrzejewski making sure they are doing their work. Photo by Alec 
Junge. 

Millburn computer lab 
helps kids learn basics 



by ALEC JUNGE 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Millburn school is in it's full year of 
implementing a computer program as part 
of the curriculum. 

The $46,000 computer lab was paid 
for by private contributions, mostly from 
the Parent Teacher Organization and, fund 
raisers were held to raise money for the 
equipment. The lab features 21 computers 
and three others throughout the building, 
according to Jeanncte Hanna, office 
manager. 

The school has a part-time computer 
coordinator, Joanne Ralhundc who is 
implementing computer skills with 
practical school learning. 

"We combine the computer skills with 
all aspects of the curriculum," Rathunde 
said. "We are combining the computers 
with all phases of classwork." 

Rathunde said all grades from 
kindergarten up will be involved with 
computers. The early grades are learning 
simple keyboard commands. The third to 
eighth-graders will be using word 



processing and may get some desktop 
publishing experience. 

Not only are the kids learning to apply 
computers to work experience, but the 
teachers arc required to participate in the 
sessions so they can be more computer 
literate and understand what the kids are 
learning as well. 

Rathunde said the children have loved 
using the computers. "They are excited to 
be in here." 

The kids have been well behaved and 
have treated the equipment well, according 
to Rathunde. 

"They respect the equipment and treat 
it as if it was a Christmas present. There 
are stiff punishments and the children 
know that," Rathunde said. 

The program will be evaluated at the 
end of the year. At present there isn't 
much software so they arc utilizing what 
is available. "We will evaluate the 
software and sec how it connects with 
curriculum in the building," Rathunde 
said. 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Scouting is alive and very well in central 
northwestern Lake County, according to 
the new. district executive of Northeast 
Illinois Council. 

"People here are genuinely concerned and 
people in Scouting are genuinely 
concerned about Scouting," Stephen Fox 
said. 

Fox has been on the job as district 
executive director for the Highland Park- 
based district for eight months. The 
district includes troops in Grayslake, 
Wauconda, Round Lake area, Lindenhurst, 
Lake Villa, Fox Lake, Antioch and 
Ingleside. 

"Many people are concerned about gangs. 
What better 'gang' is there than 
Scouting," Fox said. 

Fox said he does not see a change soon 
in letting girls into Boy Scout troops. 

"Girls have Girl Scouts of America 
which does similar, but not exact things," 
Fox said. 

Both boys and girls may join the group 
for older teens, Explorers. 

Women may hold all leadership posi- 
tions in Scouting. 

"That was not the case five years ago. 
Boy Scouts won the court battles, but de- . 



Millburn School proposes 
an 8.7 percent increase 



by ALEC JUNGE 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Millburn School District 24 is propos- 
ing an 8.7 percent increase in its budget 
from last year. 

Existing homeowners would have to 
pay a 5 percent increase and homeowners 
of newly constructed homes would pay a 
larger amount, according to Jim 
Blockinger, DisL 24 supt. The budget re- 
quest this year is $2.9 million compared 
with $2.75 last year. 
. "Teacher salaries had a 6 percent raise 
from last year," Blockinger said. "We are 
switching to a whole language literature 
based program which is expensive. The 
general costs of the operating went up." 

Blockinger said the literature based 
program will cost $18,000 and be used for 



People News 



grades K-5. He said the new program is 
integrated in all facets of the language 
program. 

* "We integrate the program in all our 
language program, spelling, writing and 
reading. We spend all the mornings on die 
literature-based program ," Blockinger said. 

Blockinger added increased costs of 
textbooks, supplies also had a part in 
raising the budget request. 

The people who would pay the most 
arc the residents in Wadsworth who are 
new to the district. Blockinger estimates 
about 20 new homeowners in Wadsworth 
would be considered new construction. 

The budget hearing on the issue is 
scheduled on Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. at 
Millburn School. 



Good Conduct Medal 

Marine Cpl. Marcus H. Kropp, 

son of Joanne M. Conrady of Antioch 
recently received the Marine Corps Good 
Conduct Medal. The medal recognizes the 
servicemember's honest and faithful 
service during a three-year period, To earn 
it, Kropp achieved and maintained a 
satisfactory level of performance and an 
unblemished conduct record for the entire 
period. He is currently assigned with 
Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 



cided this was time to do something about 
that," Fox said. 

Fox explained how Scouting interacts 
with organizations which sponsor char- 
ters, and the history of Scouting, to 
Grayslake Exchange Club members. 

"Scouting strives to. teach a child and in- 
still the values of duty to God, country 
and self. Lord Baiden Powell developed 
Scouting in the late 1800s as a survival 
test in the woods. He felt if youngsters 
knew how to survive in the woods, they 
could do so in real-life situations," Fox 
said. 

Fox, a Janesville, Wis. native, earned the 
highest level in Scouting," the Eagle 
badge. 

"It takes anywhere from two and one-half 
to six years to be an Eagle Scout. Coor- 
dinating a community service project is 
the last requirement," Fox said. 

A Gurnee resident, he described the 
agreement between the Scout troop and 
community organization as a partnership. 
Grayslake Exchange Club sponsors Pack 
96. 

"The organization supports Boy Scouts 
and it is part of its program development. 
Troop 96 is doing very well in brining 
new parents in and providing leaders," 
Fox said. 



Exchange club sponsors 
SHARE/Foods program 



It's as easy as 1 - 2 - 3! 
To save 40 to 60 percent on 
groceries each month on 
items such as potatoes, 
corn, oatmeal, bread, 
turkey, crackers, pasta, 
celery, cookies, rice and 
peas, sign-up, volunteer and 
pick-up. 

This is how it works: 
The Exchange Club of An- 
tioch buys each package of 
food worth at least $40 for 
$15, and sells it to you for 
$15. All that's asked is that 
you give two hours of 
community service to a 
school, church or any non- 
profit agency. For example 
you can help distribute the 
SHARE/Foods one Satur- 
day morning each month. 

To sign up for mis pro- 
gram, bring $15 to one of 



the following locations by 
1 p.m. Oct. 9, and/or Nov. 
6 for pickup on Oct. 23 and 
Nov. 20 respectively: State 
Bank of Antioch, 440 Lake 
St., Antioch; First National 
Bank of Antioch, 485 Lake 
St., Antioch; Lake Villa 
Township Office, -37908 N. 
Fairfield Rd. t Lake Villa; 
State Bank of Antioch, Lin- 
denhurst Facility, 2031 E. 
Grand Ave., Lindenhurst 

Pick up will be on Oct. 
23 and Nov. 20 at the Anti- 
och Veteran's of Foreign 
Wars (VFW) Hall, 75 North 
Ave., Antioch from 10 to 
10:30 a.m. 

You can place more 
than one order. Everyone 
can participate. 

For more information, 
you can call the Coordina- 



tors, Claudette Skvarce, 
395-6744 or Ardeen Harris, 
395-2761 or Yolanda 
Obennaier, 395-7554. 

Additional monthly 
dates are posted in busi- 
nesses around Antioch or 
call one of the numbers 
listed above or stop by one 
of die places of application. 

Make your food budget 
stretch through 

SHARE/Foods. 



Marine Corps Air Station, Tustin, Calif. 
The 1989 graduate of Mundelein High 
School joined the Marine Corps in 
March, 1990. 

Completes basic 

Navy Hospitalman Jennifer A. 
Gifford, daughter of John H. and Linda 
S. Gifford of Antioch, completed basic 
training at Recruit Training Command, 
Orlando, Fla. Gifford is a 1990 graduate 
of Yuba City High School of Yuba City, 
Calif. 



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PITTMAN 



MOTORS 




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UNDER THE ANTIOCH WATER TOWER 
ON RT. 173, 1/4 MILE EAST OF RT. 831 

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PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Dan's 

Auto Detailing 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANSACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY: 40973 N. 
Rto. 59, Antioch, IL 60002. 
NAME(S) AND POST OF- 
FICE OR RESIDENCE AD- 
DRESSES) OF THE PER- 
SONS) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Dan E. 
Brylinko Sr., 40973 N. Rta. 
59, Antioch, IL 60002. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Dan E. Brylinko Sr. 
September 16, 1993 

The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the per- 
sons) Intending to con- 
duct the business this 
September 16, 1993. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Carmen E. Toro 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: Sop. 16, 1993 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0993D-031-AR 

September 24, 1993 

October 1, 1993 

October 8, 1993 



58 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, October 1,1993 



i 

4.4 



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You can lower your tax 
bill and keep your tax-re- 
turn preparation fees to a 
minimum by organizing 
your financial records and 
providing your tax pre- 
parer with accurate and 
comprehensive informa- 
tion, says the Illinois CPA 
Society. 

This task doesn't have 
to be a daunting one: 

If you don't know how 
to begin collecting the 
documents necessary to 
prepare your tax return, 
here's, some guidance. 

Document your 

income 

Your tax preparer will 
need to know your total or 
gross Income for the past 
year. Before you meet with 
him or her, take the time 
to make a list of your vari- 
ous sources of income and 
to gather appropriate 
documentation. W-2 
forms, provided by em- 
ployers, indicate how 
much compensation you 
received during the year 
and how much was with- 
held for federal income 
tax and other deductions, 
such as state income tax, 
local income tax, and 
FICA (Social Security). 
Employers are required to 
man these forms by Jan- 
uary 31. 

If you own stocks or 
bonds, you will also be re- 
ceiving 1099 forms in the 



financial records for tax savings 



mail to report your divi- 
dend and interest income. 
Banks and savings institu- 
tions will also send you 
10995 if your cash deposits 
earned interest. You may 
receive a 1099 from your 
state government indicat- 
ing any tax refunds re - 
ceived for the prior year. 
Finally, your stockbroker 
will send you Form 1099-B 

reporting the sale of any 
securities. 

Other types of taxable 
income include unem- 
ployment compensation, 
dividends, some Social 
Security or pension bene- 
fits, alimony, capital 
gains, rents as well as any 
income from self-em- 
ployment or partnerships. 
Identify tax deductions 

Draw up a preliminary 
list of your deductible ex- 
penses using your tax 
form as a guide. Then re- 
view your tax returns for 
the previous year or two. 
Note the kinds of deduc- 
tions you claimed and de - 
cide whether any of these 
may be claimed again this 
year. You'll also want to 
consider whether there 
have been any drastic' 
differences in your in- 
come or circumstances 
that may affect your eligi- 
bility for certain deduc- 
tions. If in reviewing last 
year's return, you discover 
that you overlooked some 



significant tax deductions, 
all is not Jos t Generally, 
you can amend returns for 
up to three years after the 
original due date. 

An easy way to locate 
documentation related to \ 
your tax-deductible ex- 
penses for 1991 is by re- 
ferring to your checkbook 
register. Be on the lookout 
for checks written to chari- 
table organizations, doc- 
tors and dentists, as well 
as checks written for ex- 
penses associated with 
performing your job or 
looking for a new job. Al- 
though at first glance each 
of these expenses may not 
seem like much, when to- 
talled they may translate 
Into a substantial tax sav- 
ings. 

You should also review 
credit card statements 
and locate receipts that 
may verify deductible 
business expenses, such 
as the costs for uniforms, 
membership association 
or union dues, profes- 
sional periodicals and 
even job-related moving 
expenses. 

It's also a good idea to 
check your datebook for 
the past year to be sure 
you haven't overlooked 
any meal or entertain- 
ment costs that may qual- 
ify as eligible business ex- 
penses. There are limita- 
tions that apply to the de- 



ductibility of these ex- 
penses so be sure to check 
with a tax preparer, such 
as a CPA, in identifying el- 
igible expenses. 

As a homeowner, you 
may also be entitled to 
deductions for your real 
estate taxes and mortgage 
interest Mortgage lenders 
usually send you a form 
stating how much mort- 
gage interest you paid 
over the past year. 

You should also alert 
your tax preparer to any 
interest you paid on a 
home equity loan. Interest 
on such loans is one of the 
few types of interest ex- 
penses that most taxpay- 
ers are eligible to fully 
deduct on their tax re- 
turns. 

If you own rental 
property, collect all re- 
ceipts for expenses, such 
as repairs and renova- 
tions. This information is. 
vital since it can help your 
tax preparer identify valu- 
able deductions that can 
offset rental income. 
Calculate child-care 

expenses 

If you pay someone to 
care for your child while 
you work, you may also be 
eligible for a cblld-care 
credit of up to $720 for 
one qualifying dependent 
and $1,440 for two or 
more. Set aside receipts or 
cancelled checks that ver- 



(expenses, 

Medical $$$ 
Charily $$ 



-j. 



i i t i r i - — 




Ify your total expenses. 
You will also have to pro- 
vide the IRS with the 
name, address and Social 
Security number of the 
person caring for your 
child. 

Review dependent 

exemptions 

Before meeting with 
your tax preparer, you 
should also give some 
thought to the number of 
dependent exemptions 
you may claim. Make sure 
you take into account the 
tax consequences of such 
events as marriage, di- 
vorce, birth of a child, or 
an elderly parent who 



suddenly becomes depen- 
dent on you for financial 
support. 

Make time for 
recordkeeping 
If you find yourself de- 
voting hours to locating 
receipts and other Infor- 
mation for your tax pre- 
parer, now Is a good time 
to organize your tax files 
and financial records. The 
Illinois CPA Society points 
to another reason for 
making recordkeeping a 
priority, the dreaded tax 
audit Remember, you are 
responsible for keeping 
books and records that 
sufficientiy support your 
deductions. 




The only constant in life is change. 
Which is why you need a bank that can 
keep up. 

And that's First of America. 

We have a vast array of products that 
are right for you no matter where you are 
in life. From low-rate car loans to 
Homelight mortgages, to Parkstone 
Tuition Management Fund, to retirement 



and estate planning. 

And we can also help your business 
with a Smart Business Loan SM . Or help 
you manage money better with InTouch 
Cash Manager 31 *. And there's so much 
more. 

You can always count on change. 
Just make sure you have a bank that you 
can always count on. 



O FIRSr G FAMRiCA 



Member FDIC. Equal Housing LenderXBlTDD available at 1-800-289-4614. & For information call us at: Aurora 708-892-8901; 

Naperville 708-305-8090; Fox Lake 587-0601; Bannockburn 31 7-2350; Lindenhurst 356-3541; Waukegan 244-0880; Lake Zurich 540-0880; 

Libertyville 362-3000; Grayslake 362-3000; Mundelein 566-2958; Round Lake Beach 223-3900; Vernon Hills 362-3000; Wauconda 526-4730; 

Wildwood 362-3000; Winthrop Harbor 872-2960; Zion 746-1211; Beach Park 249-4000; Niles 390-1200. 



Friday, October 1,1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 59 



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Home warranties can 
help buyers and sellers 



Although written dis- 
closure of known property 
defects by home sellers 
and real estate profes- 
sionals is practiced in 
many states on a voluntary 
or mandated basis, dis- 
closure itself does not 
guarantee that problems 
won't arise after the sale is 
closed. 

If problems do arise 
after a sale is final, the 
buyer may become frus- 
trated and even feel that 
the seller and/or his or 
her real estate agent 
should be liable for any 
repair or replacement 
costs incurred. Increas- 
ingly, sellers and real es- 
tate professionals are re- 
sponding to these con- 
cerns by buyers through 
the purchase of home 
warranties, one-year ser- 
vice contracts that cover 
the repair or replacement 
of major home systems 
and appliances that break 
down due to normal wear 
and tear. 

While these policies 
are popular as selling 
tools in today's real estate 
market, just how much 
protection they can actu- 
ally provide often de- 
pends on a number of 
factors consumers need to 



consider. The Lake 
County Association of RE- 
ALTORS® offers these tips 
on finding the right home 
warranty for your needs. 

Typically, a home 
warranty is purchased by a 
buyer, seller or sales pro- 
fessional for a one-time 
premium that can range 
from $300 to $500. The 
policy generally covers 
major home systems, such 
as electrical, air condi- 
tioning, heating and 
plumbing. It also covers 
most built-in appliances. 
Under most policies, the 
only additional cost to the 
home owner is a service 
charge, to cover the cost of 
the repair visit. 

To be sure the home 
warranty you choose is 
right for your needs, be 
sure to understand exactly 
what the policy covers. 
The coverage provided is 
spelled out in the contract 
portion of the agreement 
and should be read care- 
fully. 

Before signing on the 
dotted line, consumers 
should consider the fol- 
lowing aspects of the 
home warranty they have 
in mind: 

• Regulations that govern 
these policies vary from 



state to state and thus can 
cause consumers confu- 
sion about what the policy 
can and does cover. Take 
time to find out the laws 
in your state that govern 
home warranties.. 

• Check the financial sta- 
tus and service record of 
the home warranty com- 
pany. Especially impor- 
tant, try 'to obtain recom- 
mendations from other 
consumers and real estate 
professionals who have 
worked with the firm. 

• Make sure the policy 
covers the home systems 
most common to the area 
where the home is lo - 
cated. For example, war- 
ranties written in warmer 
states should cover air 
conditioning and pool 
systems, while those writ- 
ten in rural areas should 
cover well pumps. 

Home warranties are 
not a catch-all tool to 
cover problems existing 
prior to the time a war- 
ranty is placed on a 
home. 

Selecting a reputable 
home warranty company 
is crucial to ensuring 
good service, check with a 
real estate professionals 
names of home warranty 
companies. 




If you have... 





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Sliding Siding 
Wrinkled Shingles 
Peeling Ceiling 
Or Not So Hot Heating 

we can help. 





Whether you want to fix up or spread out... 
the Bank of Northern Illinois, N.A. has a home 
improvement loan to meet your needs. 

Make your home warmer or cooler, nicer to live in and 
worth more money. We make our rates attractive. so/ ; f 
you can make your home even more attractive. '' * 

We also can talk to you about refinancing your mortgage oi 
obtaining a home equity loan. So, visit one of our three con- 
veniently located offices or call us and ask to speak to one of our 
friendly, knowledgeable personal bankers. 

Give your "Roost a Boost" or add "Room to Roam" 
with a Bank of Northern Illinois, N.A. 
HOME IMPROVEMENT LOAN. 



^2^ 




Bank of Northern Illinois, N.A 



One South Genesee 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

Member FDIC 



1313 Delany Road 
Gurnee, Illinois 60031 

708-623-3800 

Member FDIC 



929 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

LibertyvillD, Illinois 60048 




UKOEA 



No matter wher e 
you are, we're 
never far off* 

We've been serving this community for a very 
long time. And as your longstanding neighbors, 
we've always been there for you. And 
we always will be. 

We've helped families become homeowners. 
We've helped educate future leaders of commerce, 
politics, medicine and many other occupations. 
We've contributed to the overall financial 
security of our customers, our friends. And we 
want to help you, too! 

Find o ut why so many people you know keep 
doing business with us. Why they say our service 
is superior. Why they say our financial advice is 
prudent. And why they have more than one type 
of account with us. Stop in today and say "Hello." 
Wed love to see you! 



c 



STATE 
iBANK 



or ROUND LAKE 



First State Bank 
of Round Lake 



MAIN OFFICE 

1777 N.Cedar Lake Rd. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

708-546-2111 



BRANCH OFFICE 

Avilon & Goodnow Blvds. 
Round Lake, IL 
708-546-8444 



il CASH JTATIOfi 

■ l^I\i •eaAtfc«k>nka»0il«*dtcid«ncifcflrCahUc*wvte. 




& CIRRUS. 



lltll UllltC 

LENDER 



60 Lakeland Newspaper! 



Friday, October 1,1993 



* """""- ■- •-«»*rtJ&isi»e«*M«am.»aSMK« K «r±; • ■- • ;*««i*,ac. 















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After disaster strikes, 

your losses 




If your personal prop- 
erty was destroyed as re- 
sult of a flood, earthquake 
or vandalism, you proba- 
bly weren't thinking about 
your taxes as you surveyed 
the damage. However, as 
the Illinois CPA Society 
points out, you may be 
able to obtain some fi- 
nancial relief by taking a 
tax deduction for a por- 
tion of your casualty loss. 
What is a casualty loss? 

For tax purposes, ca- 
sualty losses are those that 
result from sudden, unex- 
pected or unusual events. 
These can include torna- 
does, hurricanes, floods 
and fires. 

A sudden event is one 
that is swift, not gradual or 
progressive. So, for exam- 
ple, you cannot take a de- 
duction for damage to 
your property that occurs 
as a result of gradual de- 
terioration or normal 
wear-and-tear, such as 
soil erosion that weakens 
the structure of your 
home, damage from ter- 
mites, or even a leaky roof. 
However, you can deduct 
losses resulting from 
damage to shrubs caused 
by accidentally applying a 
chemical weed killer to 
your lawn. 



In some instances, you 
may take a casualty loss 
for a car accident, pro- 
vided the accident did not 
result from your own will- 
ful negligence. A casualty 
loss includes damage to 
your car resulting from a 
collision, whether due to 
faulty driving of another 
or yourself. 

Deductions are also 
allowed for losses caused 
by theft, including rob- 
bery and embezzlement. 
However, you must be 
able to prove that a theft 
has taken place. The 
simple disappearance of 
money or property is not 
considered a theft in the 
eyes of the IRS. 

If you had money de - 
posited in a personal sav- 
ings or checking account 
in a bank or credit union 
that later went bankrupt 
or became insolvent, you 
may elect to take a casu- 
alty loss deduction for the 
money you lost. You 
should claim the loss in 
the year when it becomes 
clear that you will never 
recover your money from 
the lending institution. 

Be aware that you can- 
not claim a casualty loss 
deduction for money lost 
in the stock market or 



through poor real estate 

investments. 

How much of your loss is 

deductible? 

Before claiming any 
tax deductions for your 
personal casualty loss, you 
must first file for insur- 
ance reimbursement. Tax 
deductions are allowed 
only for uninsured losses.- 

The deduction for 
each casualty is then lim- 
ited to the uninsured 
amount in excess of $100. 
The $100 base applies to 
the total amount of dam- 
ages per casualty. So, for 
example, if a flood de- 
stroys the carpeting and 
furniture on the first floor 
of your home, the $100 
reduction applies to all of 
the items damaged, not 
each item individually. 
The aggregate unreim- 
bursed losses in excess of 
$100 are then deductible 
as an itemized deduction 
to the extent that the total 
exceeds 10 percent of your 
adjusted gross income 
(AGI). 

In estimating the 
damage to your property, 
don't assume that you can 
deduct the replacement 
value of the property. As a 
rule, the amount of a loss 
(Cont'd, on page 62) 





HOMETOWN ATTENTION: 

for your 

HOME IMPROVEMENT NEEDS 

Let Us Help You With a 

HOME EQUITY 
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Use it as you need it, for a boat, 
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Or A 

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SEE or CALL 

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In Antioch, Bill Ballistonc at 395-6822 

For HOMETOWN ATTENTION, ii'i your HOMETOWN UANK! I 

BANKofWAUKEGAN 




. . . has a heart 



Main Office 
1601 N. Uwii 
(700) 244-6000 



Member FDIC 



Welt Side Facility 
Green I)>y Road »i Grand Avenue 



Anu'oeh Facility 
Itoiile 59 at Cran Lake Road 



(708) 244-6000 

cftrnnATrO«v 

Bank ot Waukogan, a wholly owned subsidiary of Northern 
Statos Financial Corporation 



(708) 395-6022 



m 




Banking 

with the 

Hometown 



i 




We're just what you're looking for. 

We don't send your home loan papers to some far-away 
headquarters for approval. We don't need to. 

We don't have 800 numbers for you to request 
information from some stranger halfway across the 
country. We don't need those either, because we live 
here. 

Basically, what we have and what 
we offer you is - ourselves. 

Hometown people who are skilled professionals in 
personal and family money management. Neighbors 
dedicated to giving you everything you want and deserve 
from your financial resource. 



We have the services, too. 

. We've specialized in affordable home loans right from 
the start, along with risk-free savings plans. Today we 
offer many checking, savings, investment, and lending 
options to meet your growing, changing needs. Along 
with the professional expertise to help you keep moving 
ahead Financially. 

But we never forget what you want just as much — 
personal attention. A friendly voice on the line. A big 
smile across the counter. A warm handshake before you 
sit down at the desk. 

Stop in soon and get acquainted. You'll find we don't 
just promise Banking with a Hometown Touch. We give 
it. Because we live it! 



FIRST FEDERAL BANK, t* 

A wholly-owned subsidiary of Northern Financial Corp. 

5384 Grand Avenue 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

(708)249-6312 

Also In Waukegan 

Madison at County Street 1428 N. Lewis Avenue 



(708) 623-0084 



(708) 249-6307 



; 




993 



Friday, October 1, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 61 



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New financial guide available to help retirees 



Many people who save 
carefully for retirement 
are not properly manag- 
ing their money once they 
reach retirement age, ac- 
cording to financial ex- 
perts at one of the nation's 
leading investment firms. 

"A couple retiring In 
their early 60s can expect 
to live another 25 to 30 



years," says James S. 
Riepe, director of T, Rowe 
Price's Investment Ser- 
vices Division. "We be- 
lieve younger retirees, in 
particular, should main- 
tain a diversified strategy" 
that includes common 
stocks to help preserve 
their purchasing power. 
Many newly retired 



workers make two com- 
mon mistakes, he says. 
They are too conservative 
in their investment strat- 
egy, and they overlook the 
impact of inflation on 
their savings. 

After research showed 
that retirement planning 
is the top-ranked financial 
goal of its investors, Price 



Disaster 



(Contt'd from page 61) 
is the lesser of the proper- 
ty's adjusted basis or fair 
market value. The ad- 
justed basis is what you 
paid for the property, mi- 
nus depreciation and plus 
an increase in value as a 
result of improvements. 

Here's an example. A 
sudden storm hits your 
area causing a tree to 
.crash through a window, 
thereby damaging*your 
stereo equipment. The 
stereo system was pur- 
chased for $6,000 six years 
ago. However, its fair mar- 
ket value before the casu- 
alty was only $3,000. You 
are therefore entitled to a 
deduction of $3,000 less 
$100, assuming this 
amount exceeds 10 per- 
cent of your AGI. 
When can you deduct 
your casualty loss? 

Don't procrastinate in 



claiming a loss on your tax 
return. In most instances, 
you must deduct the loss 
in the year in which it has 
occurred. However, if. you 
live in an area that the 
federal government de- 
clares a disaster area, you 
can claim your loss either 
in the year die loss oc- 
curred or during the pre- 
vious year. To take a loss 
in the previous year, file 
an amended tax return. 
This procedure will en- 
able you to get an imme- 
diate refund of tax dollars. 
Losses in Federal disaster 
areas are subject to the 
same limitations as other 
casualty losses. 

Proving your losses 

The IRS expects you to 
be able to document the 
amount of the deduction 
you are claiming. Docu- 
mentation can consist of 
photographs of your 



home or property before 
and after the damage oc- 
curred, receipts for items 
lost or destroyed, or even 
newspaper clippings 
about a particular event. 
Appraisers' estimates of 
the damage can also help 
you to make your case 

before the IRS. Bear in 
mind that fees for an ap- 
praiser's estimate may be 
deemed a miscellaneous 
itemized expense and can 
be deducted to the extent 
that your miscellaneous 
expenses exceed two per- 
cent of your AGI. 

CPAs recommend that 
after suffering a casualty 
loss you carefully record 
and file your repair bills 
and insurance reports. 
These will help you prove 
the extent of the damage 
to your property to the IRS 
and help you substantiate 
your tax deduction. 



created a Retirees Flnan 
cial Guide that explores a 
wide range of money is- 
sues for people who have 
wound up their wage- 
earning years. For a free 
copy of the guide, call 
1(800)541-5940. 

The first part of the 
comprehensive, three- 
part kit addresses such 
concerns as the impact of 
inflation on retirement 
savings, the cost of health 
care, understanding So- 
cial Security benefits, 
working after retirement, 
handling lump-sum dis- 
tributions and using one's 
house as a retirement as- 
set. 

Part two is a workbook 
designed to help retirees 
estimate how much they 
can afford to spend with- 
out depleting their sav- 
ings. 

Developed in con- 
junction with the national 
public accounting firm of 
Coopers and Lybrand, the 
workbook shows the re- 
tired investor how to fac- 
tor In such variables as In- 
flation, taxes and the 
dwindling purchasing 
power of a fixed-income 
pension. 

Riepe estimates that it 
will take someone up to 
two hours to complete the 
workbook, but "determin- 
ing how much you can af- 
ford to spend is the most 



serious issue you face in 
your retirement plan." 
The kit's third part 
outlines several diversi- 
fied model portfolios for 
retirees to consider, ac- 
cording to their individual 
income needs and toler- 
ance for risk. 



T. Rowe Price man- 
ages more than $34 billion 
for 1.8 million individual 
and institutional investor 
accounts. The investment 
firm also offers a Retire- 
ment Planning Kit for 
people whose retirement 
is still many years away. 




Second income must be reported 

If you work a second 
job, for instance at night 
or on weekends, you must 
report these earnings on 
your federal income tax 
return. 

Some examples of 
"moonlighting," which 
produces income that 
must be reported, include 
an office worker a news- 
paper reporter who writes 
free-lance articles, a pub- 
lic school teacher who 
tutors for pay, or a con- 
struction worker who 
picks up extra money do - 
ing repair jobs on week- 
ends. 

Income from any 
source is taxable whether 
it is received in cash, 
property or services, un- 
less it is specifically ex- 
cluded by law. 

Some people who do 
work in addition to their 
regular jobs are consid- 
ered self-employed, not 
employees. Examples 
may include free-lance 
writers and repair persons 



who set their own sched- 
ules and work out of their 
own homes. These people 
also must report their in- 
come, and may have to 
pay self-employment tax 
(a form of social security 
tax). 

Employees who incur 
expenses in producing in- 
come, such as union dues 
or uniform expenses, may 
claim these expenses as 
miscellaneous deduc- 
tions. Certain miscella- 
neous deductions are de- 
ductible only to the extent 
that the total of these ex- 
penses exceeds two per- 
cent of adjusted gross in- 
come. 



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• 



62 Lakeland Newspapers 



.;.ti , ••'■•':. 




Friday, October 1. 1993 






GET "IT" OFF 
YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 




IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 32) 

teachers to your parents. They are the ones 
who can help you. -P. S.: We were not fooled at 
your attempts to sound like an adult. 

Happy commuter 

Hats off to PACE. It is about time they put a bus stop out 
in front of the village hall. Why don't they how extend the 
hours beyond 8 p.m. 

Building blues 

In Gumee, the planning commission gave a thumbs up to 
a 100 unit apartment complex on Old Grand Avenue. This 
is insane. It will destroy the small town atmosphere and 
increase our traffic problems. Call or write the mayor or 
planning commission and tell them no. 

Unlikely solution 

I agree with the social worker in "Fashion statement." 
The things that go on in the schools and the dress code I 
There should be a dress code and if we did we would not have 
all the problems we do. The kids are using the schools for 
gang meetings. They should be raised the way we were 
raised. 

Buck-up buddy 

I am calling from Gumee and want to wish Chad good luck 
in life. He just had a failed relationship and needs a little 
cheering up. 

Driver's side 

Just for the record, I am a school bus driver and we have to 
wear a seatbelt in case of an accident. Otherwise we would 
be thrown from our scats and through the windshield or 
thrown out of our scats. There arc seat belts in most buses 
but they are not there for the kids safety. Imagine after an 
accident having a bus driver run around trying to unbelt 60 
kids. It is safer not to have them. Personally, I am tired of 
people putting down school bus drivers. Parents need to 
teach children bus safety rules. 

Kick up coverage 

Every time I turn to the sports section, there is nothing 
about soccer. The Round Lake High School team is great. . 
It is time they got some recognition. 

Serious topics 

After six weeks of reading Lipscrvicc, why do so many 
people think that high school sports or cat laws, police 
lunchcsand_djinut shops, and fixinjj.your neighbor's fence 
'"are nonssues? I trunlTlf&ftJreifeTN whether or 

not we cancel. the Lake County Fair arc more* interesting 
topics. \ 



\ 



Editorial note: Dear reader, Llpservlce Is 
primarily an entertainment section. We are 
sorry you are not entertained. 

Bad experience 

In response to "Good doctor," my posterior end! My 
comments are the same as the other persons. He may be a 
good person, I just don't think he was a good doctor in my 
situation. If I listened to him, I would be at the cemetery 
today. 

More money please 

The Round Lake School board needs to pay their janitors, 
secretaries, and other support staff (except administration) 
a decent living wage. Vote no on the referendum until they 

are fair to their employees. 

i 

Rats no more 

I do not know if the cat hanging around our place is a 







-y- — - 




Newspapers 



- - «■ ■■* • .'j \ 



'stray or my neighbors. But, since the cat has been hanging 
around we have not seen any rats or mice anymore. I would 
rather have a cat around here than rats or mice. As for the . 
cat catching birds, most birds are able to get away. 

Both correct 

This is to address your editorial note that technically, the 
citizens of District 117 are responsible for the referendum 
drive. If that were true these people would need a petition 
with 10 percent of the local voters names in order to put it 
on the ballot This referendum is coming from the same 
old place it always did. It was just defeated six months ago. 
If the people wanted it on the ballot again, they would have 
put it on. 

Editorial note: Dear reader, as you noted, we 
said that "technically" the citizens are 
responsible for the referendum drive. We stand 
by this! While the school board put the Issue 
on the ballot, citizens In District 117 are 
conducting the campaign. 



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Friday, Octoberl, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 63 



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64 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday. October 1, 1993 



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